Abercrombie Ancient
This tartan can be traced back to 1831 when recorded in a publication by James Logan called The Scottish Gael. The origin of the name is from the small parish of Abercromby in Fife. The lands amp; title were given to a supporter of Edward 1 of England, who became William de Abercromby suggesting a Norman origin. The Abercromby title passed to another part of the family in the 17th Century, that of the Abercrombies of Birkenbog in Banffshire. This section of the family was active in opposing the Reformation, supporting the Covenanters until the end of the 17th Century when David Abercromby eventually conformed to the established Presbyterian church. Sir Ralph Abercrombie became one of the most influential military figures of the 18th Century responsible for much of Britains successful foreign campaigns, with his military strategies influencing the Duke of Wellingtons campaigns against the French. (view tartan)
Abercrombie Modern
This tartan can be traced back to 1831 when recorded in a publication by James Logan called The Scottish Gael. The origin of the name is from the small parish of Abercromby in Fife. The lands amp; title were given to a supporter of Edward 1 of England, who became William de Abercromby suggesting a Norman origin. The Abercromby title passed to another part of the family in the 17th Century, that of the Abercrombies of Birkenbog in Banffshire. This section of the family was active in opposing the Reformation, supporting the Covenanters until the end of the 17th Century when David Abercromby eventually conformed to the established Presbyterian church. Sir Ralph Abercrombie became one of the most influential military figures of the 18th Century responsible for much of Britains successful foreign campaigns, with his military strategies influencing the Duke of Wellingtons campaigns against the French. (view tartan)
Aberdeen
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Agnew Ancient
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Allison Ancient
The name Allison was first used by two sons of Alexander McAlister of Loupe, who moved with some of their followers to the parish of Avondale in Lanarkshire. The name can be traced back a considerable time in the various spellings. The earliest being that of Patrick Allisonne del Conte de Berwyk in 1298. The Allison tartan first appeared in the late nineteenth century and was registered in 1882. The setting used by Lochcarron is only one of two offically recognized settings. Both settings were registered in 1882 and therefore both can be considered authentic. (view tartan)
Anderson Ancient
Now fairly common throughout Scotland the name Anderson is first recorded in Peebles and Dumfries during the later 13th century. Thereafter there were families of the name in Edinburgh, Aberdeen and Banffshire, and amongst the oldest branches are those of Downhill, Westerbreck and Candacraig. In the Highlands the name takes the form MacAndrew which like Anderson, means ldquo;son of Andrew. Little John MacAndrew of Dalnahatnich, was a famous archer and his exploits against cattle thieves are still retold in his native glen. The MacAndrews of the Inverness area are claimed as septs of Clan Chattan, but the Andersons, as a family, are generally regarded as septs of Clan Ross. (view tartan)
Anderson Modern
Now fairly common throughout Scotland the name Anderson is first recorded in Peebles and Dumfries during the later 13th century. Thereafter there were families of the name in Edinburgh, Aberdeen and Banffshire, and amongst the oldest branches are those of Downhill, Westerbreck and Candacraig. In the Highlands the name takes the form MacAndrew which like Anderson, means ldquo;son of Andrew. Little John MacAndrew of Dalnahatnich, was a famous archer and his exploits against cattle thieves are still retold in his native glen. The MacAndrews of the Inverness area are claimed as septs of Clan Chattan, but the Andersons, as a family, are generally regarded as septs of Clan Ross. (view tartan)
Anderson Weathered
Now fairly common throughout Scotland the name Anderson is first recorded in Peebles and Dumfries during the later 13th century. Thereafter there were families of the name in Edinburgh, Aberdeen and Banffshire, and amongst the oldest branches are those of Downhill, Westerbreck and Candacraig. In the Highlands the name takes the form MacAndrew which like Anderson, means ldquo;son of Andrew. Little John MacAndrew of Dalnahatnich, was a famous archer and his exploits against cattle thieves are still retold in his native glen. The MacAndrews of the Inverness area are claimed as septs of Clan Chattan, but the Andersons, as a family, are generally regarded as septs of Clan Ross. (view tartan)
Angus Ancient
From the Gaelic Aonghus. This is a name which occurs throughout Scotland. As far back as the 5th century it appears in connection with the founding of the colony of the Dalriads. The Earldom of Angus, which is one of the most ancient in Scotland, was granted to one Gilchrist in the 12th century. The 13th century, however, saw the extinction of the Celtic line, and, after forfeiture, the Earldom passed to the Stewarts. In 1389 King Robert II granted the title to George de Douglas and his heirs, whom failing, to Sir Alexander Hamilton. The Earldom is now vested in the Dukedom of Hamilton. (view tartan)
Angus Modern
From the Gaelic Aonghus. This is a name which occurs throughout Scotland. As far back as the 5th century it appears in connection with the founding of the colony of the Dalriads. The Earldom of Angus, which is one of the most ancient in Scotland, was granted to one Gilchrist in the 12th century. The 13th century, however, saw the extinction of the Celtic line, and, after forfeiture, the Earldom passed to the Stewarts. In 1389 King Robert II granted the title to George de Douglas and his heirs, whom failing, to Sir Alexander Hamilton. The Earldom is now vested in the Dukedom of Hamilton. (view tartan)
Arbuthnot Ancient
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Auld Scotland
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Austin Ancient
The Austins were supporters of the Keiths and so close would their association appear to be that both wear the same tartan which, in some early tartan collections, is called quot;Keith and Austinquot;. In a legal action raised against George Keith, Earl Marshal in 1587, Alexander Austin became cautioner for him. This may be the Alexander Austin who was Scottish Member of Parliament for Edinburgh in the same year. There has been considerable variation in the spelling of the name and earliest forms, including Oisteane, Oustene, Owystyn and Ousteane, may be derived from the Gaelic name Uisdean. (view tartan)
Austin Modern
The Austins were supporters of the Keiths and so close would their association appear to be that both wear the same tartan which, in some early tartan collections, is called quot;Keith and Austinquot;. In a legal action raised against George Keith, Earl Marshal in 1587, Alexander Austin became cautioner for him. This may be the Alexander Austin who was Scottish Member of Parliament for Edinburgh in the same year. There has been considerable variation in the spelling of the name and earliest forms, including Oisteane, Oustene, Owystyn and Ousteane, may be derived from the Gaelic name Uisdean. (view tartan)
Baillie Ancient
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Baird Ancient
The Bairds are an ancient family and owned lands in Lanarkshire and the Barony of Cambuskenneth in the 13th and 14th centuries. They spread northwards to Banffshire and Aberdeenshire and acquired importance as Sheriffs of Aberdeen. There were some important branches, including Auchmeddan and Newbyth, and John Baird was created a knight baronet and became a Lord of Session with the title Lord Newbyth. General Sir David Baird had a long and notable military career in India, at the Cape of Good Hope, and at the siege of Copenhagen. After the death of Sir John Moore at Corunna he assumed chief command of the Army. He died in 1829. (view tartan)
Baird Modern
The Bairds are an ancient family and owned lands in Lanarkshire and the Barony of Cambuskenneth in the 13th and 14th centuries. They spread northwards to Banffshire and Aberdeenshire and acquired importance as Sheriffs of Aberdeen. There were some important branches, including Auchmeddan and Newbyth, and John Baird was created a knight baronet and became a Lord of Session with the title Lord Newbyth. General Sir David Baird had a long and notable military career in India, at the Cape of Good Hope, and at the siege of Copenhagen. After the death of Sir John Moore at Corunna he assumed chief command of the Army. He died in 1829. (view tartan)
Barclay Hunting Ancient
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Barclay Hunting Modern
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Bisset Ancient
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Black (Plain)
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Black Watch Ancient
This tartan bears the name of the famous 42nd Royal Highland Regiment (The Black Watch), the premier Highland Regiment. First raised in 1729, as four Independent Companies of Highlanders to patrol and keep the peace within the Highlands. Their complement was increased in 1739 and the companies formed into a regiment. The Black Watch has a long record of military service to the nation. They were called ldquo;Freiceadan Dubh by the Highlanders in allusion to the sombre colours of their tartan and to their employment as Watchers over the Highlands. The tartan is claimed to be of Campbell origin. (view tartan)
Black Watch Dress Ancient
This tartan bears the name of the famous 42nd Royal Highland Regiment (The Black Watch), the premier Highland Regiment. First raised in 1729, as four Independent Companies of Highlanders to patrol and keep the peace within the Highlands. Their complement was increased in 1739 and the companies formed into a regiment. The Black Watch has a long record of military service to the nation. They were called ldquo;Freiceadan Dubh by the Highlanders in allusion to the sombre colours of their tartan and to their employment as Watchers over the Highlands. The tartan is claimed to be of Campbell origin. (view tartan)
Black Watch Modern
This tartan bears the name of the famous 42nd Royal Highland Regiment (The Black Watch), the premier Highland Regiment. First raised in 1729, as four Independent Companies of Highlanders to patrol and keep the peace within the Highlands. Their complement was increased in 1739 and the companies formed into a regiment. The Black Watch has a long record of military service to the nation. They were called ldquo;Freiceadan Dubh by the Highlanders in allusion to the sombre colours of their tartan and to their employment as Watchers over the Highlands. The tartan is claimed to be of Campbell origin. (view tartan)
Black Watch Weathered
This tartan bears the name of the famous 42nd Royal Highland Regiment (The Black Watch), the premier Highland Regiment. First raised in 1729, as four Independent Companies of Highlanders to patrol and keep the peace within the Highlands. Their complement was increased in 1739 and the companies formed into a regiment. The Black Watch has a long record of military service to the nation. They were called ldquo;Freiceadan Dubh by the Highlanders in allusion to the sombre colours of their tartan and to their employment as Watchers over the Highlands. The tartan is claimed to be of Campbell origin. (view tartan)
Blair Ancient
Of territorial origin, from the Gaelic Blar, a moss, this name occurs in different parts of Scotland. One of the supporters of Sir William Wallace was Sir Bryce Blair of Blair, who was captured by the English at the close of the 13th century. Lands in Ayrshire came to the Blairs from Robert the Bruce. The Blairs of Balthyock were in Fife during the 13th century and it is from them that the Northern branch of the Blairs today claim descent. Other important branches are the families of Ardblair, Pittendreich and Glasclure. (view tartan)
Blair Modern
Of territorial origin, from the Gaelic Blar, a moss, this name occurs in different parts of Scotland. One of the supporters of Sir William Wallace was Sir Bryce Blair of Blair, who was captured by the English at the close of the 13th century. Lands in Ayrshire came to the Blairs from Robert the Bruce. The Blairs of Balthyock were in Fife during the 13th century and it is from them that the Northern branch of the Blairs today claim descent. Other important branches are the families of Ardblair, Pittendreich and Glasclure. (view tartan)
Borthwick
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Bowie Ancient
The name Bowie comes from the Gaelic Buidhe meaning Yellow, or bare haired. This is one of the many Gaelic descriptive names applied to individuals throughout the Highlands. The name was common in Argyllshire and also occurs in Arran, South Uist and Strathspey. Bowie is claimed to be a sept of the Grant and Campbell Clans. (view tartan)
Boyd Ancient
One likely derivation of this name is that it is taken from the Island of Bute, the Gaelic name of which is Bod. This, in the genitive becomes Bhoid, the Marquess of Bute, in Gaelic, becoming Morair Bhoid. This appears the more likely in that the first recorded Boyds were vassals of the De Morevilles in the regality of Largs. A different origin altogether of the name is that Walter and Simon, sons of Alan, Hereditary Stewart of Dol, in Normandy, who came to England in the reign of Henry I, went north to seek their fortune. Robert, the son of Simon, became the progenitor of the Boyds since he was himself known as Buidhe (Gaelic: yellow) from the colour of his hair. The name is still common in the Highlands, particularly in Lochaber. From this tradition comes the fact that the Boyds are recognised by some authorities as a sept of the Royal Stewarts. (view tartan)
Boyd Modern
One likely derivation of this name is that it is taken from the Island of Bute, the Gaelic name of which is Bod. This, in the genitive becomes Bhoid, the Marquess of Bute, in Gaelic, becoming Morair Bhoid. This appears the more likely in that the first recorded Boyds were vassals of the De Morevilles in the regality of Largs. A different origin altogether of the name is that Walter and Simon, sons of Alan, Hereditary Stewart of Dol, in Normandy, who came to England in the reign of Henry I, went north to seek their fortune. Robert, the son of Simon, became the progenitor of the Boyds since he was himself known as Buidhe (Gaelic: yellow) from the colour of his hair. The name is still common in the Highlands, particularly in Lochaber. From this tradition comes the fact that the Boyds are recognised by some authorities as a sept of the Royal Stewarts. (view tartan)
Brodie Hunting Ancient
The Province of Moray has been the home of the Brodies since the 12th century and Brodie Castle, near Forres, is the home of the chief. In 1645 Lord Lewis Gordon burned the old Brodie house and the family charters and papers were destroyed. It is thus difficult to find much regarding the clan's early history. John of Brodie is said to have assisted the Mackenzies against the MacDonalds at the Battle of Blair-na-Park in 1466, and in 1550 Alexander Brodie and over 100 others were denounced as rebels for attacking Cumming of Altyre. Alexander Brodie of Brodie was a Senator of the College of Justice and Member of Parliament from 1643 to 1649. (view tartan)
Brodie Hunting Weathered
The Province of Moray has been the home of the Brodies since the 12th century and Brodie Castle, near Forres, is the home of the chief. In 1645 Lord Lewis Gordon burned the old Brodie house and the family charters and papers were destroyed. It is thus difficult to find much regarding the clan's early history. John of Brodie is said to have assisted the Mackenzies against the MacDonalds at the Battle of Blair-na-Park in 1466, and in 1550 Alexander Brodie and over 100 others were denounced as rebels for attacking Cumming of Altyre. Alexander Brodie of Brodie was a Senator of the College of Justice and Member of Parliament from 1643 to 1649. (view tartan)
Brodie Red Modern
The Province of Moray has been the home of the Brodies since the 12th century and Brodie Castle, near Forres, is the home of the chief. In 1645 Lord Lewis Gordon burned the old Brodie house and the family charters and papers were destroyed. It is thus difficult to find much regarding the clan's early history. John of Brodie is said to have assisted the Mackenzies against the MacDonalds at the Battle of Blair-na-Park in 1466, and in 1550 Alexander Brodie and over 100 others were denounced as rebels for attacking Cumming of Altyre. Alexander Brodie of Brodie was a Senator of the College of Justice and Member of Parliament from 1643 to 1649. (view tartan)
Bruce Ancient
Sir Robert de Brus, Knight, who accompanied William the Conqueror to England, is the progenitor of this Family. His son, Robert de Brus, was Companion-at-Arms to Prince David, later King of Scots, from whom he received the Lordship of Annandale. Robert, the fourth Lord, married a niece of William the Lion, and on this marriage was based the claim through which the seventh Lord of Annandale and third of Carrick became King Robert the Bruce. It was his decisive victory over the English at Bannockburn in 1314 that finally established the independence of Scotland. From the Bruces of Clackmannan is descended the Earl of Elgin, the present Head of the Family. (view tartan)
Bruce Modern
Sir Robert de Brus, Knight, who accompanied William the Conqueror to England, is the progenitor of this Family. His son, Robert de Brus, was Companion-at-Arms to Prince David, later King of Scots, from whom he received the Lordship of Annandale. Robert, the fourth Lord, married a niece of William the Lion, and on this marriage was based the claim through which the seventh Lord of Annandale and third of Carrick became King Robert the Bruce. It was his decisive victory over the English at Bannockburn in 1314 that finally established the independence of Scotland. From the Bruces of Clackmannan is descended the Earl of Elgin, the present Head of the Family. (view tartan)
Bruce Of Kinnaird Ancient
Sir Robert de Brus, Knight, who accompanied William the Conqueror to England, is the progenitor of this Family. His son, Robert de Brus, was Companion-at-Arms to Prince David, later King of Scots, from whom he received the Lordship of Annandale. Robert, the fourth Lord, married a niece of William the Lion, and on this marriage was based the claim through which the seventh Lord of Annandale and third of Carrick became King Robert the Bruce. It was his decisive victory over the English at Bannockburn in 1314 that finally established the independence of Scotland. From the Bruces of Clackmannan is descended the Earl of Elgin, the present Head of the Family. (view tartan)
Bruce Weathered
Sir Robert de Brus, Knight, who accompanied William the Conqueror to England, is the progenitor of this Family. His son, Robert de Brus, was Companion-at-Arms to Prince David, later King of Scots, from whom he received the Lordship of Annandale. Robert, the fourth Lord, married a niece of William the Lion, and on this marriage was based the claim through which the seventh Lord of Annandale and third of Carrick became King Robert the Bruce. It was his decisive victory over the English at Bannockburn in 1314 that finally established the independence of Scotland. From the Bruces of Clackmannan is descended the Earl of Elgin, the present Head of the Family. (view tartan)
Buchan Ancient
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Buchan Hunting Modern
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Buchan Hunting Weathered
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Buchanan Hunting Ancient
For close on 700 years the lands of Buchanan on the east side of Loch Lomond were possessed by the Buchanans. In Gaelic the name is known as Mac a Chanonaich meaning ldquo;Son of the Canon. The clan historian claims that the lands of Buchanan were given to the chief, for his services against the Danes, by King Malcolm II. They supported King Robert the Bruce during the War of Independence and also fought at the battles of Flodden, Pinkie and Langside. It is claimed that there were Buchanans among the 7,000 Scots who assisted the French King after the Battle of Agincourt in 1421. (view tartan)
Buchanan Hunting Modern
For close on 700 years the lands of Buchanan on the east side of Loch Lomond were possessed by the Buchanans. In Gaelic the name is known as Mac a Chanonaich meaning ldquo;Son of the Canon. The clan historian claims that the lands of Buchanan were given to the chief, for his services against the Danes, by King Malcolm II. They supported King Robert the Bruce during the War of Independence and also fought at the battles of Flodden, Pinkie and Langside. It is claimed that there were Buchanans among the 7,000 Scots who assisted the French King after the Battle of Agincourt in 1421. (view tartan)
Buchanan Modern
For close on 700 years the lands of Buchanan on the east side of Loch Lomond were possessed by the Buchanans. In Gaelic the name is known as Mac a Chanonaich meaning ldquo;Son of the Canon. The clan historian claims that the lands of Buchanan were given to the chief, for his services against the Danes, by King Malcolm II. They supported King Robert the Bruce during the War of Independence and also fought at the battles of Flodden, Pinkie and Langside. It is claimed that there were Buchanans among the 7,000 Scots who assisted the French King after the Battle of Agincourt in 1421. (view tartan)
Buchanan Modern
For close on 700 years the lands of Buchanan on the east side of Loch Lomond were possessed by the Buchanans. In Gaelic the name is known as Mac a Chanonaich meaning ldquo;Son of the Canon. The clan historian claims that the lands of Buchanan were given to the chief, for his services against the Danes, by King Malcolm II. They supported King Robert the Bruce during the War of Independence and also fought at the battles of Flodden, Pinkie and Langside. It is claimed that there were Buchanans among the 7,000 Scots who assisted the French King after the Battle of Agincourt in 1421. (view tartan)
Buchanan Old Ancient
For close on 700 years the lands of Buchanan on the east side of Loch Lomond were possessed by the Buchanans. In Gaelic the name is known as Mac a Chanonaich meaning ldquo;Son of the Canon. The clan historian claims that the lands of Buchanan were given to the chief, for his services against the Danes, by King Malcolm II. They supported King Robert the Bruce during the War of Independence and also fought at the battles of Flodden, Pinkie and Langside. It is claimed that there were Buchanans among the 7,000 Scots who assisted the French King after the Battle of Agincourt in 1421. (view tartan)
Buchanan Old Weathered
For close on 700 years the lands of Buchanan on the east side of Loch Lomond were possessed by the Buchanans. In Gaelic the name is known as Mac a Chanonaich meaning ldquo;Son of the Canon. The clan historian claims that the lands of Buchanan were given to the chief, for his services against the Danes, by King Malcolm II. They supported King Robert the Bruce during the War of Independence and also fought at the battles of Flodden, Pinkie and Langside. It is claimed that there were Buchanans among the 7,000 Scots who assisted the French King after the Battle of Agincourt in 1421. (view tartan)
Buchanan Weathered
For close on 700 years the lands of Buchanan on the east side of Loch Lomond were possessed by the Buchanans. In Gaelic the name is known as Mac a Chanonaich meaning ldquo;Son of the Canon. The clan historian claims that the lands of Buchanan were given to the chief, for his services against the Danes, by King Malcolm II. They supported King Robert the Bruce during the War of Independence and also fought at the battles of Flodden, Pinkie and Langside. It is claimed that there were Buchanans among the 7,000 Scots who assisted the French King after the Battle of Agincourt in 1421. (view tartan)
Burnett Ancient
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Burnett Modern
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Burnett Weathered
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Burns Check
Robert Burns, was born at Alloway on 25th January, 1759. His family came to Ayrshire and built the auld clay biggan in Alloway, where he spent the first seven years of his life. Burns and his brother Gilbert moved to Mossgiel, near Mauchline, where many of his immortal verses were penned. Thereafter, he moved to Ellisland, near Dumfries, and died in the Burns House in Irish Street, Dumfries, at the early age of 37. The late Baron Marchand of Messrs George Harrison amp; Co. of Edinburgh, thought it fit and proper that our National Bard should have his own check. The design contains the Shepherd Check of black and white, to remind us of the farmer; a Hodden Grey overcheck recalls the famous line in his poem quot;A man's a man for a' that,quot; and two soft green lines through the overcheck symbolise the fields and meadows where most of his thoughts were born. The check was first produced in the bi-centenary year of 1959. (view tartan)
Caledonia Ancient
It is possible that this was one of the tartans favoured by the fashionable ladies of Edinburgh, who disapproved of the Act of Union and were anti-government and pro-Jacobite in their sympathies. As a sign of their feelings, they were wont to wear tartan plaids and silken scarves. Since it belongs to no clan, it is one of those setts which anyone not possessing a tartan of his or her own is entitled to wear. Its age is unknown but it almost certainly existed at the beginning of the 18th century. (view tartan)
Caledonia Modern
It is possible that this was one of the tartans favoured by the fashionable ladies of Edinburgh, who disapproved of the Act of Union and were anti-government and pro-Jacobite in their sympathies. As a sign of their feelings, they were wont to wear tartan plaids and silken scarves. Since it belongs to no clan, it is one of those setts which anyone not possessing a tartan of his or her own is entitled to wear. Its age is unknown but it almost certainly existed at the beginning of the 18th century. (view tartan)
Cambell Clan Modern
The Clan Campbell were powerful in the West of Scotland and in Argyllshire. Known as the race of Diarmid, they received the Lordship of Lochow in the 13th century. Colin Campbell of Lochow, progenitor of the Campbells of Argyll, was knighted in 1280. Later chiefs were Earls of Argyll and in 1701 William of Orange conferred a Dukedom on the 10th Earl. The 9th Earl was beheaded in 1685 for his part in the Monmouth Rebellion. The Campbells took a prominent part in the affairs of state and held high positions, including Hereditary Lord Justice General and Admiral of the Western Coasts and Isles of Scotland. The 9th Duke married H.R.H. Princess Louise, daughter of Queen Victoria, in 1871. (view tartan)
Cambell Clann Weathered
The Clan Campbell were powerful in the West of Scotland and in Argyllshire. Known as the race of Diarmid, they received the Lordship of Lochow in the 13th century. Colin Campbell of Lochow, progenitor of the Campbells of Argyll, was knighted in 1280. Later chiefs were Earls of Argyll and in 1701 William of Orange conferred a Dukedom on the 10th Earl. The 9th Earl was beheaded in 1685 for his part in the Monmouth Rebellion. The Campbells took a prominent part in the affairs of state and held high positions, including Hereditary Lord Justice General and Admiral of the Western Coasts and Isles of Scotland. The 9th Duke married H.R.H. Princess Louise, daughter of Queen Victoria, in 1871. (view tartan)
Cameron Clan Ancient
Lochaber is the home of this famous Highland clan and the Achnacarry Castle is the residence of the Chief. Camerons fought in the army of the Lord of the Isles at Haraw in 1411. They engaged in clan feuds and had the reputation of being ldquo;fiercer than fierceness. They were extremely loyal to the Royal Stewarts and Sir Ewan, born about 1629, was one of their most renowned chiefs. He refused to submit to the authority of Oliver Cromwell and his clan were allowed to retain their arms without taking any oath ldquo;but his word of honour. His grandson, Donald, was the celebrated ldquo;Gentle Lochiel who was first to raise his clan for Prince Charlie. The Cameron chiefs have been known as ldquo;of Lochiel since the 16th century. (view tartan)
Cameron Clan Modern
Lochaber is the home of this famous Highland clan and the Achnacarry Castle is the residence of the Chief. Camerons fought in the army of the Lord of the Isles at Haraw in 1411. They engaged in clan feuds and had the reputation of being ldquo;fiercer than fierceness. They were extremely loyal to the Royal Stewarts and Sir Ewan, born about 1629, was one of their most renowned chiefs. He refused to submit to the authority of Oliver Cromwell and his clan were allowed to retain their arms without taking any oath ldquo;but his word of honour. His grandson, Donald, was the celebrated ldquo;Gentle Lochiel who was first to raise his clan for Prince Charlie. The Cameron chiefs have been known as ldquo;of Lochiel since the 16th century. (view tartan)
Cameron Hunting Ancient
Lochaber is the home of this famous Highland clan and the Achnacarry Castle is the residence of the Chief. Camerons fought in the army of the Lord of the Isles at Haraw in 1411. They engaged in clan feuds and had the reputation of being ldquo;fiercer than fierceness. They were extremely loyal to the Royal Stewarts and Sir Ewan, born about 1629, was one of their most renowned chiefs. He refused to submit to the authority of Oliver Cromwell and his clan were allowed to retain their arms without taking any oath ldquo;but his word of honour. His grandson, Donald, was the celebrated ldquo;Gentle Lochiel who was first to raise his clan for Prince Charlie. The Cameron chiefs have been known as ldquo;of Lochiel since the 16th century. (view tartan)
Cameron Hunting Weathered
Lochaber is the home of this famous Highland clan and the Achnacarry Castle is the residence of the Chief. Camerons fought in the army of the Lord of the Isles at Haraw in 1411. They engaged in clan feuds and had the reputation of being ldquo;fiercer than fierceness. They were extremely loyal to the Royal Stewarts and Sir Ewan, born about 1629, was one of their most renowned chiefs. He refused to submit to the authority of Oliver Cromwell and his clan were allowed to retain their arms without taking any oath ldquo;but his word of honour. His grandson, Donald, was the celebrated ldquo;Gentle Lochiel who was first to raise his clan for Prince Charlie. The Cameron chiefs have been known as ldquo;of Lochiel since the 16th century. (view tartan)
Cameron of Erracht Ancient
Lochaber is the home of this famous Highland clan and the Achnacarry Castle is the residence of the Chief. Camerons fought in the army of the Lord of the Isles at Haraw in 1411. They engaged in clan feuds and had the reputation of being ldquo;fiercer than fierceness. They were extremely loyal to the Royal Stewarts and Sir Ewan, born about 1629, was one of their most renowned chiefs. He refused to submit to the authority of Oliver Cromwell and his clan were allowed to retain their arms without taking any oath ldquo;but his word of honour. His grandson, Donald, was the celebrated ldquo;Gentle Lochiel who was first to raise his clan for Prince Charlie. The Cameron chiefs have been known as ldquo;of Lochiel since the 16th century. (view tartan)
Cameron of Erracht Modern
Lochaber is the home of this famous Highland clan and the Achnacarry Castle is the residence of the Chief. Camerons fought in the army of the Lord of the Isles at Haraw in 1411. They engaged in clan feuds and had the reputation of being ldquo;fiercer than fierceness. They were extremely loyal to the Royal Stewarts and Sir Ewan, born about 1629, was one of their most renowned chiefs. He refused to submit to the authority of Oliver Cromwell and his clan were allowed to retain their arms without taking any oath ldquo;but his word of honour. His grandson, Donald, was the celebrated ldquo;Gentle Lochiel who was first to raise his clan for Prince Charlie. The Cameron chiefs have been known as ldquo;of Lochiel since the 16th century. (view tartan)
Cameron of Erracht Weathered
Lochaber is the home of this famous Highland clan and the Achnacarry Castle is the residence of the Chief. Camerons fought in the army of the Lord of the Isles at Haraw in 1411. They engaged in clan feuds and had the reputation of being ldquo;fiercer than fierceness. They were extremely loyal to the Royal Stewarts and Sir Ewan, born about 1629, was one of their most renowned chiefs. He refused to submit to the authority of Oliver Cromwell and his clan were allowed to retain their arms without taking any oath ldquo;but his word of honour. His grandson, Donald, was the celebrated ldquo;Gentle Lochiel who was first to raise his clan for Prince Charlie. The Cameron chiefs have been known as ldquo;of Lochiel since the 16th century. (view tartan)
Cameron of Lochiel Ancient
Lochaber is the home of this famous Highland clan and the Achnacarry Castle is the residence of the Chief. Camerons fought in the army of the Lord of the Isles at Haraw in 1411. They engaged in clan feuds and had the reputation of being ldquo;fiercer than fierceness. They were extremely loyal to the Royal Stewarts and Sir Ewan, born about 1629, was one of their most renowned chiefs. He refused to submit to the authority of Oliver Cromwell and his clan were allowed to retain their arms without taking any oath ldquo;but his word of honour. His grandson, Donald, was the celebrated ldquo;Gentle Lochiel who was first to raise his clan for Prince Charlie. The Cameron chiefs have been known as ldquo;of Lochiel since the 16th century. (view tartan)
Cameron of Lochiel Modern
Lochaber is the home of this famous Highland clan and the Achnacarry Castle is the residence of the Chief. Camerons fought in the army of the Lord of the Isles at Haraw in 1411. They engaged in clan feuds and had the reputation of being ldquo;fiercer than fierceness. They were extremely loyal to the Royal Stewarts and Sir Ewan, born about 1629, was one of their most renowned chiefs. He refused to submit to the authority of Oliver Cromwell and his clan were allowed to retain their arms without taking any oath ldquo;but his word of honour. His grandson, Donald, was the celebrated ldquo;Gentle Lochiel who was first to raise his clan for Prince Charlie. The Cameron chiefs have been known as ldquo;of Lochiel since the 16th century. (view tartan)
Cameron of Lochiel Weathered
Lochaber is the home of this famous Highland clan and the Achnacarry Castle is the residence of the Chief. Camerons fought in the army of the Lord of the Isles at Haraw in 1411. They engaged in clan feuds and had the reputation of being ldquo;fiercer than fierceness. They were extremely loyal to the Royal Stewarts and Sir Ewan, born about 1629, was one of their most renowned chiefs. He refused to submit to the authority of Oliver Cromwell and his clan were allowed to retain their arms without taking any oath ldquo;but his word of honour. His grandson, Donald, was the celebrated ldquo;Gentle Lochiel who was first to raise his clan for Prince Charlie. The Cameron chiefs have been known as ldquo;of Lochiel since the 16th century. (view tartan)
Campbell Clan Ancient
The Clan Campbell were powerful in the West of Scotland and in Argyllshire. Known as the race of Diarmid, they received the Lordship of Lochow in the 13th century. Colin Campbell of Lochow, progenitor of the Campbells of Argyll, was knighted in 1280. Later chiefs were Earls of Argyll and in 1701 William of Orange conferred a Dukedom on the 10th Earl. The 9th Earl was beheaded in 1685 for his part in the Monmouth Rebellion. The Campbells took a prominent part in the affairs of state and held high positions, including Hereditary Lord Justice General and Admiral of the Western Coasts and Isles of Scotland. The 9th Duke married H.R.H. Princess Louise, daughter of Queen Victoria, in 1871. (view tartan)
Campbell Dress Ancient
The Clan Campbell were powerful in the West of Scotland and in Argyllshire. Known as the race of Diarmid, they received the Lordship of Lochow in the 13th century. Colin Campbell of Lochow, progenitor of the Campbells of Argyll, was knighted in 1280. Later chiefs were Earls of Argyll and in 1701 William of Orange conferred a Dukedom on the 10th Earl. The 9th Earl was beheaded in 1685 for his part in the Monmouth Rebellion. The Campbells took a prominent part in the affairs of state and held high positions, including Hereditary Lord Justice General and Admiral of the Western Coasts and Isles of Scotland. The 9th Duke married H.R.H. Princess Louise, daughter of Queen Victoria, in 1871. (view tartan)
Campbell Dress Modern
The Clan Campbell were powerful in the West of Scotland and in Argyllshire. Known as the race of Diarmid, they received the Lordship of Lochow in the 13th century. Colin Campbell of Lochow, progenitor of the Campbells of Argyll, was knighted in 1280. Later chiefs were Earls of Argyll and in 1701 William of Orange conferred a Dukedom on the 10th Earl. The 9th Earl was beheaded in 1685 for his part in the Monmouth Rebellion. The Campbells took a prominent part in the affairs of state and held high positions, including Hereditary Lord Justice General and Admiral of the Western Coasts and Isles of Scotland. The 9th Duke married H.R.H. Princess Louise, daughter of Queen Victoria, in 1871. (view tartan)
Campbell of Argyll Ancient
The Clan Campbell were powerful in the West of Scotland and in Argyllshire. Known as the race of Diarmid, they received the Lordship of Lochow in the 13th century. Colin Campbell of Lochow, progenitor of the Campbells of Argyll, was knighted in 1280. Later chiefs were Earls of Argyll and in 1701 William of Orange conferred a Dukedom on the 10th Earl. The 9th Earl was beheaded in 1685 for his part in the Monmouth Rebellion. The Campbells took a prominent part in the affairs of state and held high positions, including Hereditary Lord Justice General and Admiral of the Western Coasts and Isles of Scotland. The 9th Duke married H.R.H. Princess Louise, daughter of Queen Victoria, in 1871. (view tartan)
Campbell of Argyll Modern
The Clan Campbell were powerful in the West of Scotland and in Argyllshire. Known as the race of Diarmid, they received the Lordship of Lochow in the 13th century. Colin Campbell of Lochow, progenitor of the Campbells of Argyll, was knighted in 1280. Later chiefs were Earls of Argyll and in 1701 William of Orange conferred a Dukedom on the 10th Earl. The 9th Earl was beheaded in 1685 for his part in the Monmouth Rebellion. The Campbells took a prominent part in the affairs of state and held high positions, including Hereditary Lord Justice General and Admiral of the Western Coasts and Isles of Scotland. The 9th Duke married H.R.H. Princess Louise, daughter of Queen Victoria, in 1871. (view tartan)
Campbell of Argyll Weathered
The Clan Campbell were powerful in the West of Scotland and in Argyllshire. Known as the race of Diarmid, they received the Lordship of Lochow in the 13th century. Colin Campbell of Lochow, progenitor of the Campbells of Argyll, was knighted in 1280. Later chiefs were Earls of Argyll and in 1701 William of Orange conferred a Dukedom on the 10th Earl. The 9th Earl was beheaded in 1685 for his part in the Monmouth Rebellion. The Campbells took a prominent part in the affairs of state and held high positions, including Hereditary Lord Justice General and Admiral of the Western Coasts and Isles of Scotland. The 9th Duke married H.R.H. Princess Louise, daughter of Queen Victoria, in 1871. (view tartan)
Campbell of Cawdor Ancient
The Clan Campbell were powerful in the West of Scotland and in Argyllshire. Known as the race of Diarmid, they received the Lordship of Lochow in the 13th century. Colin Campbell of Lochow, progenitor of the Campbells of Argyll, was knighted in 1280. Later chiefs were Earls of Argyll and in 1701 William of Orange conferred a Dukedom on the 10th Earl. The 9th Earl was beheaded in 1685 for his part in the Monmouth Rebellion. The Campbells took a prominent part in the affairs of state and held high positions, including Hereditary Lord Justice General and Admiral of the Western Coasts and Isles of Scotland. The 9th Duke married H.R.H. Princess Louise, daughter of Queen Victoria, in 1871. (view tartan)
Campbell of Cawdor Modern
The Clan Campbell were powerful in the West of Scotland and in Argyllshire. Known as the race of Diarmid, they received the Lordship of Lochow in the 13th century. Colin Campbell of Lochow, progenitor of the Campbells of Argyll, was knighted in 1280. Later chiefs were Earls of Argyll and in 1701 William of Orange conferred a Dukedom on the 10th Earl. The 9th Earl was beheaded in 1685 for his part in the Monmouth Rebellion. The Campbells took a prominent part in the affairs of state and held high positions, including Hereditary Lord Justice General and Admiral of the Western Coasts and Isles of Scotland. The 9th Duke married H.R.H. Princess Louise, daughter of Queen Victoria, in 1871. (view tartan)
Campbell of Cawdor Weathered
The Clan Campbell were powerful in the West of Scotland and in Argyllshire. Known as the race of Diarmid, they received the Lordship of Lochow in the 13th century. Colin Campbell of Lochow, progenitor of the Campbells of Argyll, was knighted in 1280. Later chiefs were Earls of Argyll and in 1701 William of Orange conferred a Dukedom on the 10th Earl. The 9th Earl was beheaded in 1685 for his part in the Monmouth Rebellion. The Campbells took a prominent part in the affairs of state and held high positions, including Hereditary Lord Justice General and Admiral of the Western Coasts and Isles of Scotland. The 9th Duke married H.R.H. Princess Louise, daughter of Queen Victoria, in 1871. (view tartan)
Campbell of Louden Modern
The Clan Campbell were powerful in the West of Scotland and in Argyllshire. Known as the race of Diarmid, they received the Lordship of Lochow in the 13th century. Colin Campbell of Lochow, progenitor of the Campbells of Argyll, was knighted in 1280. Later chiefs were Earls of Argyll and in 1701 William of Orange conferred a Dukedom on the 10th Earl. The 9th Earl was beheaded in 1685 for his part in the Monmouth Rebellion. The Campbells took a prominent part in the affairs of state and held high positions, including Hereditary Lord Justice General and Admiral of the Western Coasts and Isles of Scotland. The 9th Duke married H.R.H. Princess Louise, daughter of Queen Victoria, in 1871. (view tartan)
Campbell Old Ancient
The Clan Campbell were powerful in the West of Scotland and in Argyllshire. Known as the race of Diarmid, they received the Lordship of Lochow in the 13th century. Colin Campbell of Lochow, progenitor of the Campbells of Argyll, was knighted in 1280. Later chiefs were Earls of Argyll and in 1701 William of Orange conferred a Dukedom on the 10th Earl. The 9th Earl was beheaded in 1685 for his part in the Monmouth Rebellion. The Campbells took a prominent part in the affairs of state and held high positions, including Hereditary Lord Justice General and Admiral of the Western Coasts and Isles of Scotland. The 9th Duke married H.R.H. Princess Louise, daughter of Queen Victoria, in 1871. (view tartan)
Campbell Old Weathered
The Clan Campbell were powerful in the West of Scotland and in Argyllshire. Known as the race of Diarmid, they received the Lordship of Lochow in the 13th century. Colin Campbell of Lochow, progenitor of the Campbells of Argyll, was knighted in 1280. Later chiefs were Earls of Argyll and in 1701 William of Orange conferred a Dukedom on the 10th Earl. The 9th Earl was beheaded in 1685 for his part in the Monmouth Rebellion. The Campbells took a prominent part in the affairs of state and held high positions, including Hereditary Lord Justice General and Admiral of the Western Coasts and Isles of Scotland. The 9th Duke married H.R.H. Princess Louise, daughter of Queen Victoria, in 1871. (view tartan)
Carmichael Ancient
(view tartan)
Carnegie Modern
This name comes from the old barony of Carnegie in the parish of Carmyllie, Angus. The original name of the Carnegies of Southesk was de Ballinhard, but on acquiring the lands of Carnegie about 1340, they adopted the new surname. Sir David Carnegie was created Earl of Southesk by Charles I, whose cause he espoused. The 5th Earl, present at the raising of the Standard on the Braes of Mar in 1715, forfeited his estates; he was the hero of the song The Pied Piper o Dundee. Later, the family was able to buy back the estates. One of the best-known men of the name is Andrew Carnegie, 1837-1919, the Amercio-Scottish multi-millionaire. (view tartan)
Chattan Ancient
This clan was formed by a confederation of Clans - orginally composed of the MacIntoshes, Davidsons, MacPgersons, MacGillivrays and MacBeans and later also included the Farquharsons. Gillichattan Mor is said to have been the first chief of the clan. His daughter, and only offspring, Eva, married Angus, 6th Laird of MacIntosh in 1291. The Laird of MacIntosh thus became Captain of Clan Chattaan. For over 200 years the Clans of MacIntosh and MacPherson competed for the chieftainship of Clan Chattan and in 1672 Cluny MacPherson offically claimed the Chieftainship of Clan Chattan: this however was successfully protested by the Chief of Clan MacIntosh. It was in 1947 that Duncan Alexander Eliot MacIntosh was granted the Arms of the Clan Chattan by the Lord Lyon. Badge - Red Whortleberry. (view tartan)
Chisholm Clan Ancient
Norman in origin the first of this clan settled in Roxburghshire sometime about or before the 13th century. Sir Robert de Chisholm was Constable of Urquhart Castle in the 14th century and his son, who married the heiress of Erchless, was the progenitor of the Chisholms of Comer and Strathglass. For their participation in the Jacobite Rising of 1715 the Chisholm estates were forfeited but, following a pardon, they were restored to them in 1727. The clan supported Prince Charlie during the 1745 Rising and one of the seven men who hid the Prince in their Glenmoriston cave after the Battle of Culloden, was a Chisholm. Erchless Castle, the old home of the chiefs, has now passed out of Chisholm possession. (view tartan)
Chisholm Clan Modern
Norman in origin the first of this clan settled in Roxburghshire sometime about or before the 13th century. Sir Robert de Chisholm was Constable of Urquhart Castle in the 14th century and his son, who married the heiress of Erchless, was the progenitor of the Chisholms of Comer and Strathglass. For their participation in the Jacobite Rising of 1715 the Chisholm estates were forfeited but, following a pardon, they were restored to them in 1727. The clan supported Prince Charlie during the 1745 Rising and one of the seven men who hid the Prince in their Glenmoriston cave after the Battle of Culloden, was a Chisholm. Erchless Castle, the old home of the chiefs, has now passed out of Chisholm possession. (view tartan)
Chisholm Hunting Ancient
Norman in origin the first of this clan settled in Roxburghshire sometime about or before the 13th century. Sir Robert de Chisholm was Constable of Urquhart Castle in the 14th century and his son, who married the heiress of Erchless, was the progenitor of the Chisholms of Comer and Strathglass. For their participation in the Jacobite Rising of 1715 the Chisholm estates were forfeited but, following a pardon, they were restored to them in 1727. The clan supported Prince Charlie during the 1745 Rising and one of the seven men who hid the Prince in their Glenmoriston cave after the Battle of Culloden, was a Chisholm. Erchless Castle, the old home of the chiefs, has now passed out of Chisholm possession. (view tartan)
Chisholm Hunting Modern
Norman in origin the first of this clan settled in Roxburghshire sometime about or before the 13th century. Sir Robert de Chisholm was Constable of Urquhart Castle in the 14th century and his son, who married the heiress of Erchless, was the progenitor of the Chisholms of Comer and Strathglass. For their participation in the Jacobite Rising of 1715 the Chisholm estates were forfeited but, following a pardon, they were restored to them in 1727. The clan supported Prince Charlie during the 1745 Rising and one of the seven men who hid the Prince in their Glenmoriston cave after the Battle of Culloden, was a Chisholm. Erchless Castle, the old home of the chiefs, has now passed out of Chisholm possession. (view tartan)
Christie Ancient
The surname Christie is a diminutive of Christian, and perhaps of Christopher, and is very common in Fife which appears to have been the early home of the family. Chrystie, a variant spelling, was adopted by a well-known family in Old Stirling. A John Chrystie was admitted Burgess of Aberdeen in 1530 and Cristina Cristie was a tenant under the Bishop of Moray in 1547. The name is now widespread throughout Scotland. (view tartan)
Clark Ancient
This name was not originally a surname but signified a man in a religious order, or one who made his living by writing, but was something more than a scrivener. The name was common all over the Lowlands but, until the 14th century, it describes a manOtilde;s occupation rather than his family. In the 15th century it is definitely a surname, as in the case of Robert Clark, a shipmaster of Leith, in 1446. Families of Clarks attached themselves to several clans, first, no doubt, as men of business to the chiefs. Both Clan Chattan and Clan Cameron admit them as septs. The name is spelt variously as Clark, Clarke and Clerk. (view tartan)
Clergy Ancient
It is well known that in olden times the Clergy of the Highlands wore the Highland dress and carried arms. In the 18th century a Skye clergyman attended church dressed in full Highland garb carrying a two-handed sword and followed by his servant carrying bow and arrows. In earlier times many attempts were made to prevent Highland clergy wearing tartan and to force them to wear conventional ministerial habit. These, however, had only limited success. The Clergy tartan is sometimes called quot;The Priest's Settquot;, but in the Highlands is known as quot;Breacan nan Cleirachquot; ndash; the tartan of the Clergy. (view tartan)
Clergy Modern
It is well known that in olden times the Clergy of the Highlands wore the Highland dress and carried arms. In the 18th century a Skye clergyman attended church dressed in full Highland garb carrying a two-handed sword and followed by his servant carrying bow and arrows. In earlier times many attempts were made to prevent Highland clergy wearing tartan and to force them to wear conventional ministerial habit. These, however, had only limited success. The Clergy tartan is sometimes called quot;The Priest's Settquot;, but in the Highlands is known as quot;Breacan nan Cleirachquot; ndash; the tartan of the Clergy. (view tartan)
Cochrane Ancient
The Cochrane Clan should really be known as the Cochrane DunDonald Clan. The name DunDonald comes into the title of the Cochranes from the Barony of that name in Renfrewshire: the castle of which was in Cochrane possession at the time of the ennoblement and which was theirs for over five centuries. The Cochrane tartan is not a very old tartan. It is alleged to have been discovered in the foundations of an old house at Killin in Perthshire in 1934 but this story has never been verified. (view tartan)
Cochrane Modern
The Cochrane Clan should really be known as the Cochrane DunDonald Clan. The name DunDonald comes into the title of the Cochranes from the Barony of that name in Renfrewshire: the castle of which was in Cochrane possession at the time of the ennoblement and which was theirs for over five centuries. The Cochrane tartan is not a very old tartan. It is alleged to have been discovered in the foundations of an old house at Killin in Perthshire in 1934 but this story has never been verified. (view tartan)
Cockburn Ancient
Berwickshire is the home of the Cockburns who derive their name from a placename near Duns. There is record of Cockburns in Berwickshire in the 12th century. Sir Alexander Cockburn was Keeper of the Great Seal between 1389 and 1396. Sir William Cockburn of Langton was granted the Barony of Langton in 1595, together with the office of Principal Usher. Later, some dispute having arisen, the office of Principal Usher was, about 1641, jointly shared with Colonel Cunningham's life-rent in the joint office, the 2nd Baron Langton received a new grant of the office. Cockburn of Ormiston was an important branch of the family. (view tartan)
Cockburn Modern
Berwickshire is the home of the Cockburns who derive their name from a placename near Duns. There is record of Cockburns in Berwickshire in the 12th century. Sir Alexander Cockburn was Keeper of the Great Seal between 1389 and 1396. Sir William Cockburn of Langton was granted the Barony of Langton in 1595, together with the office of Principal Usher. Later, some dispute having arisen, the office of Principal Usher was, about 1641, jointly shared with Colonel Cunningham's life-rent in the joint office, the 2nd Baron Langton received a new grant of the office. Cockburn of Ormiston was an important branch of the family. (view tartan)
Colquhoun Ancient
This clan takes its name from the lands of Colquhoun which came into their possession during the reign of King Alexander II. Later they acquired the lands of Luss, on the side of Loch Lomond, and thereafter the chief became known as Colquhoun of Luss. After a desperate battle with the MacGregors in 1602 the Colquhouns sought to trap the MacGregors but were defeated and their chief killed. Following this affair the MacGregors were proscribed and their name forbidden under pain of death. Sir John Colquhoun, known as the ldquo;Black Cock of the West was an able and learned politician. (view tartan)
Colquhoun Modern
This clan takes its name from the lands of Colquhoun which came into their possession during the reign of King Alexander II. Later they acquired the lands of Luss, on the side of Loch Lomond, and thereafter the chief became known as Colquhoun of Luss. After a desperate battle with the MacGregors in 1602 the Colquhouns sought to trap the MacGregors but were defeated and their chief killed. Following this affair the MacGregors were proscribed and their name forbidden under pain of death. Sir John Colquhoun, known as the ldquo;Black Cock of the West was an able and learned politician. (view tartan)
Cooper Ancient
This name is found in the records of most parts of Scotland. Its spelling varies: Cooper, Coupar, Couper and Cowper are all usual. It is thought that the names largely derive from the town of Cupar in Fife, since most of the early recordings refer to people and places in Fife. But the trade of cooper, or barrel-maker, certainly contributed many lines to the family. For example, a payment made in 1329 is to Alanus Cuparius (Alan the Cooper). However, with the exception of a few families who can trace their tree back to the 15th century, the two origins are now indistinguishable and all Coopers, of whatever spelling, may be considered of the same family. One of their most distinguished sons was the poet, William Cowper, who wrote . . . I am originally of the same shire (Fife) and a family of my name is still there. (view tartan)
Cooper Modern
This name is found in the records of most parts of Scotland. Its spelling varies: Cooper, Coupar, Couper and Cowper are all usual. It is thought that the names largely derive from the town of Cupar in Fife, since most of the early recordings refer to people and places in Fife. But the trade of cooper, or barrel-maker, certainly contributed many lines to the family. For example, a payment made in 1329 is to Alanus Cuparius (Alan the Cooper). However, with the exception of a few families who can trace their tree back to the 15th century, the two origins are now indistinguishable and all Coopers, of whatever spelling, may be considered of the same family. One of their most distinguished sons was the poet, William Cowper, who wrote . . . I am originally of the same shire (Fife) and a family of my name is still there. (view tartan)
Cornish Hunting Modern
Each colour woven into the Cornish National Tartan has a special significance. The white cross on a black background is for the banner of St.Piran, the patron saint of tinners. Black and gold are the colours of the ancient Cornish kings, whilst royal blue and gold were the colours of the wrestlers standard. Red is for the legs and beak of the national bird, the chough. (view tartan)
Cornish National
Each colour woven into the Cornish National Tartan has a special significance. The white cross on a black background is for the banner of St.Piran, the patron saint of tinners. Black and gold were the colours of the ancient Cornish kings; red for the legs and beak of the national bird, the chough; and, finally, blue for the sea surrounding Cornwall. (view tartan)
Craig Ancient
This name has a local origin, being taken from any crag, or (in Scots) craig, near which a man might have his dwelling. In the 15th century, no less than three families claimed to be of that Ilk, that is, the chiefly House. From William the Lions reign onwards, the name occurs in old records, and, in the 15th and 16th centuries, it is particularly common in the Edinburgh district. There were Craigs too in Aberdeenshire as well as in Berwick and St. Andrews. John Craig was a colleague of John Knox (view tartan)
Crawford Ancient
This surname is a territorial one from the barony of the same name in Lanarkshire where the family were settled about the 12th century. The mother of the Scottish Patriot, Sir William Wallace, was a Crawford. The Crawfords loyally supported Robert the Bruce and Sir Reginald Crawford, cousin of Sir William Wallace, was, for his loyalty to the Scottish cause, executed at Carlisle in 1307. Two of the oldest branches of this family are the Craufurds of Crawfurdland, and Crawfurds of Kilbirnie. The title of Earl of Crawford was first conferred on Sir David Lindsay in 1398. (view tartan)
Crawford Modern
This surname is a territorial one from the barony of the same name in Lanarkshire where the family were settled about the 12th century. The mother of the Scottish Patriot, Sir William Wallace, was a Crawford. The Crawfords loyally supported Robert the Bruce and Sir Reginald Crawford, cousin of Sir William Wallace, was, for his loyalty to the Scottish cause, executed at Carlisle in 1307. Two of the oldest branches of this family are the Craufurds of Crawfurdland, and Crawfurds of Kilbirnie. The title of Earl of Crawford was first conferred on Sir David Lindsay in 1398. (view tartan)
Crawford Weathered
This surname is a territorial one from the barony of the same name in Lanarkshire where the family were settled about the 12th century. The mother of the Scottish Patriot, Sir William Wallace, was a Crawford. The Crawfords loyally supported Robert the Bruce and Sir Reginald Crawford, cousin of Sir William Wallace, was, for his loyalty to the Scottish cause, executed at Carlisle in 1307. Two of the oldest branches of this family are the Craufurds of Crawfurdland, and Crawfurds of Kilbirnie. The title of Earl of Crawford was first conferred on Sir David Lindsay in 1398. (view tartan)
Cumming Ancient
The Cummings (or Comyns to use the ancient spelling) were of Norman descent and the progenitor of the clan was Richard Comyn who came to Scotland in the 12th century. His descendant, Sir John, Lord of Badenoch, was known as the quot;Red Coymnquot; and his son as the quot;Black Comynquot;. The quot;Black Comynquot; was one of the competitors for the crown of Scotland in 1296. Their opposition to King Robert the Bruce led to their extermination and the Cummings of Altyre became the chief branch. They took an active part in public affairs and engaged in clan warfare. In 1657 Robert of Altyre married a daughter of Sir Ludovick Gordon of Gordonstoun, and his great-grandson, who was created a baronet in 1804, took the name of Gordon-Cumming. (view tartan)
Cumming Hunting
The Cummings (or Comyns to use the ancient spelling) were of Norman descent and the progenitor of the clan was Richard Comyn who came to Scotland in the 12th century. His descendant, Sir John, Lord of Badenoch, was known as the quot;Red Coymnquot; and his son as the quot;Black Comynquot;. The quot;Black Comynquot; was one of the competitors for the crown of Scotland in 1296. Their opposition to King Robert the Bruce led to their extermination and the Cummings of Altyre became the chief branch. They took an active part in public affairs and engaged in clan warfare. In 1657 Robert of Altyre married a daughter of Sir Ludovick Gordon of Gordonstoun, and his great-grandson, who was created a baronet in 1804, took the name of Gordon-Cumming. (view tartan)
Cumming Hunting Weathered
The Cummings (or Comyns to use the ancient spelling) were of Norman descent and the progenitor of the clan was Richard Comyn who came to Scotland in the 12th century. His descendant, Sir John, Lord of Badenoch, was known as the quot;Red Coymnquot; and his son as the quot;Black Comynquot;. The quot;Black Comynquot; was one of the competitors for the crown of Scotland in 1296. Their opposition to King Robert the Bruce led to their extermination and the Cummings of Altyre became the chief branch. They took an active part in public affairs and engaged in clan warfare. In 1657 Robert of Altyre married a daughter of Sir Ludovick Gordon of Gordonstoun, and his great-grandson, who was created a baronet in 1804, took the name of Gordon-Cumming. (view tartan)
Cumming Red Modern
The Cummings (or Comyns to use the ancient spelling) were of Norman descent and the progenitor of the clan was Richard Comyn who came to Scotland in the 12th century. His descendant, Sir John, Lord of Badenoch, was known as the quot;Red Coymnquot; and his son as the quot;Black Comynquot;. The quot;Black Comynquot; was one of the competitors for the crown of Scotland in 1296. Their opposition to King Robert the Bruce led to their extermination and the Cummings of Altyre became the chief branch. They took an active part in public affairs and engaged in clan warfare. In 1657 Robert of Altyre married a daughter of Sir Ludovick Gordon of Gordonstoun, and his great-grandson, who was created a baronet in 1804, took the name of Gordon-Cumming. Badge - Cumin Plant (view tartan)
Cunningham Hunting Ancient
Ayrshire is the home of this family where they were settled in the 12th century. For bravery at the Battle of Largs in 1263 Hervey de Cunningham received the lands of Kilmaurs from the King. By marriage the family came into possession of other properties including Glencairn, and Alexander de Cunningham was created Earl of Glencairn in 1488. The 9th Earl who was Lord Justice General, raised an army in the Highlands in support of King Charles II in 1653. The 14th Earl was a friend of Scotlands National Bard, Robert Burns, who, when the Earl died, wrote the well-known ldquo;Lament for the Earl of Glencairn. Other important branches of this family were those of Corsehill, Craigends and Caprington. (view tartan)
Cunningham Hunting Weathered
Ayrshire is the home of this family where they were settled in the 12th century. For bravery at the Battle of Largs in 1263 Hervey de Cunningham received the lands of Kilmaurs from the King. By marriage the family came into possession of other properties including Glencairn, and Alexander de Cunningham was created Earl of Glencairn in 1488. The 9th Earl who was Lord Justice General, raised an army in the Highlands in support of King Charles II in 1653. The 14th Earl was a friend of Scotlands National Bard, Robert Burns, who, when the Earl died, wrote the well-known ldquo;Lament for the Earl of Glencairn. Other important branches of this family were those of Corsehill, Craigends and Caprington. (view tartan)
Cunningham Modern
Ayrshire is the home of this family where they were settled in the 12th century. For bravery at the Battle of Largs in 1263 Hervey de Cunningham received the lands of Kilmaurs from the King. By marriage the family came into possession of other properties including Glencairn, and Alexander de Cunningham was created Earl of Glencairn in 1488. The 9th Earl who was Lord Justice General, raised an army in the Highlands in support of King Charles II in 1653. The 14th Earl was a friend of Scotlands National Bard, Robert Burns, who, when the Earl died, wrote the well-known ldquo;Lament for the Earl of Glencairn. Other important branches of this family were those of Corsehill, Craigends and Caprington. (view tartan)
Dalziel Ancient
The Sheriff of Lanark, in 1288 was Hugh De Dalyhel and the Dalziels had other early connections in Lanarkshire. Sir Robert Dalziel, whose father fought for Mary, Queen of Scots, at the battle of Langside, was created Lord Daziel in 1633 and Earl of Carnwath in 1649. He ruined himself and his estates in the service of King Charles I. The Binns branch are descended from General Thomas Dalziel who served with the Czar of Russia and was nicknamed "The Muscovy Beast". He established the famous Scottish Regiment, the Scots Greys, and in 1666 was Commander in Chief in Scotland when he defeated the Covenanters at Rullion Green. (view tartan)
Dalziel Modern
The Sheriff of Lanark, in 1288 was Hugh De Dalyhel and the Dalziels had other early connections in Lanarkshire. Sir Robert Dalziel, whose father fought for Mary, Queen of Scots, at the battle of Langside, was created Lord Daziel in 1633 and Earl of Carnwath in 1649. He ruined himself and his estates in the service of King Charles I. The Binns branch are descended from General Thomas Dalziel who served with the Czar of Russia and was nicknamed quot;The Muscovy Beastquot;. He established the famous Scottish Regiment, the Scots Greys, and in 1666 was Commander in Chief in Scotland when he defeated the Covenanters at Rullion Green (view tartan)
Davidson Clan Ancient
This clan takes its name, Clan Dhai, from its first known chief, David Dhu. In earlier times the chief was described as quot;of Invernahavenquot;. In or about 1350 they joined in the Clan Chattan Confederation of Clans and were involved in a quarrel over precedency with the Clan Macpherson. Some historians claim that this quarrel led to the famous combat on the North Inch of Perth in 1396 when thirty members of each clan fought against each other in the presence of the King. All but one of the Davidsons were killed and from then onwards the clan was not prominent. The Davidsons of Tulloch and the Davidsons of Cantray were influential branches of the clan in the 18th century. The Tulloch branch is now regarded as the senior branch. (view tartan)
Davidson Clan Modern
This clan takes its name, Clan Dhai, from its first known chief, David Dhu. In earlier times the chief was described as quot;of Invernahavenquot;. In or about 1350 they joined in the Clan Chattan Confederation of Clans and were involved in a quarrel over precedency with the Clan Macpherson. Some historians claim that this quarrel led to the famous combat on the North Inch of Perth in 1396 when thirty members of each clan fought against each other in the presence of the King. All but one of the Davidsons were killed and from then onwards the clan was not prominent. The Davidsons of Tulloch and the Davidsons of Cantray were influential branches of the clan in the 18th century. The Tulloch branch is now regarded as the senior branch. (view tartan)
Davidson of Tulloch Ancient
This clan takes its name, Clan Dhai, from its first known chief, David Dhu. In earlier times the chief was described as quot;of Invernahavenquot;. In or about 1350 they joined in the Clan Chattan Confederation of Clans and were involved in a quarrel over precedency with the Clan Macpherson. Some historians claim that this quarrel led to the famous combat on the North Inch of Perth in 1396 when thirty members of each clan fought against each other in the presence of the King. All but one of the Davidsons were killed and from then onwards the clan was not prominent. The Davidsons of Tulloch and the Davidsons of Cantray were influential branches of the clan in the 18th century. The Tulloch branch is now regarded as the senior branch. (view tartan)
Davidson of Tulloch Modern
This clan takes its name, Clan Dhai, from its first known chief, David Dhu. In earlier times the chief was described as quot;of Invernahavenquot;. In or about 1350 they joined in the Clan Chattan Confederation of Clans and were involved in a quarrel over precedency with the Clan Macpherson. Some historians claim that this quarrel led to the famous combat on the North Inch of Perth in 1396 when thirty members of each clan fought against each other in the presence of the King. All but one of the Davidsons were killed and from then onwards the clan was not prominent. The Davidsons of Tulloch and the Davidsons of Cantray were influential branches of the clan in the 18th century. The Tulloch branch is now regarded as the senior branch. (view tartan)
Douglas Ancient
The Douglasses were one of the most powerful families in Scotland, and in the 12th century were firmly settled in Lanarkshire. They took a prominent part in the Scottish War of Independence, under Sir William Wallace and Robert the Bruce. Sir James Douglas, the ldquo;Good Sir James, who was the Bruces trusted Lieutenant, was killed in 1330 when carrying Bruces heart to the Holy Land for burial. The English soldiers, whom he terrorised called him ldquo;The Black Douglas. From the Douglasses have sprung many famous families. They frequently married into the Scottish Royal family and held many honours in high positions. (view tartan)
Douglas Grey
The Douglasses were one of the most powerful families in Scotland, and in the 12th century were firmly settled in Lanarkshire. They took a prominent part in the Scottish War of Independence, under Sir William Wallace and Robert the Bruce. Sir James Douglas, the ldquo;Good Sir James, who was the Bruces trusted Lieutenant, was killed in 1330 when carrying Bruces heart to the Holy Land for burial. The English soldiers, whom he terrorised called him ldquo;The Black Douglas. From the Douglasses have sprung many famous families. They frequently married into the Scottish Royal family and held many honours in high positions. (view tartan)
Douglas Modern
The Douglasses were one of the most powerful families in Scotland, and in the 12th century were firmly settled in Lanarkshire. They took a prominent part in the Scottish War of Independence, under Sir William Wallace and Robert the Bruce. Sir James Douglas, the ldquo;Good Sir James, who was the Bruces trusted Lieutenant, was killed in 1330 when carrying Bruces heart to the Holy Land for burial. The English soldiers, whom he terrorised called him ldquo;The Black Douglas. From the Douglasses have sprung many famous families. They frequently married into the Scottish Royal family and held many honours in high positions. (view tartan)
Douglas Weathered
The Douglasses were one of the most powerful families in Scotland, and in the 12th century were firmly settled in Lanarkshire. They took a prominent part in the Scottish War of Independence, under Sir William Wallace and Robert the Bruce. Sir James Douglas, the ldquo;Good Sir James, who was the Bruces trusted Lieutenant, was killed in 1330 when carrying Bruces heart to the Holy Land for burial. The English soldiers, whom he terrorised called him ldquo;The Black Douglas. From the Douglasses have sprung many famous families. They frequently married into the Scottish Royal family and held many honours in high positions. (view tartan)
Drummond Clan Ancient
The Drummonds take their name from the lands of Drymen (or Drummond), in Stirlingshire, which they possessed prior to the 12th century. Sir Malcolm de Drymen, who supported Robert the Bruce, was instrumental in winning the Battle of Bannockburn by strewing caltrops (or spikes) on the ground thus disabling large numbers of the English cavalry. The 4th Lord Drummond became Earl of Perth in 1605. The Drummonds were intensely Jacobite in sympathy and King James VII conferred upon the Earl the Dukedom of Perth. The 3rd Duke was wounded at the Battle of Culloden while fighting in the Jacobite army. He later escaped to France. The Dukedom of Atholl was conferred on the 2nd Marquis. The dukedom became extinct on the death of the 6th Duke. (view tartan)
Drummond of Perth Modern
The Drummonds take their name from the lands of Drymen (or Drummond), in Stirlingshire, which they possessed prior to the 12th century. Sir Malcolm de Drymen, who supported Robert the Bruce, was instrumental in winning the Battle of Bannockburn by strewing caltrops (or spikes) on the ground thus disabling large numbers of the English cavalry. The 4th Lord Drummond became Earl of Perth in 1605. The Drummonds were intensely Jacobite in sympathy and King James VII conferred upon the Earl the Dukedom of Perth. The 3rd Duke was wounded at the Battle of Culloden while fighting in the Jacobite army. He later escaped to France. The Dukedom of Atholl was conferred on the 2nd Marquis. The dukedom became extinct on the death of the 6th Duke. (view tartan)
Drummond of Perth Weathered
The Drummonds take their name from the lands of Drymen (or Drummond), in Stirlingshire, which they possessed prior to the 12th century. Sir Malcolm de Drymen, who supported Robert the Bruce, was instrumental in winning the Battle of Bannockburn by strewing caltrops (or spikes) on the ground thus disabling large numbers of the English cavalry. The 4th Lord Drummond became Earl of Perth in 1605. The Drummonds were intensely Jacobite in sympathy and King James VII conferred upon the Earl the Dukedom of Perth. The 3rd Duke was wounded at the Battle of Culloden while fighting in the Jacobite army. He later escaped to France. The Dukedom of Atholl was conferred on the 2nd Marquis. The dukedom became extinct on the death of the 6th Duke. (view tartan)
Dunbar Ancient
In 1702 King Malcolm III gave the lands of Dunbar to one Gospatric who was a kinsman of King Duncan. Gospatric became Earl of Dunbar and his descendant, the 8th Earl who was also Earl of March, was a competitor for the Crown of Scotland in 1296. Patrick, his son, supported the English, and after the Battle of Bannockburn in 1314 he helped King Edward II of England to escape from Scotland. The 11th Earl was faithful to King James I, but his power was so great that the King feared he might become a danger to the throne. His Earldoms were forfeited in 1435. (view tartan)
Dunbar Modern
In 1702 King Malcolm III gave the lands of Dunbar to one Gospatric who was a kinsman of King Duncan. Gospatric became Earl of Dunbar and his descendant, the 8th Earl who was also Earl of March, was a competitor for the Crown of Scotland in 1296. Patrick, his son, supported the English, and after the Battle of Bannockburn in 1314 he helped King Edward II of England to escape from Scotland. The 11th Earl was faithful to King James I, but his power was so great that the King feared he might become a danger to the throne. His Earldoms were forfeited in 1435. (view tartan)
Duncan Ancient
The Duncans come from the same stock as the Clan Robertson who, called Clan Donnachaidh, are descended from quot;fat Duncanquot; or Donnachaidh Reamhar, who lived in the 13th century. This ancestor led his men in support of Robert the Bruce at the Battle of Bannockburn in 1314. The Duncans possessed lands in Fifeshire including Gourdie and Lundie. Sir William Dunbar, who was physician to King George III, was created a Baronet in 1764. Alexander Duncan of Lundie, Provost of Dundee, supported the Jacobites in 1745. His son, Adam, became famous as an Admiral. He defeated the Spanish at Cape St Vincent in 1780, and his most notable victory was gained at Camperdown in 1797. In 1831 he was created Earl of Camperdown. (view tartan)
Duncan Modern
The Duncans come from the same stock as the Clan Robertson who, called Clan Donnachaidh, are descended from quot;fat Duncanquot; or Donnachaidh Reamhar, who lived in the 13th century. This ancestor led his men in support of Robert the Bruce at the Battle of Bannockburn in 1314. The Duncans possessed lands in Fifeshire including Gourdie and Lundie. Sir William Dunbar, who was physician to King George III, was created a Baronet in 1764. Alexander Duncan of Lundie, Provost of Dundee, supported the Jacobites in 1745. His son, Adam, became famous as an Admiral. He defeated the Spanish at Cape St Vincent in 1780, and his most notable victory was gained at Camperdown in 1797. In 1831 he was created Earl of Camperdown. (view tartan)
Dundas Ancient
Ancient Dundas Heavy Weight Tartan.This is one of our oldest Scottish families and takes its name from the lands of Dundas in West Lothian where they were settled probably in the early 12th century. Sir Hugh Dundas supported Sir William Wallace during the Patriot's campaign against the English. His son, Sir George, aided Robert the Bruce. The island of Inchgarvie was given to the 13th chief by King James IV. The Dundasses of Fingask descended from a half brother of the 12th laird and from them sprung the family of Kerse. Dundas of Arnistonn was a Lord of Session in 1662. This family achieved legal eminence and several of them were judges. (view tartan)
Dundee Old Ancient
Recently there appeared in the Dundee Museum a pattern of Tartan simply labelled DUNDEE with a note on its origin. Produced from a formula contained in the Wilson Pattern Book. Wilson of Bannockburn were Tartan Manufacturers in the 18th century. One of these pattern books was in the possession of Mr John Cargill of Dundee who designed and wove the sample for the museum. The design is very similar to Bonnie Prince Charlie's Jacket in the United Services Museum in Edinburgh Castle. The Tartan has lain dormant, in fact unknown for 160 years. It has now been resurrected by the Ben Nevis Handloom Weavers of Dundee. (view tartan)
Dunlop Ancient
the worlds leading manufacturer of Tartan (view tartan)
Edinburgh
The Edinburgh tartan was designed and registered by the late Hugh Macpherson of Edinburgh in 1970 to mark the Commonwealth Games being held there that year. In more recent times this pattern has provided inspiration for two quite separate patterns named quot;Dunedinquot; ndash; in Florida, USA, and New Zealand. quot;Dunedinquot; is an alternative (or lyrical) form of Edinburgh used by towns in these countries. Present day usage defines this as a quot;districtquot; pattern suitable for use by persons having links with the place, or as a memento of their visit. (view tartan)
Elliot Ancient
The Elliots were an important Border family with many branches. The Elliots of Stobs originated in the 16th century. In 1666 George Elliot of Stobs was made a Baronet of Nova Scotia. The youngest son of the 3rd Baronet was General George Elliot, who had a distinguished military career. He was Governor of Gibraltar in 1782 when Spain and France attacked and besieged that fortress. His magnificent defence of quot;the Rockquot; against tremendous odds was one of the finest military feats of the time. In 1787 he was created Lord Heathfield, Baron Gibraltar. George Elliot, who descended from the Stobs family, founded the Minto family and was a Lord of Session. His great grandson, Gilbert, was Governor General of India, 1807ndash;12, and was created Earl of Minto. (view tartan)
Elliot Modern
The Elliots were an important Border family with many branches. The Elliots of Stobs originated in the 16th century. In 1666 George Elliot of Stobs was made a Baronet of Nova Scotia. The youngest son of the 3rd Baronet was General George Elliot, who had a distinguished military career. He was Governor of Gibraltar in 1782 when Spain and France attacked and besieged that fortress. His magnificent defence of quot;the Rockquot; against tremendous odds was one of the finest military feats of the time. In 1787 he was created Lord Heathfield, Baron Gibraltar. George Elliot, who descended from the Stobs family, founded the Minto family and was a Lord of Session. His great grandson, Gilbert, was Governor General of India, 1807ndash;12, and was created Earl of Minto. (view tartan)
Erskine Modern
Modern Erskine Heavy Weight TartanThis family descended from Henry de Erskine, who owned the barony of Erskine, in Renfrewshire, in the 13th century. During the War of Independence they supported King Robert the Bruce. In 1435 Sir Robert Erskine assumed the title of Earl of Mar and his son, who was deprived of the Earldom in 1457, was created Lord Erskine in 1467. Alexander, son of the 4th Lord, was ancestor of the Earls of Kellie. The Earldom of Mar was restored in 1565, and the 6th Earl is notable for the part he played in the Jacobite Rising of 1715. There are several important branches of this family. (view tartan)
Farquharson Ancient
Ancient Farquharson Heavy WeightTartan. This Aberdeenshire clan is descended from Farquhar, son of Shaw of Rothiemurchus, and was a member of the great Clan Chattan Confederation of Clans. The Farquharsons had a long record of service to their country and participated in many historic battles, including Pinkie in 1547, when Finlay Mor of Invercauld was killed. During the two Jacobite Risings they supported, and fought for, the House of Stewart, and during the Rising of 1745, 300 of the clan served in Prince Charlies army. Ann Farquharson, wife of the Mackintosh of Mackintosh, was an ardent Jacobite and in 1746 helped to save Prince Charlies life by her strategy in planning the ldquo;Rout of Moy. (view tartan)
Farquharson Modern
This Aberdeenshire clan is descended from Farquhar, son of Shaw of Rothiemurchus, and was a member of the great Clan Chattan Confederation of Clans. The Farquharsons had a long record of service to their country and participated in many historic battles, including Pinkie in 1547, when Finlay Mor of Invercauld was killed. During the two Jacobite Risings they supported, and fought for, the House of Stewart, and during the Rising of 1745, 300 of the clan served in Prince Charlies army. Ann Farquharson, wife of the Mackintosh of Mackintosh, was an ardent Jacobite and in 1746 helped to save Prince Charlies life by her strategy in planning the ldquo;Rout of Moy. (view tartan)
Farquharson Weathered
This Aberdeenshire clan is descended from Farquhar, son of Shaw of Rothiemurchus, and was a member of the great Clan Chattan Confederation of Clans. The Farquharsons had a long record of service to their country and participated in many historic battles, including Pinkie in 1547, when Finlay Mor of Invercauld was killed. During the two Jacobite Risings they supported, and fought for, the House of Stewart, and during the Rising of 1745, 300 of the clan served in Prince Charlies army. Ann Farquharson, wife of the Mackintosh of Mackintosh, was an ardent Jacobite and in 1746 helped to save Prince Charlies life by her strategy in planning the ldquo;Rout of Moy. (view tartan)
Ferguson Ancient
Argyllshire is the home of this clan. The Fergusons of Strachur claim to be descended from the Royal House of Dalraida. The Fergusons of Kilkerran descend from Fergus, who held his possessions by a charter granted to him by King Robert I. Sir John Ferguson of Kilkerran was, in 1708, created a baronet. The Fergusons of Atholl had charters for their lands from Balliol and King Robert the Bruce. During the 1745 Jacobite Rising the Atholl Fergusons supported Prince Charlie. There are some prominent branches of the Clan Ferguson in Aberdeenshire, Banffshire, Kincardineshire, Dumfries and Galloway. (view tartan)
Ferguson Modern
Argyllshire is the home of this clan. The Fergusons of Strachur claim to be descended from the Royal House of Dalraida. The Fergusons of Kilkerran descend from Fergus, who held his possessions by a charter granted to him by King Robert I. Sir John Ferguson of Kilkerran was, in 1708, created a baronet. The Fergusons of Atholl had charters for their lands from Balliol and King Robert the Bruce. During the 1745 Jacobite Rising the Atholl Fergusons supported Prince Charlie. There are some prominent branches of the Clan Ferguson in Aberdeenshire, Banffshire, Kincardineshire, Dumfries and Galloway. (view tartan)
Ferguson Weathered
Weathered Ferguson Heavy Weight TartanArgyllshire is the home of this clan. The Fergusons of Strachur claim to be descended from the Royal House of Dalraida. The Fergusons of Kilkerran descend from Fergus, who held his possessions by a charter granted to him by King Robert I. Sir John Ferguson of Kilkerran was, in 1708, created a baronet. The Fergusons of Atholl had charters for their lands from Balliol and King Robert the Bruce. During the 1745 Jacobite Rising the Atholl Fergusons supported Prince Charlie. There are some prominent branches of the Clan Ferguson in Aberdeenshire, Banffshire, Kincardineshire, Dumfries and Galloway. (view tartan)
Fletcher of Dunans Ancient
A fletcher was an arrowsmith or bowmaker. Since, therefore, the name of Fletcher is taken from a trade, many families of this name sprang up to follow the different clans among which they made their living. The name is found among the men of Kilravock as early as 1497, while the Fletchers of Glenlyon were arrowmakers to the MacGregors. The Fletchers were out for the Prince in 1745. In the 18th century, the best-known of the name was Gillesp na Crannaich, Archibald of Dunans, a friend of Rob Roy with whom he had many adventures. Several Fletchers of Dunans (the leading family), descendants of Gillesp, greatly distinguished themselves in law, government and reform. Badge Ð Pine. (view tartan)
Forbes Ancient
For over 800 years the house of Forbes has been settled in Aberdeenshire. During the Scottish War of Independence Alexander Forbes died defending Urquhart Castle against King Edward I of England. There are some very important branches of the clan, probably the most famous being that of Culloden which dates from the 15th century. Duncan Forbes of Culloden, an eminent lawyer and statesman, became Lord President of the Session and spent his life in the service of the Government. During the 1745 Rising he exerted his influence upon the Highland Clans and prevented or persuaded, many of them to forsake the Jacobite cause. In his native Inverness he was dubbed ldquo;King Duncan because of the tremendous power he possessed. Castle Forbes, Aberdeenshire, is the seat of the Baron Forbes. (view tartan)
Forbes Dress Modern
For over 800 years the house of Forbes has been settled in Aberdeenshire. During the Scottish War of Independence Alexander Forbes died defending Urquhart Castle against King Edward I of England. There are some very important branches of the clan, probably the most famous being that of Culloden which dates from the 15th century. Duncan Forbes of Culloden, an eminent lawyer and statesman, became Lord President of the Session and spent his life in the service of the Government. During the 1745 Rising he exerted his influence upon the Highland Clans and prevented or persuaded, many of them to forsake the Jacobite cause. In his native Inverness he was dubbed ldquo;King Duncan because of the tremendous power he possessed. Castle Forbes, Aberdeenshire, is the seat of the Baron Forbes. (view tartan)
Forbes Modern
For over 800 years the house of Forbes has been settled in Aberdeenshire. During the Scottish War of Independence Alexander Forbes died defending Urquhart Castle against King Edward I of England. There are some very important branches of the clan, probably the most famous being that of Culloden which dates from the 15th century. Duncan Forbes of Culloden, an eminent lawyer and statesman, became Lord President of the Session and spent his life in the service of the Government. During the 1745 Rising he exerted his influence upon the Highland Clans and prevented or persuaded, many of them to forsake the Jacobite cause. In his native Inverness he was dubbed ldquo;King Duncan because of the tremendous power he possessed. Castle Forbes, Aberdeenshire, is the seat of the Baron Forbes. (view tartan)
Forbes Weathered
For over 800 years the house of Forbes has been settled in Aberdeenshire. During the Scottish War of Independence Alexander Forbes died defending Urquhart Castle against King Edward I of England. There are some very important branches of the clan, probably the most famous being that of Culloden which dates from the 15th century. Duncan Forbes of Culloden, an eminent lawyer and statesman, became Lord President of the Session and spent his life in the service of the Government. During the 1745 Rising he exerted his influence upon the Highland Clans and prevented or persuaded, many of them to forsake the Jacobite cause. In his native Inverness he was dubbed "King Duncan" because of the tremendous power he possessed. Castle Forbes, Aberdeenshire, is the seat of the Baron Forbes. Badge - Broom. (view tartan)
Forsyth Ancient
The origin of this name is doubtful, but it may be derived from the Gaelic Fearsithe, meaning ldquo;Man of peace. A Forsyth (to use the modern spelling) was given land at Sauchie, Stirlingshire, by King Robert I, about 1306, and in 1368 a Forsyth was Constable of Stirling Castle. This surname was not confined to the Stirling district and at an early date is found in widely separated places such as Edinburgh, Dumbarton and Inverness. In 1368 William de Fersith was a Baillie in Edinburgh. (view tartan)
Forsyth Modern
Modern Forsyth Heavy Weight Tartan.The origin of this name is doubtful, but it may be derived from the Gaelic Fearsithe, meaning ldquo;Man of peace. A Forsyth (to use the modern spelling) was given land at Sauchie, Stirlingshire, by King Robert I, about 1306, and in 1368 a Forsyth was Constable of Stirling Castle. This surname was not confined to the Stirling district and at an early date is found in widely separated places such as Edinburgh, Dumbarton and Inverness. In 1368 William de Fersith was a Baillie in Edinburgh. (view tartan)
Fraser Clan Ancient
Of Norman origin, this clan settled on the Borders about 1160 and later came northwards to settle in the Highlands. One of the most notable branches of the clan is the Frasers of Lovat, whose home is in Inverness-shire. The Frasers of Lovat played an active part in Highland history and were frequently engaged in clan feuds. Simon, Lord Lovat, who was beheaded for his Jacobite activities during the 1745 Jacobite Rising, is one of the enigmas of history. His son, General Fraser, fought at Quebec and had a distinguished military career. Lord Saltoun, whose seat is at Cairnbuig, Aberdeenshire, is chief of the whole Clan Fraser, while Lord Lovat is Chief of the Clan Fraser of Lovat. Badge - Yew. (view tartan)
Fraser Clan Modern
Of Norman origin, this clan settled on the Borders about 1160 and later came northwards to settle in the Highlands. One of the most notable branches of the clan is the Frasers of Lovat, whose home is in Inverness-shire. The Frasers of Lovat played an active part in Highland history and were frequently engaged in clan feuds. Simon, Lord Lovat, who was beheaded for his Jacobite activities during the 1745 Jacobite Rising, is one of the enigmas of history. His son, General Fraser, fought at Quebec and had a distinguished military career. Lord Saltoun, whose seat is at Cairnbuig, Aberdeenshire, is chief of the whole Clan Fraser, while Lord Lovat is Chief of the Clan Fraser of Lovat. Badge - Yew. (view tartan)
Fraser Clan Weathered
Of Norman origin, this clan settled on the Borders about 1160 and later came northwards to settle in the Highlands. One of the most notable branches of the clan is the Frasers of Lovat, whose home is in Inverness-shire. The Frasers of Lovat played an active part in Highland history and were frequently engaged in clan feuds. Simon, Lord Lovat, who was beheaded for his Jacobite activities during the 1745 Jacobite Rising, is one of the enigmas of history. His son, General Fraser, fought at Quebec and had a distinguished military career. Lord Saltoun, whose seat is at Cairnbuig, Aberdeenshire, is chief of the whole Clan Fraser, while Lord Lovat is Chief of the Clan Fraser of Lovat. Badge - Yew. (view tartan)
Fraser Hunting Ancient
Of Norman origin, this clan settled on the Borders about 1160 and later came northwards to settle in the Highlands. One of the most notable branches of the clan is the Frasers of Lovat, whose home is in Inverness-shire. The Frasers of Lovat played an active part in Highland history and were frequently engaged in clan feuds. Simon, Lord Lovat, who was beheaded for his Jacobite activities during the 1745 Jacobite Rising, is one of the enigmas of history. His son, General Fraser, fought at Quebec and had a distinguished military career. Lord Saltoun, whose seat is at Cairnbuig, Aberdeenshire, is chief of the whole Clan Fraser, while Lord Lovat is Chief of the Clan Fraser of Lovat. (view tartan)
Fraser Hunting Modern
Of Norman origin, this clan settled on the Borders about 1160 and later came northwards to settle in the Highlands. One of the most notable branches of the clan is the Frasers of Lovat, whose home is in Inverness-shire. The Frasers of Lovat played an active part in Highland history and were frequently engaged in clan feuds. Simon, Lord Lovat, who was beheaded for his Jacobite activities during the 1745 Jacobite Rising, is one of the enigmas of history. His son, General Fraser, fought at Quebec and had a distinguished military career. Lord Saltoun, whose seat is at Cairnbuig, Aberdeenshire, is chief of the whole Clan Fraser, while Lord Lovat is Chief of the Clan Fraser of Lovat. (view tartan)
Fraser Hunting Weathered
Of Norman origin, this clan settled on the Borders about 1160 and later came northwards to settle in the Highlands. One of the most notable branches of the clan is the Frasers of Lovat, whose home is in Inverness-shire. The Frasers of Lovat played an active part in Highland history and were frequently engaged in clan feuds. Simon, Lord Lovat, who was beheaded for his Jacobite activities during the 1745 Jacobite Rising, is one of the enigmas of history. His son, General Fraser, fought at Quebec and had a distinguished military career. Lord Saltoun, whose seat is at Cairnbuig, Aberdeenshire, is chief of the whole Clan Fraser, while Lord Lovat is Chief of the Clan Fraser of Lovat. (view tartan)
Fraser Of Lovat Modern
Of Norman origin, this clan settled on the Borders about 1160 and later came northwards to settle in the Highlands. One of the most notable branches of the clan is the Frasers of Lovat, whose home is in Inverness-shire. The Frasers of Lovat played an active part in Highland history and were frequently engaged in clan feuds. Simon, Lord Lovat, who was beheaded for his Jacobite activities during the 1745 Jacobite Rising, is one of the enigmas of history. His son, General Fraser, fought at Quebec and had a distinguished military career. Lord Saltoun, whose seat is at Cairnbuig, Aberdeenshire, is chief of the whole Clan Fraser, while Lord Lovat is Chief of the Clan Fraser of Lovat. (view tartan)
Fraser Red Ancient
Of Norman origin, this clan settled on the Borders about 1160 and later came northwards to settle in the Highlands. One of the most notable branches of the clan is the Frasers of Lovat, whose home is in Inverness-shire. The Frasers of Lovat played an active part in Highland history and were frequently engaged in clan feuds. Simon, Lord Lovat, who was beheaded for his Jacobite activities during the 1745 Jacobite Rising, is one of the enigmas of history. His son, General Fraser, fought at Quebec and had a distinguished military career. Lord Saltoun, whose seat is at Cairnbuig, Aberdeenshire, is chief of the whole Clan Fraser, while Lord Lovat is Chief of the Clan Fraser of Lovat. Badge - Yew. (view tartan)
Fraser Red Modern
Of Norman origin, this clan settled on the Borders about 1160 and later came northwards to settle in the Highlands. One of the most notable branches of the clan is the Frasers of Lovat, whose home is in Inverness-shire. The Frasers of Lovat played an active part in Highland history and were frequently engaged in clan feuds. Simon, Lord Lovat, who was beheaded for his Jacobite activities during the 1745 Jacobite Rising, is one of the enigmas of history. His son, General Fraser, fought at Quebec and had a distinguished military career. Lord Saltoun, whose seat is at Cairnbuig, Aberdeenshire, is chief of the whole Clan Fraser, while Lord Lovat is Chief of the Clan Fraser of Lovat. Badge - Yew. (view tartan)
Fraser Red Weathered
Of Norman origin, this clan settled on the Borders about 1160 and later came northwards to settle in the Highlands. One of the most notable branches of the clan is the Frasers of Lovat, whose home is in Inverness-shire. The Frasers of Lovat played an active part in Highland history and were frequently engaged in clan feuds. Simon, Lord Lovat, who was beheaded for his Jacobite activities during the 1745 Jacobite Rising, is one of the enigmas of history. His son, General Fraser, fought at Quebec and had a distinguished military career. Lord Saltoun, whose seat is at Cairnbuig, Aberdeenshire, is chief of the whole Clan Fraser, while Lord Lovat is Chief of the Clan Fraser of Lovat. Badge - Yew. (view tartan)
Gala Water Ancient
(view tartan)
Galbraith Ancient
The meaning of this name is accepted as being quot;the Briton's sonquot;, and it is believed that the original Galbraith may have been one of the Britons who settled among the Gaels. People of the name were in the Lennox district in the 13th century. In later times we find them in Edinburgh and other parts of Scotland. Robert Galbraith, who was rector of Spot in 1584, was a Lord of Session in 1587. In the Gaelic Highlands of Scotland the name was rendered as Mac a' Bhreatnaich. The various ways of spelling Galbraith included Cabreth, Calbreth, Galbreath, Galbrathe and Galbrayth. (view tartan)
Galbraith Modern
The meaning of this name is accepted as being quot;the Briton's sonquot;, and it is believed that the original Galbraith may have been one of the Britons who settled among the Gaels. People of the name were in the Lennox district in the 13th century. In later times we find them in Edinburgh and other parts of Scotland. Robert Galbraith, who was rector of Spot in 1584, was a Lord of Session in 1587. In the Gaelic Highlands of Scotland the name was rendered as Mac a' Bhreatnaich. The various ways of spelling Galbraith included Cabreth, Calbreth, Galbreath, Galbrathe and Galbrayth. (view tartan)
Galloway Red Modern
The Galloway tartans ndash; there is a red and green ndash; mark a new trend in the ever-growing story of The Tartan. Designed by Councillor John Hannay during the 1930s, they were intended for the use of persons, who, having no clan tartan of their own, yet wished to show their attachment to some particular section of the people of Scotland: in this case, the folk of Galloway. Anyone who has any connection, either by blood or interests, with Galloway is entitled to wear either of these setts. They are sometimes found with the light narrow stripe woven in white, but the original had pale primrose. (view tartan)
Gillies Ancient
This name comes from the Gaelic Gillelosa, the Servant of Jesus. It was common at one time in Badenoch, where the Macphersons of Invereshie were known as the Sliochd Gillies, descended from one Gillies Macpherson, who lived in the reign of Alexander III. A Gillies witnessed a charter by David I to the Abbey of Holyrood in 1128, and another, Ograve;M. filius GiliseOacute;, a confirmation of a charter of Malcolm IV to the Abbey of Scone in 1164. This surname is common also in the Outer Isles. Owing to its derivation it has been much in use as a Christian name in the Highlands, when it is usually Englished as Elias. The spelling in the rest of Scotland varies between Gillies and Gilles. (view tartan)
Gillies Dress Ancient
This name comes from the Gaelic Gillelosa, the Servant of Jesus. It was common at one time in Badenoch, where the Macphersons of Invereshie were known as the Sliochd Gillies, descended from one Gillies Macpherson, who lived in the reign of Alexander III. A Gillies witnessed a charter by David I to the Abbey of Holyrood in 1128, and another, Ograve;M. filius GiliseOacute;, a confirmation of a charter of Malcolm IV to the Abbey of Scone in 1164. This surname is common also in the Outer Isles. Owing to its derivation it has been much in use as a Christian name in the Highlands, when it is usually Englished as Elias. The spelling in the rest of Scotland varies between Gillies and Gilles. (view tartan)
Gordon Blue
First recorded in Berwickshire in the 12th century, the Clan Gordon have, since the 14th century, been associated with Aberdeenshire. Sir Adam (Lord of Gordon) was given the Lordship of Strathbogie by King Robert the Bruce for services in battle. As a clan they were powerful and waged war against neighbouring clans, and their chief was called ldquo;The Cock of the North. The Marquis of Huntly was Governor of Inverness Castle and his deputy, in 1562, refused Mary, Queen of Scots entry to that fortress. The Gordon Highlanders were raised in 1794 and Jane, Duchess of Gordon, who helped to obtain recruits, is traditionally said to have kissed each man as he enlisted. Aboyne Castle, in Aberdeenshire, is the home of the chief. (view tartan)
Gordon Clan Ancient
First recorded in Berwickshire in the 12th century, the Clan Gordon have, since the 14th century, been associated with Aberdeenshire. Sir Adam (Lord of Gordon) was given the Lordship of Strathbogie by King Robert the Bruce for services in battle. As a clan they were powerful and waged war against neighbouring clans, and their chief was called ldquo;The Cock of the North. The Marquis of Huntly was Governor of Inverness Castle and his deputy, in 1562, refused Mary, Queen of Scots entry to that fortress. The Gordon Highlanders were raised in 1794 and Jane, Duchess of Gordon, who helped to obtain recruits, is traditionally said to have kissed each man as he enlisted. Aboyne Castle, in Aberdeenshire, is the home of the chief (view tartan)
Gordon Clan Modern
First recorded in Berwickshire in the 12th century, the Clan Gordon have, since the 14th century, been associated with Aberdeenshire. Sir Adam (Lord of Gordon) was given the Lordship of Strathbogie by King Robert the Bruce for services in battle. As a clan they were powerful and waged war against neighbouring clans, and their chief was called ldquo;The Cock of the North. The Marquis of Huntly was Governor of Inverness Castle and his deputy, in 1562, refused Mary, Queen of Scots entry to that fortress. The Gordon Highlanders were raised in 1794 and Jane, Duchess of Gordon, who helped to obtain recruits, is traditionally said to have kissed each man as he enlisted. Aboyne Castle, in Aberdeenshire, is the home of the chief (view tartan)
Gordon Clan Weathered
First recorded in Berwickshire in the 12th century, the Clan Gordon have, since the 14th century, been associated with Aberdeenshire. Sir Adam (Lord of Gordon) was given the Lordship of Strathbogie by King Robert the Bruce for services in battle. As a clan they were powerful and waged war against neighbouring clans, and their chief was called ldquo;The Cock of the North. The Marquis of Huntly was Governor of Inverness Castle and his deputy, in 1562, refused Mary, Queen of Scots entry to that fortress. The Gordon Highlanders were raised in 1794 and Jane, Duchess of Gordon, who helped to obtain recruits, is traditionally said to have kissed each man as he enlisted. Aboyne Castle, in Aberdeenshire, is the home of the chief. (view tartan)
Gordon Dress Ancient
First recorded in Berwickshire in the 12th century, the Clan Gordon have, since the 14th century, been associated with Aberdeenshire. Sir Adam (Lord of Gordon) was given the Lordship of Strathbogie by King Robert the Bruce for services in battle. As a clan they were powerful and waged war against neighbouring clans, and their chief was called ldquo;The Cock of the North. The Marquis of Huntly was Governor of Inverness Castle and his deputy, in 1562, refused Mary, Queen of Scots entry to that fortress. The Gordon Highlanders were raised in 1794 and Jane, Duchess of Gordon, who helped to obtain recruits, is traditionally said to have kissed each man as he enlisted. Aboyne Castle, in Aberdeenshire, is the home of the chief. (view tartan)
Gordon Dress Modern
First recorded in Berwickshire in the 12th century, the Clan Gordon have, since the 14th century, been associated with Aberdeenshire. Sir Adam (Lord of Gordon) was given the Lordship of Strathbogie by King Robert the Bruce for services in battle. As a clan they were powerful and waged war against neighbouring clans, and their chief was called ldquo;The Cock of the North. The Marquis of Huntly was Governor of Inverness Castle and his deputy, in 1562, refused Mary, Queen of Scots entry to that fortress. The Gordon Highlanders were raised in 1794 and Jane, Duchess of Gordon, who helped to obtain recruits, is traditionally said to have kissed each man as he enlisted. Aboyne Castle, in Aberdeenshire, is the home of the chief. (view tartan)
Gordon Old Ancient
First recorded in Berwickshire in the 12th century, the Clan Gordon have, since the 14th century, been associated with Aberdeenshire. Sir Adam (Lord of Gordon) was given the Lordship of Strathbogie by King Robert the Bruce for services in battle. As a clan they were powerful and waged war against neighbouring clans, and their chief was called ldquo;The Cock of the North. The Marquis of Huntly was Governor of Inverness Castle and his deputy, in 1562, refused Mary, Queen of Scots entry to that fortress. The Gordon Highlanders were raised in 1794 and Jane, Duchess of Gordon, who helped to obtain recruits, is traditionally said to have kissed each man as he enlisted. Aboyne Castle, in Aberdeenshire, is the home of the chief. (view tartan)
Gordon Red Ancient
First recorded in Berwickshire in the 12th century, the Clan Gordon have, since the 14th century, been associated with Aberdeenshire. Sir Adam (Lord of Gordon) was given the Lordship of Strathbogie by King Robert the Bruce for services in battle. As a clan they were powerful and waged war against neighbouring clans, and their chief was called ldquo;The Cock of the North. The Marquis of Huntly was Governor of Inverness Castle and his deputy, in 1562, refused Mary, Queen of Scots entry to that fortress. The Gordon Highlanders were raised in 1794 and Jane, Duchess of Gordon, who helped to obtain recruits, is traditionally said to have kissed each man as he enlisted. Aboyne Castle, in Aberdeenshire, is the home of the chief. (view tartan)
Gordon Red Weathered
First recorded in Berwickshire in the 12th century, the Clan Gordon have, since the 14th century, been associated with Aberdeenshire. Sir Adam (Lord of Gordon) was given the Lordship of Strathbogie by King Robert the Bruce for services in battle. As a clan they were powerful and waged war against neighbouring clans, and their chief was called ldquo;The Cock of the North. The Marquis of Huntly was Governor of Inverness Castle and his deputy, in 1562, refused Mary, Queen of Scots entry to that fortress. The Gordon Highlanders were raised in 1794 and Jane, Duchess of Gordon, who helped to obtain recruits, is traditionally said to have kissed each man as he enlisted. Aboyne Castle, in Aberdeenshire, is the home of the chief. (view tartan)
Gow Ancient
This name is of Gaelic origin and comes from gobha, meaning a ldquo;smith. It also takes the form of Magobhann (MacGowan), purely an occupational surname, the work of the smith being common in all clans. People of the name are now claimed as septs of Clan Macpherson and to have had connection with Badenoch and the Clan Chattan countryside. At the battle of the North Inch of Perth in 1396, Hal o the Wynd, a Perth smith, took the place of one of the combatants who was ill. After the battle he went north and settled near the Clan Chattan lands. (view tartan)
Gow Hunting Ancient
This name is of Gaelic origin and comes from gobha, meaning a ldquo;smith. It also takes the form of Magobhann (MacGowan), purely an occupational surname, the work of the smith being common in all clans. People of the name are now claimed as septs of Clan Macpherson and to have had connection with Badenoch and the Clan Chattan countryside. At the battle of the North Inch of Perth in 1396, Hal o the Wynd, a Perth smith, took the place of one of the combatants who was ill. After the battle he went north and settled near the Clan Chattan lands. (view tartan)
Gow Hunting Modern
This name is of Gaelic origin and comes from gobha, meaning a ldquo;smith. It also takes the form of Magobhann (MacGowan), purely an occupational surname, the work of the smith being common in all clans. People of the name are now claimed as septs of Clan Macpherson and to have had connection with Badenoch and the Clan Chattan countryside. At the battle of the North Inch of Perth in 1396, Hal o the Wynd, a Perth smith, took the place of one of the combatants who was ill. After the battle he went north and settled near the Clan Chattan lands. (view tartan)
Gow Hunting Weathered
This name is of Gaelic origin and comes from gobha, meaning a ldquo;smith. It also takes the form of Magobhann (MacGowan), purely an occupational surname, the work of the smith being common in all clans. People of the name are now claimed as septs of Clan Macpherson and to have had connection with Badenoch and the Clan Chattan countryside. At the battle of the North Inch of Perth in 1396, Hal o the Wynd, a Perth smith, took the place of one of the combatants who was ill. After the battle he went north and settled near the Clan Chattan lands. (view tartan)
Gow Modern
This name is of Gaelic origin and comes from gobha, meaning a ldquo;smith. It also takes the form of Magobhann (MacGowan), purely an occupational surname, the work of the smith being common in all clans. People of the name are now claimed as septs of Clan Macpherson and to have had connection with Badenoch and the Clan Chattan countryside. At the battle of the North Inch of Perth in 1396, Hal o the Wynd, a Perth smith, took the place of one of the combatants who was ill. After the battle he went north and settled near the Clan Chattan lands. (view tartan)
Graham Menteith Ancient
The Grahams of Montrose trace their origin to a date before the 12th century. Known as the ldquo;Gallant Grahams, they were chivalrous knights and fought in many of Scotlands battles, including the Battle of Flodden in 1513. William, 3rd Lord of Graham, was created Earl of Montrose in 1504. The 5th Earl, who was called the ldquo;Great Montrose, was created Marquis of Montrose in 1644. His ability as a soldier was outstanding, as was his campaign in Scotland on behalf of the king. He was executed in 1650. The 4th Marquis was raised to the Dukedom of Montrose in 1707. The Grahams of Menteith are an important branch of Clan Graham. (view tartan)
Graham Menteith Modern
The Grahams of Menteith are an important branch of Clan Graham.The Graham's trace their origin to a date before the 12th century. Known as the ldquo;Gallant Grahams, they were chivalrous knights and fought in many of Scotlands battles, including the Battle of Flodden in 1513. William, 3rd Lord of Graham, was created Earl of Montrose in 1504. The 5th Earl, who was called the ldquo;Great Montrose, was created Marquis of Montrose in 1644. His ability as a soldier was outstanding, as was his campaign in Scotland on behalf of the king. He was executed in 1650. The 4th Marquis was raised to the Dukedom of Montrose in 1707. (view tartan)
Graham Menteith Weathered
The Grahams of Menteith are an important branch of Clan Graham.The Graham's trace their origin to a date before the 12th century. Known as the ldquo;Gallant Grahams, they were chivalrous knights and fought in many of Scotlands battles, including the Battle of Flodden in 1513. William, 3rd Lord of Graham, was created Earl of Montrose in 1504. The 5th Earl, who was called the ldquo;Great Montrose, was created Marquis of Montrose in 1644. His ability as a soldier was outstanding, as was his campaign in Scotland on behalf of the king. He was executed in 1650. The 4th Marquis was raised to the Dukedom of Montrose in 1707. (view tartan)
Graham Montrose Ancient
The Grahams of Montrose trace their origin to a date before the 12th century. Known as the ldquo;Gallant Grahams, they were chivalrous knights and fought in many of Scotlands battles, including the Battle of Flodden in 1513. William, 3rd Lord of Graham, was created Earl of Montrose in 1504. The 5th Earl, who was called the ldquo;Great Montrose, was created Marquis of Montrose in 1644. His ability as a soldier was outstanding, as was his campaign in Scotland on behalf of the king. He was executed in 1650. The 4th Marquis was raised to the Dukedom of Montrose in 1707. (view tartan)
Graham Montrose Modern
The Grahams of Montrose trace their origin to a date before the 12th century. Known as the ldquo;Gallant Grahams, they were chivalrous knights and fought in many of Scotlands battles, including the Battle of Flodden in 1513. William, 3rd Lord of Graham, was created Earl of Montrose in 1504. The 5th Earl, who was called the ldquo;Great Montrose, was created Marquis of Montrose in 1644. His ability as a soldier was outstanding, as was his campaign in Scotland on behalf of the king. He was executed in 1650. The 4th Marquis was raised to the Dukedom of Montrose in 1707. (view tartan)
Graham Montrose Weathered
The Grahams of Montrose trace their origin to a date before the 12th century. Known as the ldquo;Gallant Grahams, they were chivalrous knights and fought in many of Scotlands battles, including the Battle of Flodden in 1513. William, 3rd Lord of Graham, was created Earl of Montrose in 1504. The 5th Earl, who was called the ldquo;Great Montrose, was created Marquis of Montrose in 1644. His ability as a soldier was outstanding, as was his campaign in Scotland on behalf of the king. He was executed in 1650. The 4th Marquis was raised to the Dukedom of Montrose in 1707. (view tartan)
Grant Ancient
Speyside is the home of the Clan Grant and they have been settled there since about the 13th century. Early chiefs of this clan held office as Sheriffs of Inverness and by virtue of this high office had great influence upon neighbouring territories. There are several important branches of the Clan, including that of Glenmoriston which dates from the 16th century. The Grants participated in battles in support of King and Government, but during the Jacobite Rebellions of 1715 and 1745 they did not support the exiled house of Stewart. The Grants of Glenmoriston, however, fought for the Jacobite cause on both occasions. (view tartan)
Grant Hunting Ancient
Speyside is the home of the Clan Grant and they have been settled there since about the 13th century. Early chiefs of this clan held office as Sheriffs of Inverness and by virtue of this high office had great influence upon neighbouring territories. There are several important branches of the Clan, including that of Glenmoriston which dates from the 16th century. The Grants participated in battle in support of King and Government, but during the Jacobite Rebellions of 1715 and 1745 they did not support the exiled house of Stewart. The Grants of Glenmoriston, however, fought for the Jacobite cause on both occasions. (view tartan)
Grant Hunting Modern
Speyside is the home of the Clan Grant and they have been settled there since about the 13th century. Early chiefs of this clan held office as Sheriffs of Inverness and by virtue of this high office had great influence upon neighbouring territories. There are several important branches of the Clan, including that of Glenmoriston which dates from the 16th century. The Grants participated in battle in support of King and Government, but during the Jacobite Rebellions of 1715 and 1745 they did not support the exiled house of Stewart. The Grants of Glenmoriston, however, fought for the Jacobite cause on both occasions. (view tartan)
Grant Hunting Weathered
Speyside is the home of the Clan Grant and they have been settled there since about the 13th century. Early chiefs of this clan held office as Sheriffs of Inverness and by virtue of this high office had great influence upon neighbouring territories. There are several important branches of the Clan, including that of Glenmoriston which dates from the 16th century. The Grants participated in battle in support of King and Government, but during the Jacobite Rebellions of 1715 and 1745 they did not support the exiled house of Stewart. The Grants of Glenmoriston, however, fought for the Jacobite cause on both occasions. (view tartan)
Grant Modern
Speyside is the home of the Clan Grant and they have been settled there since about the 13th century. Early chiefs of this clan held office as Sheriffs of Inverness and by virtue of this high office had great influence upon neighbouring territories. There are several important branches of the Clan, including that of Glenmoriston which dates from the 16th century. The Grants participated in battle in support of King and Government, but during the Jacobite Rebellions of 1715 and 1745 they did not support the exiled house of Stewart. The Grants of Glenmoriston, however, fought for the Jacobite cause on both occasions. (view tartan)
Guardian of Scotland Dress
A tartan that spans the centuries. Without doubt, two of the most important men in Scottish history over the past thousand years were William Wallace and Robert the Bruce. It is also unique that they lived at the same time and actually knew each other. After the Battle of Stirling Brig in 1297, Wallace led his army back to the Ettrick Forest and its capital, Selkirk. The Royal and Ancient Burgh of Selkirk was described as ldquo;a very old town by King David I in 1133. It was here, near the ancient Kirk o The Forest, that Bruce and the Nobles conferred the title ldquo;Guardian of Scotland on the young man who had led the Scots in the rout of the English. All of Scotlands ruling classes were there and it is fitting that a new memorial tartan has been designed and produced in Selkirk. The designer of the new tartan, Gerald Reilly, a Souter* of Selkirk, designed the ldquo;Guardian of Scotland tartan to encompass the rich colours of Bruce and Wallace tartans, the true blue and scarlet of Selkirk and the Saltire of St Andrew. Gerald says ldquo;What better reason could there be than to commemorate the meeting in Selkirk, of two of the greatest men in Scottish history, when one conferred this great honour on the other. ldquo;The Kirk o The Forest is a hugely significant historical site in Scotlands story and not only did Wallace and Bruce worship there, the maternal ancestors of the US President Franklin D Roosevelt are buried there. Once again The Bruce and Wallace meet In a weave of tartan with sett complete *Souter ndash; a native of Selkirk (view tartan)
Gunn Ancient
Caithness and Sutherland was the home of the Gunns, for whom a Norse origin is claimed. They were frequently engaged in clan warfare and did battle with the Keiths, MacKays and Sutherlands. In an effort to settle their dispute with the Keiths, a meeting was arranged in 1464 between both clans, but the Keiths treacherously attacked the Gunns and slew the chief. This chief, George Gunn, held the office of Crowner and lived in regal style at Clyth Castle. His badge of office as Crowner was a large silver brooch from which he was known as ldquo;Am Braiteach Mor. The name comes from the Norse ldquo;Gunnar. (view tartan)
Gunn Modern
Caithness and Sutherland was the home of the Gunns, for whom a Norse origin is claimed. They were frequently engaged in clan warfare and did battle with the Keiths, MacKays and Sutherlands. In an effort to settle their dispute with the Keiths, a meeting was arranged in 1464 between both clans, but the Keiths treacherously attacked the Gunns and slew the chief. This chief, George Gunn, held the office of Crowner and lived in regal style at Clyth Castle. His badge of office as Crowner was a large silver brooch from which he was known as ldquo;Am Braiteach Mor. The name comes from the Norse ldquo;Gunnar. (view tartan)
Gunn Weathered
Caithness and Sutherland was the home of the Gunns, for whom a Norse origin is claimed. They were frequently engaged in clan warfare and did battle with the Keiths, MacKays and Sutherlands. In an effort to settle their dispute with the Keiths, a meeting was arranged in 1464 between both clans, but the Keiths treacherously attacked the Gunns and slew the chief. This chief, George Gunn, held the office of Crowner and lived in regal style at Clyth Castle. His badge of office as Crowner was a large silver brooch from which he was known as ldquo;Am Braiteach Mor. The name comes from the Norse ldquo;Gunnar. (view tartan)
Guthrie Ancient
The surname Guthrie originates from the barony of that name in Angus which is near Forfar, altough it is said to derive from Guthrum, a Scandinavian prince. It was Squire Guthrie who brought Sir William Wallace back to Scotland from France in 1299. Sir David Guthrie was the Kings Treasurer in the fifteenth century and built Guthrie Castle, near Friockheim, in 1468. (view tartan)
Guthrie Modern
The surname Guthrie originates from the barony of that name in Angus which is near Forfar, altough it is said to derive from Guthrum, a Scandinavian prince. It was Squire Guthrie who brought Sir William Wallace back to Scotland from France in 1299. Sir David Guthrie was the Kings Treasurer in the fifteenth century and built Guthrie Castle, near Friockheim, in 1468. (view tartan)
Hamilton Green Ancient
Walter Fitz-Gilbert, from whom descended the Dukes of Hamilton, was ancestor of this family. During the Scottish War of Independence he held Bothwell Castle for the English, but later transferred his support to Robert the Bruce. He was rewarded with the Barony of Cadzow. In 1445 the 6th Lord Cadzow was created Lord Hamilton and later the titles of the Marquis (in 1503) and Duke of Hamilton (1599) were conferred on the family. The Hamilton chiefs held many high offices and the 1st Duke was given hereditary keepership of the Palace of Holyroodhouse. There were many important branches of this family. (view tartan)
Hamilton Green Modern
Walter Fitz-Gilbert, from whom descended the Dukes of Hamilton, was ancestor of this family. During the Scottish War of Independence he held Bothwell Castle for the English, but later transferred his support to Robert the Bruce. He was rewarded with the Barony of Cadzow. In 1445 the 6th Lord Cadzow was created Lord Hamilton and later the titles of the Marquis (in 1503) and Duke of Hamilton (1599) were conferred on the family. The Hamilton chiefs held many high offices and the 1st Duke was given hereditary keepership of the Palace of Holyroodhouse. There were many important branches of this family. (view tartan)
Hamilton Red Ancient
Walter Fitz-Gilbert, from whom descended the Dukes of Hamilton, was ancestor of this family. During the Scottish War of Independence he held Bothwell Castle for the English, but later transferred his support to Robert the Bruce. He was rewarded with the Barony of Cadzow. In 1445 the 6th Lord Cadzow was created Lord Hamilton and later the titles of the Marquis (in 1503) and Duke of Hamilton (1599) were conferred on the family. The Hamilton chiefs held many high offices and the 1st Duke was given hereditary keepership of the Palace of Holyroodhouse. There were many important branches of this family. (view tartan)
Hamilton Red Modern
Walter Fitz-Gilbert, from whom descended the Dukes of Hamilton, was ancestor of this family. During the Scottish War of Independence he held Bothwell Castle for the English, but later transferred his support to Robert the Bruce. He was rewarded with the Barony of Cadzow. In 1445 the 6th Lord Cadzow was created Lord Hamilton and later the titles of the Marquis (in 1503) and Duke of Hamilton (1599) were conferred on the family. The Hamilton chiefs held many high offices and the 1st Duke was given hereditary keepership of the Palace of Holyroodhouse. There were many important branches of this family. (view tartan)
Hamilton Red Weathered
Walter Fitz-Gilbert, from whom descended the Dukes of Hamilton, was ancestor of this family. During the Scottish War of Independence he held Bothwell Castle for the English, but later transferred his support to Robert the Bruce. He was rewarded with the Barony of Cadzow. In 1445 the 6th Lord Cadzow was created Lord Hamilton and later the titles of the Marquis (in 1503) and Duke of Hamilton (1599) were conferred on the family. The Hamilton chiefs held many high offices and the 1st Duke was given hereditary keepership of the Palace of Holyroodhouse. There were many important branches of this family. (view tartan)
Hannay Ancient
The large White content of this Tartan gives a strong indication that it is relatively Modern in design, obviously produced after the period of proscription and, in fact, the oldest sample can be traced back to the late Eighteenth Century, having being worn by Commander Alex. Hannay 1788-1844. The family name is predominantly from the Galloway region in South West Scotland. (view tartan)
Hay Ancient
William De Hay, the progenitor of this family, received the Barony of Erroll in the 12th century. He was cupbearer to King Malcolm IV of Scotland. Sir Gilbert, 5th of Erroll, a staunch supporter of Robert the Bruce, was appointed Hereditary High Constable of Scotland. In 1452 Sir William Erroll was created Earl of Erroll. The Erroll family took an active part in affairs of state. Slains Castle, Aberdeenshire, now in ruins, was the ancient seat of the chiefs. The office of Hereditary High Constable of Scotland is still held by the chief. The Hays of Yester descend from the family as the Earls of Erroll. The 8th Lord Hay of Yester was created Earl of Tweeddale in 1646. In 1694 the 2nd Earl was created Marquess of Tweeddale. (view tartan)
Hay And Leith Modern
William De Hay, the progenitor of this family, received the Barony of Erroll in the 12th century. He was cupbearer to King Malcolm IV of Scotland. Sir Gilbert, 5th of Erroll, a staunch supporter of Robert the Bruce, was appointed Hereditary High Constable of Scotland. In 1452 Sir William Erroll was created Earl of Erroll. The Erroll family took an active part in affairs of state. Slains Castle, Aberdeenshire, now in ruins, was the ancient seat of the chiefs. The office of Hereditary High Constable of Scotland is still held by the chief. The Hays of Yester descend from the family as the Earls of Erroll. The 8th Lord Hay of Yester was created Earl of Tweeddale in 1646. In 1694 the 2nd Earl was created Marquess of Tweeddale. (view tartan)
Hay Modern
William De Hay, the progenitor of this Family, received the Barony of Erroll in the 12th century. He was cupbearer to King Malcom Iv of Scotalnd. Sir Gilbert, 5th of Erroll, a staunch supporter of Robert the Bruce, was appointed Hereitary High Constable of Scotland.In 1452 Sir William Erroll was created Earl of Erroll. The Erroll Family took an active part in affairs of state. Slains Castle, Aberdeenshire, now in ruins, was the ancient seat of the chiefs. The office of Hereitary High Constable of Scotland is still held by the Chief. The Hays of Yester descend from the family as the Earls of Errol.The 8th Lord Hay of Yester was created Earl of Tweeddale in 1646. In 1694 the 2nd Earl was created marquess of Tweedale. (view tartan)
Heather (Plain)
(view tartan)
Henderson Ancient
In the 14th and 15th centuries this name was found in various parts of Scotland. The Hendersons of Glencoe claim to have occupied that glen before the advent of the MacDonalds, and further allege that the ancestress of the MacDonalds was the daughter of the Henderson chief. In the north the Hendersons are septs of Clan Gunn and claim to be descended from Henry, son of George Gunn the famous ldquo;crowner of the 15th century. From the Hendersons of Fordell in Angus descended the noted divine, William Henderson (1583ndash;1646). In the Highlands the name is often rendered as MacKendrick from the Gaelic MacEanruig meaning ldquo;son of Henry. (view tartan)
Henderson Modern
In the 14th and 15th centuries this name was found in various parts of Scotland. The Hendersons of Glencoe claim to have occupied that glen before the advent of the MacDonalds, and further allege that the ancestress of the MacDonalds was the daughter of the Henderson chief. In the north the Hendersons are septs of Clan Gunn and claim to be descended from Henry, son of George Gunn the famous ldquo;crowner of the 15th century. From the Hendersons of Fordell in Angus descended the noted divine, William Henderson (1583ndash;1646). In the Highlands the name is often rendered as MacKendrick from the Gaelic MacEanruig meaning ldquo;son of Henry. (view tartan)
Henderson Weathered
In the 14th and 15th centuries this name was found in various parts of Scotland. The Hendersons of Glencoe claim to have occupied that glen before the advent of the MacDonalds, and further allege that the ancestress of the MacDonalds was the daughter of the Henderson chief. In the north the Hendersons are septs of Clan Gunn and claim to be descended from Henry, son of George Gunn the famous ldquo;crowner of the 15th century. From the Hendersons of Fordell in Angus descended the noted divine, William Henderson (1583ndash;1646). In the Highlands the name is often rendered as MacKendrick from the Gaelic MacEanruig meaning ldquo;son of Henry. (view tartan)
Hepburn Ancient
(view tartan)
Highland Granite
This is the original tartan design, grey tartan,grey plaid, (view tartan)
Highland Granite Blue
From the Highland Granite Wedding Collection - Available in 5 colours - Heavy Weight Tartan, grey tartan,grey plaid, (view tartan)
Highland Granite Mauve
From the Highland Granite Wedding Collection - Available in 5 colours - Heavy Weight Tartan,grey tartan,grey plaid, (view tartan)
Highland Granite Pink
From the Highland Granite Wedding Collection - Available in 5 colours - Heavy Weight Tartan,grey tartan,grey plaid, (view tartan)
Highland Granite Sage
From the Highland Granite Wedding Collection - Available in 5 colours - Heavy Weight Tartan,grey tartan,grey plaid, (view tartan)
Home Ancient
An ancestor of this family was Patrick, son of the Earl of Dunbar, who lived early in the 13th century. Alexander Home was created a Baron in 1473 and the title was raised to an Earldom by James VI in 1605. Eventually it was the family of Home of Coldingknow which succeeded, from which is directly descended that 14th Earl, who, for political reasons, resigned his earldom to become Sir Alex Douglas-Home and Prime Minster of the United Kingdom. Various other branches of this distinguished Border family gained titles, which subsequently died out. (view tartan)
Home Modern
An ancestor of this family was Patrick, son of the Earl of Dunbar, who lived early in the 13th century. Alexander Home was created a Baron in 1473 and the title was raised to an Earldom by James VI in 1605. Eventually it was the family of Home of Coldingknow which succeeded, from which is directly descended that 14th Earl, who, for political reasons, resigned his earldom to become Sir Alex Douglas-Home and Prime Minster of the United Kingdom. Various other branches of this distinguished Border family gained titles, which subsequently died out. (view tartan)
Hunter Ancient
This name is fairly common throughout Scotland. It is, of course, derived from the hunt (or chase) and in old documents is given as Venator. It is impossible to trace a common ancestor for this family who, in the 11th and 12th centuries, are found in the Highlands as well as in the Lowlands. The family of Hunter of Hunterston, Ayrshire, would appear to be the oldest family of the name. Other Hunter families were those of Polmood, Abbotshall, Auchterarder and Thurston. As mentioned above, the name was originally Latinised Venator, but by the 16th century the forms of Huntair, Hunayr, Hounttar and Hunttar were being used. (view tartan)
Hunter Modern
This name is fairly common throughout Scotland. It is, of course, derived from the hunt (or chase) and in old documents is given as Venator. It is impossible to trace a common ancestor for this family who, in the 11th and 12th centuries, are found in the Highlands as well as in the Lowlands. The family of Hunter of Hunterston, Ayrshire, would appear to be the oldest family of the name. Other Hunter families were those of Polmood, Abbotshall, Auchterarder and Thurston. As mentioned above, the name was originally Latinised Venator, but by the 16th century the forms of Huntair, Hunayr, Hounttar and Hunttar were being used. (view tartan)
Inglis Ancient
This name derives from the Scots 'Englis', meaning an Englishman, and in the early Latin documents it is rendered Anglicus. One of the name figures in David I's famous Charter to the Abbey of Melrose, a fact to be expected since this family first appears in Border history. During the 12th century the Inglises spread widely and were to be found from Kintyre to Aberdeen. Those of the Kintyre branch appear to have retained their early allegiance to the South, for, in 1300, Malcolm 'le fiz Lengleys' had a safe conduct by land or sea, with his men or with his galleys, to attack and capture any Scots whom he might encounter. Alexander Lenglis, Archdeacon of St. Andrews, has his name spelt both as 'Inglys' and 'English'. It was probably this same Alexander who was Ambassador for the King of Scots in 1478. The name was carried to France, where it appeared as D'Anglars. In Scotland, it is occasionally found as Angel. (view tartan)
Inglis Modern
This name derives from the Scots 'Englis', meaning an Englishman, and in the early Latin documents it is rendered Anglicus. One of the name figures in David I's famous Charter to the Abbey of Melrose, a fact to be expected since this family first appears in Border history. During the 12th century the Inglises spread widely and were to be found from Kintyre to Aberdeen. Those of the Kintyre branch appear to have retained their early allegiance to the South, for, in 1300, Malcolm 'le fiz Lengleys' had a safe conduct by land or sea, with his men or with his galleys, to attack and capture any Scots whom he might encounter. Alexander Lenglis, Archdeacon of St. Andrews, has his name spelt both as 'Inglys' and 'English'. It was probably this same Alexander who was Ambassador for the King of Scots in 1478. The name was carried to France, where it appeared as D'Anglars. In Scotland, it is occasionally found as Angel. (view tartan)
Innes Red Ancient
This Clan was to be found in Moray as early as the 12th century. Malcolm IV granted a charter of the lands of Innes to Berowald in 1160. the name Innes was adopted by his grandson. Robert, the 20th Chief of the Innes Clan, was created a Baronet in 1625. In 1767 the lands of Innes were sold by Sir James, 6th Baronet, to the Earl of Fife. On the death of the 4th Duke of Roxburgh, Sir James claimed and was granted the Scottish titles of that family. He assumed the name Ker and became the 5th Duke of Roxburgh. James, the 6th Duke, was created Earl Innes. (view tartan)
Innes Red Modern
This Clan was to be found in Moray as early as the 12th century. Malcolm IV granted a charter of the lands of Innes to Berowald in 1160. the name Innes was adopted by his grandson. Robert, the 20th Chief of the Innes Clan, was created a Baronet in 1625. In 1767 the lands of Innes were sold by Sir James, 6th Baronet, to the Earl of Fife. On the death of the 4th Duke of Roxburgh, Sir James claimed and was granted the Scottish titles of that family. He assumed the name Ker and became the 5th Duke of Roxburgh. James, the 6th Duke, was created Earl Innes. Badge - Great Bullrush. (view tartan)
Innes Red Weathered
This Clan was to be found in Moray as early as the 12th century. Malcolm IV granted a charter of the lands of Innes to Berowald in 1160. the name Innes was adopted by his grandson. Robert, the 20th Chief of the Innes Clan, was created a Baronet in 1625. In 1767 the lands of Innes were sold by Sir James, 6th Baronet, to the Earl of Fife. On the death of the 4th Duke of Roxburgh, Sir James claimed and was granted the Scottish titles of that family. He assumed the name Ker and became the 5th Duke of Roxburgh. James, the 6th Duke, was created Earl Innes. (view tartan)
Inverness Ancient
The Inverness tartan was, or is claimed to have been, designed and made for His Royal Highness the Duke of Sussex about 1822. The Duke was also Earl of Inverness and the tartan was named in honour of his Scottish title. His late Majesty King George VI wore it, as did the present Queen when a small girl. It was the first tartan to appear as a colour illustration in any book on tartans. (view tartan)
Inverness Modern
The Inverness tartan was, or is claimed to have been, designed and made for His Royal Highness the Duke of Sussex about 1822. The Duke was also Earl of Inverness and the tartan was named in honour of his Scottish title. His late Majesty King George VI wore it, as did the present Queen when a small girl. It was the first tartan to appear as a colour illustration in any book on tartans. (view tartan)
Irvine Ancient
The actual name 'Irvine' is an Old English personal name. But the origin of the surname is territorial, from Irving, an old parish in Dumfriesshire (though the families of this part prefer the spelling 'Irvine'). There is another parish in Ayrshire of the same name, which undoubtedly produced some families of Irvine. The well-known Aberdeenshire family of Irvine of Drum descends from William de Irvine who obtained the free barony of Drum in 1324. Sir Alexander of Drum fell at Harlaw, in 1411. In 1587, an Act of Parliament recognised the Irvings of Boneshaw as 'chief family of the name'. There have been many members of the family distinguished in every walk of life. In the arts, Washington Irving, the famous American author, was son of an Orkney man, and one of the finest actors of modern times was Sir Henry Irving. (view tartan)
Irvine Modern
The actual name 'Irvine' is an Old English personal name. But the origin of the surname is territorial, from Irving, an old parish in Dumfriesshire (though the families of this part prefer the spelling 'Irvine'). There is another parish in Ayrshire of the same name, which undoubtedly produced some families of Irvine. The well-known Aberdeenshire family of Irvine of Drum descends from William de Irvine who obtained the free barony of Drum in 1324. Sir Alexander of Drum fell at Harlaw, in 1411. In 1587, an Act of Parliament recognised the Irvings of Boneshaw as 'chief family of the name'. There have been many members of the family distinguished in every walk of life. In the arts, Washington Irving, the famous American author, was son of an Orkney man, and one of the finest actors of modern times was Sir Henry Irving. (view tartan)
Irvine Weathered
The actual name 'Irvine' is an Old English personal name. But the origin of the surname is territorial, from Irving, an old parish in Dumfriesshire (though the families of this part prefer the spelling 'Irvine'). There is another parish in Ayrshire of the same name, which undoubtedly produced some families of Irvine. The well-known Aberdeenshire family of Irvine of Drum descends from William de Irvine who obtained the free barony of Drum in 1324. Sir Alexander of Drum fell at Harlaw, in 1411. In 1587, an Act of Parliament recognised the Irvings of Boneshaw as 'chief family of the name'. There have been many members of the family distinguished in every walk of life. In the arts, Washington Irving, the famous American author, was son of an Orkney man, and one of the finest actors of modern times was Sir Henry Irving. (view tartan)
Isle of Skye
This beautiful tartan was instigated and registered by Mrs Rosemary Nicolson Samios in 1992, an Australian of Skye descent, now living in Skye. It was selected through a worldwide competition won by Angus MacLeod from Lewis. Angus, a weaver to trade, produced the first commercial quantities in traditional kilt weight in 1993 at Lochcarron Weavers in North Strome, within view of the Cuillin Mountains. The colours of the tartan depict those of the island, often called the ldquo;Misty Isle. Mrs Samios controls the rights to the production of this ldquo;Isle of Skye district tartan through registration with the Patents Office and Lochcarron of Scotland has been appointed as the supplier of fabrics and woven accessories in this tartan. (view tartan)
Johnstone Ancient
This Border clan takes its name from the Barony of Johnston in Annandale where they appear to have been settled by the 13th century. They took a prominent part in Border warfare and had considerable power. They were loyal to the Crown and Sir James Johnston of Johnston was created Lord Johnston of Lochwood in 1633, 10 years later he was created Earl of Hartfell, his son was created Earl of Annandale in 1661. The Johnstons of Westerhall, Dumfriesshire, were an important family, of whom John, 2nd of Westerhall, was created a Baronet of Nova Scotia in 1700. The Johnstons of the north were another important branch. (view tartan)
Johnstone Modern
This Border clan takes its name from the Barony of Johnston in Annandale where they appear to have been settled by the 13th century. They took a prominent part in Border warfare and had considerable power. They were loyal to the Crown and Sir James Johnston of Johnston was created Lord Johnston of Lochwood in 1633, 10 years later he was created Earl of Hartfell, his son was created Earl of Annandale in 1661. The Johnstons of Westerhall, Dumfriesshire, were an important family, of whom John, 2nd of Westerhall, was created a Baronet of Nova Scotia in 1700. The Johnstons of the north were another important branch. (view tartan)
Johnstone Weathered
This Border clan takes its name from the Barony of Johnston in Annandale where they appear to have been settled by the 13th century. They took a prominent part in Border warfare and had considerable power. They were loyal to the Crown and Sir James Johnston of Johnston was created Lord Johnston of Lochwood in 1633, 10 years later he was created Earl of Hartfell, his son was created Earl of Annandale in 1661. The Johnstons of Westerhall, Dumfriesshire, were an important family, of whom John, 2nd of Westerhall, was created a Baronet of Nova Scotia in 1700. The Johnstons of the north were another important branch. (view tartan)
Keith Ancient
The Keiths are an ancient family and as early as the 12th century held the office of Great Marischal of Scotland. Sir William Keith, about 1390, built the historic Dunottar Castle, Sir Robert Keith was created Lord Keith and the 2nd Lord was elevated to Earl Marischal in 1458. Marischal College, Aberdeen, was founded by the Earl Marischal. The Earl Marischal took the Jacobite side in the 1715 Rising and after the failure of that attempt he went to the Continent. There he won a high reputation for his military ability and became a General in the Russian Army in 1737. He was a close friend of Frederick the Great, who made him a Field Marshal. He died in 1758. (view tartan)
Keith Modern
The Keiths are an ancient family and as early as the 12th century held the office of Great Marischal of Scotland. Sir William Keith, about 1390, built the historic Dunottar Castle, Sir Robert Keith was created Lord Keith and the 2nd Lord was elevated to Earl Marischal in 1458. Marischal College, Aberdeen, was founded by the Earl Marischal. The Earl Marischal took the Jacobite side in the 1715 Rising and after the failure of that attempt he went to the Continent. There he won a high reputation for his military ability and became a General in the Russian Army in 1737. He was a close friend of Frederick the Great, who made him a Field Marshal. He died in 1758. (view tartan)
Kennedy Ancient
The Clan Kennedy are an ancient family and were settled in Galloway in the 12th century. They descended from the first Earl of Carrick. The Kennedies of Dunure, by marriage, became the chief family. Gilbert Kennedy of Dunure, who was one of the six Regents of Scotland during the minority of King James III, was created Lord Kennedy in 1457. The 3rd Lord was made Earl of Cassillis in 1509. The 12th Earl was created Baron Ailsa in 1806, and in 1836 Marquess of Ailsa. The Kennedies of Lochaber and the north claim descent from Ulric Kennedy, who fled from Ayrshire and settled in Lochaber. They are known as Clan Ulric. (view tartan)
Kennedy Modern
The Clan Kennedy are an ancient family and were settled in Galloway in the 12th century. They descended from the first Earl of Carrick. The Kennedies of Dunure, by marriage, became the chief family. Gilbert Kennedy of Dunure, who was one of the six Regents of Scotland during the minority of King James III, was created Lord Kennedy in 1457. The 3rd Lord was made Earl of Cassillis in 1509. The 12th Earl was created Baron Ailsa in 1806, and in 1836 Marquess of Ailsa. The Kennedies of Lochaber and the north claim descent from Ulric Kennedy, who fled from Ayrshire and settled in Lochaber. They are known as Clan Ulric. (view tartan)
Kennedy Weathered
The Clan Kennedy are an ancient family and were settled in Galloway in the 12th century. They descended from the first Earl of Carrick. The Kennedies of Dunure, by marriage, became the chief family. Gilbert Kennedy of Dunure, who was one of the six Regents of Scotland during the minority of King James III, was created Lord Kennedy in 1457. The 3rd Lord was made Earl of Cassillis in 1509. The 12th Earl was created Baron Ailsa in 1806, and in 1836 Marquess of Ailsa. The Kennedies of Lochaber and the north claim descent from Ulric Kennedy, who fled from Ayrshire and settled in Lochaber. They are known as Clan Ulric. (view tartan)
Kerr Ancient
This old family, said to be of Norman descent, are recorded in the Borders in the 12th century. The two main families were the Kerrs of Cessford, now represented by the Duke of Roxburghe, and the Kerrs of Ferniehurst, represented by the Marquis of Lothian, Sir Andrew Kerr of Ferniehurst was Warden of the Middle Marches in 1502, and when his castle was besieged by the English he defended it so ferociously that the besiegers alleged he was helped by the devil. Robert Kerr, Earl of Lothian and Ancrum, was created Marquis of Lothian in 1701. There were other important branches of this family, including Fawdonsyde and Cavers-Carre. (view tartan)
Kerr Modern
This old family, said to be of Norman descent, are recorded in the Borders in the 12th century. The two main families were the Kerrs of Cessford, now represented by the Duke of Roxburghe, and the Kerrs of Ferniehurst, represented by the Marquis of Lothian, Sir Andrew Kerr of Ferniehurst was Warden of the Middle Marches in 1502, and when his castle was besieged by the English he defended it so ferociously that the besiegers alleged he was helped by the devil. Robert Kerr, Earl of Lothian and Ancrum, was created Marquis of Lothian in 1701. There were other important branches of this family, including Fawdonsyde and Cavers-Carre. (view tartan)
Kerr Weathered
This old family, said to be of Norman descent, are recorded in the Borders in the 12th century. The two main families were the Kerrs of Cessford, now represented by the Duke of Roxburghe, and the Kerrs of Ferniehurst, represented by the Marquis of Lothian, Sir Andrew Kerr of Ferniehurst was Warden of the Middle Marches in 1502, and when his castle was besieged by the English he defended it so ferociously that the besiegers alleged he was helped by the devil. Robert Kerr, Earl of Lothian and Ancrum, was created Marquis of Lothian in 1701. There were other important branches of this family, including Fawdonsyde and Cavers-Carre. (view tartan)
Kidd Ancient
The origins of this Tartan can be traced to 1819 when it was also known as Caledonia and MacPherson. At that time the Tartan was predominantly sold to a Dealer called Kidd in Angus. However, the name Kidd can be found generally throughout the British Isles and can be traced back to the English Kidde meaning a Woodman, or a seller of faggots. (view tartan)
Kilgour Modern
It is believed that this surname originated at Kilgour, near Falkland in Fifeshire, where it has been known since the 16th century. Later the name appears in Aberdeenshire and Perthshire. Like most surnames, the form of spelling has varied during the passing of centuries. The older forms were Kilgor, Kilgowre and Kilgoure. (view tartan)
Kincaid Ancient
(view tartan)
Lamont Ancient
In earlier times the Lamonts possessed considerable lands in Argyllshire, but through the encroachment of other clans their territory was reduced to Cowal. The early chiefs were known as Lamont of Inveryne. John Lamont was, in 1539, knighted and his lands made into the Barony of Inveryne. Toward Castle, the old seat of the chiefs, was destroyed by the Campbells and, in 1646, 300 Lamonts were massacred. Thereafter Ardlamont became the home of the chiefs. The Lamonts were called Clan ic Fhearchair (MacKeracher) after their first known chief Ferchar, who was alive about 1200. Ferchars grandson, Laumun, held a judicial position as ldquo;law man and his office became the surname of his clan. (view tartan)
Lamont Modern
In earlier times the Lamonts possessed considerable lands in Argyllshire, but through the encroachment of other clans their territory was reduced to Cowal. The early chiefs were known as Lamont of Inveryne. John Lamont was, in 1539, knighted and his lands made into the Barony of Inveryne. Toward Castle, the old seat of the chiefs, was destroyed by the Campbells and, in 1646, 300 Lamonts were massacred. Thereafter Ardlamont became the home of the chiefs. The Lamonts were called Clan ic Fhearchair (MacKeracher) after their first known chief Ferchar, who was alive about 1200. Ferchars grandson, Laumun, held a judicial position as ldquo;law man and his office became the surname of his clan. (view tartan)
Lamont Weathered
In earlier times the Lamonts possessed considerable lands in Argyllshire, but through the encroachment of other clans their territory was reduced to Cowal. The early chiefs were known as Lamont of Inveryne. John Lamont was, in 1539, knighted and his lands made into the Barony of Inveryne. Toward Castle, the old seat of the chiefs, was destroyed by the Campbells and, in 1646, 300 Lamonts were massacred. Thereafter Ardlamont became the home of the chiefs. The Lamonts were called Clan ic Fhearchair (MacKeracher) after their first known chief Ferchar, who was alive about 1200. Ferchars grandson, Laumun, held a judicial position as ldquo;law man and his office became the surname of his clan. (view tartan)
Lauder Modern
This surname is a territorial one derived from the lands of Lauder in Berwickshire. The Lauders were of Norman descent. They possessed the Bass Rock, in the Firth of Forth, in the 13th century. Sir Robert de Lauder was Justicar of the Lothians in 1323, and his son possessed the Quarrelwood estate in Nairnshire. William Lauder, Bishop of Glasgow, was Chancellor of Scotland in 1423. John Lauder of Newington was created a Baronet of Nova Scotia in 1688 and his son, Sir John Lauder of Fountainhall, was appointed on of the Senators of the College of Justice in 1689. (view tartan)
Leask Ancient
(view tartan)
Lennox Ancient
This surname is derived from the district of Lennox which, in earlier times, embraced the County of Dumbarton and part of the counties of Stirling, Renfrew and Perth. The Lennox tartan is regarded as a district tartan. Lord Darnley, husband of Mary, Queen of Scots, bore the title of Earl of Lennox. (view tartan)
Lennox Modern
This surname is derived from the district of Lennox which, in earlier times, embraced the County of Dumbarton and part of the counties of Stirling, Renfrew and Perth. The Lennox tartan is regarded as a district tartan. Lord Darnley, husband of Mary, Queen of Scots, bore the title of Earl of Lennox. (view tartan)
Leslie Green Ancient
The Barony of Leslie in Aberdeenshire came into the possession of this family in the 12th century. Sir Andrew Leslie was created Earl of Rothes by King James II of Scotland. This Sir Andrew signed the letter of 1329 to the Pope asserting the Independence of Scotland. George, the 3rd Earl, was involved in the murder of Cardinal Beaton. John, 7th Earl, supported King Charles II, and after the Restoration was High Treasurer and Captain of the Scottish Life Guards. He was created Duke of Rothes in 1680. His grandson, John, succeeded him as Earl of Rothes. Sir Andrew Leslie, created Earl of Leven in 1641, was a Field Marshal under Gustavus Adolphus. (view tartan)
Leslie Green Modern
The Barony of Leslie in Aberdeenshire came into the possession of this family in the 12th century. Sir Andrew Leslie was created Earl of Rothes by King James II of Scotland. This Sir Andrew signed the letter of 1329 to the Pope asserting the Independence of Scotland. George, the 3rd Earl, was involved in the murder of Cardinal Beaton. John, 7th Earl, supported King Charles II, and after the Restoration was High Treasurer and Captain of the Scottish Life Guards. He was created Duke of Rothes in 1680. His grandson, John, succeeded him as Earl of Rothes. Sir Andrew Leslie, created Earl of Leven in 1641, was a Field Marshal under Gustavus Adolphus. (view tartan)
Leslie Green Weathered
The Barony of Leslie in Aberdeenshire came into the possession of this family in the 12th century. Sir Andrew Leslie was created Earl of Rothes by King James II of Scotland. This Sir Andrew signed the letter of 1329 to the Pope asserting the Independence of Scotland. George, the 3rd Earl, was involved in the murder of Cardinal Beaton. John, 7th Earl, supported King Charles II, and after the Restoration was High Treasurer and Captain of the Scottish Life Guards. He was created Duke of Rothes in 1680. His grandson, John, succeeded him as Earl of Rothes. Sir Andrew Leslie, created Earl of Leven in 1641, was a Field Marshal under Gustavus Adolphus. (view tartan)
Leslie Red Ancient
The Barony of Leslie in Aberdeenshire came into the possession of this family in the 12th century. Sir Andrew Leslie was created Earl of Rothes by King James II of Scotland. This Sir Andrew signed the letter of 1329 to the Pope asserting the Independence of Scotland. George, the 3rd Earl, was involved in the murder of Cardinal Beaton. John, 7th Earl, supported King Charles II, and after the Restoration was High Treasurer and Captain of the Scottish Life Guards. He was created Duke of Rothes in 1680. His grandson, John, succeeded him as Earl of Rothes. Sir Andrew Leslie, created Earl of Leven in 1641, was a Field Marshal under Gustavus Adolphus. (view tartan)
Leslie Red Modern
The Barony of Leslie in Aberdeenshire came into the possession of this family in the 12th century. Sir Andrew Leslie was created Earl of Rothes by King James II of Scotland. This Sir Andrew signed the letter of 1329 to the Pope asserting the Independence of Scotland. George, the 3rd Earl, was involved in the murder of Cardinal Beaton. John, 7th Earl, supported King Charles II, and after the Restoration was High Treasurer and Captain of the Scottish Life Guards. He was created Duke of Rothes in 1680. His grandson, John, succeeded him as Earl of Rothes. Sir Andrew Leslie, created Earl of Leven in 1641, was a Field Marshal under Gustavus Adolphus. (view tartan)
Lindsay Ancient
This family are of Norman descent and were found in the Border counties in the 12th century. Sir David Lindsay of Glenesk, who married a daughter of the Scottish king, was created Earl of Crawford in 1398. The 4th Earl, sometimes known as ldquo;Earl Beardie, plotted against the Crown and was soundly defeated by the Earl of Huntly in 1452 and deprived of his lands and titles. He was later pardoned. His son, the 5th Earl, was created Duke of Montrose in 1488, the first Dukedom conferred on a Scot who was not of the Royal family. On his death in 1495 the Dukedom ended. The Lindsays were known as ldquo;The Lightsome Lindsays. The seat of the Earl Crawford and Balcarres is at Balcarres in Fife. (view tartan)
Lindsay Modern
This family are of Norman descent and were found in the Border counties in the 12th century. Sir David Lindsay of Glenesk, who married a daughter of the Scottish king, was created Earl of Crawford in 1398. The 4th Earl, sometimes known as ldquo;Earl Beardie, plotted against the Crown and was soundly defeated by the Earl of Huntly in 1452 and deprived of his lands and titles. He was later pardoned. His son, the 5th Earl, was created Duke of Montrose in 1488, the first Dukedom conferred on a Scot who was not of the Royal family. On his death in 1495 the Dukedom ended. The Lindsays were known as ldquo;The Lightsome Lindsays. The seat of the Earl Crawford and Balcarres is at Balcarres in Fife. (view tartan)
Lindsay Weathered
This family are of Norman descent and were found in the Border counties in the 12th century. Sir David Lindsay of Glenesk, who married a daughter of the Scottish king, was created Earl of Crawford in 1398. The 4th Earl, sometimes known as ldquo;Earl Beardie, plotted against the Crown and was soundly defeated by the Earl of Huntly in 1452 and deprived of his lands and titles. He was later pardoned. His son, the 5th Earl, was created Duke of Montrose in 1488, the first Dukedom conferred on a Scot who was not of the Royal family. On his death in 1495 the Dukedom ended. The Lindsays were known as ldquo;The Lightsome Lindsays. The seat of the Earl Crawford and Balcarres is at Balcarres in Fife. (view tartan)
Livingston Ancient
The Livingstons were settled in West Lothian before the 12th century. Sir William Livingston received the lands of Callander from King David II, about 1347. From the Callander Livingstons descended many well-known branches. Mary Livingston, one of Mary, Queen of Scots ldquo;four Marys was the daughter of the 5th Lord of Livingston and her brother, the 6th Lord, fought for the Queen at the battle of Langside. The 7th Lord was created Earl of Linlithgow in 1600. For participating in the Jacobite Rising of 1715 the 4th earl was forfeited. The Highland Livingstons appear to have a different origin and are sometimes called Mac an-leigh (MacLeay), meaning the ldquo;son of the physician. (view tartan)
Livingston Modern
The Livingstons were settled in West Lothian before the 12th century. Sir William Livingston received the lands of Callander from King David II, about 1347. From the Callander Livingstons descended many well-known branches. Mary Livingston, one of Mary, Queen of Scots ldquo;four Marys was the daughter of the 5th Lord of Livingston and her brother, the 6th Lord, fought for the Queen at the battle of Langside. The 7th Lord was created Earl of Linlithgow in 1600. For participating in the Jacobite Rising of 1715 the 4th earl was forfeited. The Highland Livingstons appear to have a different origin and are sometimes called Mac an-leigh (MacLeay), meaning the ldquo;son of the physician. (view tartan)
Loch Lomond
(view tartan)
Lochaber Weathered
The origin of this tartan is uncertain and it is generally accepted as a district tartan. It is known to have existed as early as 1797. One of the original specimens of this tartan can be found in the West Highland Museum in Fort William. (view tartan)
Lochcarron Hunting Ancient
Our company started weaving tartan at North Strome, Lochcarron, in the late 1940s, and since that time we have woven tartans at Lochcarron for Clans and families wherever Scots people settled throughout the world. It should have come as no surprise to us when it was pointed out that the residents of Lochcarron District had expressed a desire to have a tartan created to recognise the area and its association with tartan manufacture. The Lochcarron tartan was duly created with three colourings quot;modernquot;, quot;ancientquot; and quot;weatheredquot; of the hunting (green) version, and of the dress (red). As Lochcarron is located in what was quot;Ross and Cromartyquot; we chose to adapt the hunting Ross tartan adding blue to indicate the strong influence of the sea to the life of the area. All versions of Lochcarron were introduced in 1982. (view tartan)
Lochcarron Hunting Modern
Our company started weaving tartan at North Strome, Lochcarron, in the late 1940s, and since that time we have woven tartans at Lochcarron for Clans and families wherever Scots people settled throughout the world. It should have come as no surprise to us when it was pointed out that the residents of Lochcarron District had expressed a desire to have a tartan created to recognise the area and its association with tartan manufacture. The Lochcarron tartan was duly created with three colourings quot;modernquot;, quot;ancientquot; and quot;weatheredquot; of the hunting (green) version, and of the dress (red). As Lochcarron is located in what was quot;Ross and Cromartyquot; we chose to adapt the hunting Ross tartan adding blue to indicate the strong influence of the sea to the life of the area. All versions of Lochcarron were introduced in 1982. (view tartan)
Lochcarron Hunting Weathered
Our company started weaving tartan at North Strome, Lochcarron, in the late 1940s, and since that time we have woven tartans at Lochcarron for Clans and families wherever Scots people settled throughout the world. It should have come as no surprise to us when it was pointed out that the residents of Lochcarron District had expressed a desire to have a tartan created to recognise the area and its association with tartan manufacture. The Lochcarron tartan was duly created with three colourings quot;modernquot;, quot;ancientquot; and quot;weatheredquot; of the hunting (green) version, and of the dress (red). As Lochcarron is located in what was quot;Ross and Cromartyquot; we chose to adapt the hunting Ross tartan adding blue to indicate the strong influence of the sea to the life of the area. All versions of Lochcarron were introduced in 1982. (view tartan)
Logan Ancient
There are two distinct branches of this family, one Highland and the other Lowland. In the Lowlands, Restalrig, near Edinburgh, was the chief possession of the family, and Sir Robert of Restalrig married a daughter of King Robert II. He was appointed Admiral of Scotland in 1400. The Highland family are said to have as their ancestor Gilligorm, who was killed at the Battle of Drumderfit, in the Black Isle, Ross-shire. His son was educated at Beauly Priory and after taking Holy Orders went to Skye. He married and his family became known as MacLennans. The name is common in many parts of the Highlands. (view tartan)
Logan Modern
There are two distinct branches of this family, one Highland and the other Lowland. In the Lowlands, Restalrig, near Edinburgh, was the chief possession of the family, and Sir Robert of Restalrig married a daughter of King Robert II. He was appointed Admiral of Scotland in 1400. The Highland family are said to have as their ancestor Gilligorm, who was killed at the Battle of Drumderfit, in the Black Isle, Ross-shire. His son was educated at Beauly Priory and after taking Holy Orders went to Skye. He married and his family became known as MacLennans. The name is common in many parts of the Highlands. (view tartan)
Logan Weathered
There are two distinct branches of this family, one Highland and the other Lowland. In the Lowlands, Restalrig, near Edinburgh, was the chief possession of the family, and Sir Robert of Restalrig married a daughter of King Robert II. He was appointed Admiral of Scotland in 1400. The Highland family are said to have as their ancestor Gilligorm, who was killed at the Battle of Drumderfit, in the Black Isle, Ross-shire. His son was educated at Beauly Priory and after taking Holy Orders went to Skye. He married and his family became known as MacLennans. The name is common in many parts of the Highlands. (view tartan)
Lumsden Ancient
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MacAlister Ancient
The MacAlisters are a branch of Clan Donald. Their ancestor was Alister, descendant of the famous Somerled of the Isles. They were in Kintyre in the 14th century and later were numerous in Bute and Arran. In 1481 Charles MacAlister was Steward of Kintyre. His son, John, was called ldquo;John of the Loup, and his descendants are the principal family. Another branch, that of Tarbet, appears first in the 16th century, and became Constables of Tarbet Castle. The seat of the chief, MacAlister of the Loup and Kennox, is in Kennox, Ayrshire. (view tartan)
MacAlister Modern
The MacAlisters are a branch of Clan Donald. Their ancestor was Alister, descendant of the famous Somerled of the Isles. They were in Kintyre in the 14th century and later were numerous in Bute and Arran. In 1481 Charles MacAlister was Steward of Kintyre. His son, John, was called ldquo;John of the Loup, and his descendants are the principal family. Another branch, that of Tarbet, appears first in the 16th century, and became Constables of Tarbet Castle. The seat of the chief, MacAlister of the Loup and Kennox, is in Kennox, Ayrshire. (view tartan)
MacAlpine Ancient
The Clan Alpine, usually called quot;Siol Ailpeinquot;, was the name given to a number of clans claiming Royal descent. These included the MacGregors, MacNabs, Grants and MacQuarries. King Alpine, who was murdered after defeating the Picts in 834, is claimed as the ancestor of the MacAlpine clans. Be this as it may, the name Alpine is an ancient one in Scottish history. The history of the clan is obscure, but the name is recorded in 1260 in Perthshire. In 1405, a Mordac MacKalpy was given permission by the King of England to attend the schools of Oxford and Cambridge. Early Gaelic poems refer to St Patrick as Padruig MacAlpain. (view tartan)
MacAlpine Modern
The Clan Alpine, usually called quot;Siol Ailpeinquot;, was the name given to a number of clans claiming Royal descent. These included the MacGregors, MacNabs, Grants and MacQuarries. King Alpine, who was murdered after defeating the Picts in 834, is claimed as the ancestor of the MacAlpine clans. Be this as it may, the name Alpine is an ancient one in Scottish history. The history of the clan is obscure, but the name is recorded in 1260 in Perthshire. In 1405, a Mordac MacKalpy was given permission by the King of England to attend the schools of Oxford and Cambridge. Early Gaelic poems refer to St Patrick as Padruig MacAlpain. (view tartan)
MacArthur Ancient
A Gaelic proverb has it that ldquo;there is nothing older than the Hills, MacArthur and the Devil. Undoubtedly the MacArthurs formed the senior branch of Clan Campbell, from the days of Robert II, when the King conferred the lands of Strachur on Arthur Campbell from whom the Clan derives its name, to the days of James I, when their chief, John, was executed and their power began to wane. The MacArthurs supported Bruce and were rewarded by lands which had formerly belonged to the MacDougalls. The chief-ship is doubtful, but may reside today in the MacArthurs of Islay. John MacArthur of Strachur who went to Australia at the end of the 18th century with his regiment, built up the colony of New South Wales, virtually laying the foundations of the two great industries of wool and wine. (view tartan)
MacArthur Modern
A Gaelic proverb has it that ldquo;there is nothing older than the Hills, MacArthur and the Devil. Undoubtedly the MacArthurs formed the senior branch of Clan Campbell, from the days of Robert II, when the King conferred the lands of Strachur on Arthur Campbell from whom the Clan derives its name, to the days of James I, when their chief, John, was executed and their power began to wane. The MacArthurs supported Bruce and were rewarded by lands which had formerly belonged to the MacDougalls. The chief-ship is doubtful, but may reside today in the MacArthurs of Islay. John MacArthur of Strachur who went to Australia at the end of the 18th century with his regiment, built up the colony of New South Wales, virtually laying the foundations of the two great industries of wool and wine. (view tartan)
MacAuley Hunting Ancient
There appears to be two MacAulay families, one settled about the 13th century at Ardincaple and the other in the Island of Lewis. The Ardincaple MacAulays were a branch of Clan Alpine, and in 1591 were associated with the MacGregors as septs. Their lands were sold to the Duke of Argyll in 1787. The MacAulays of Lewis followed the MacLeods of Lewis and claim to be descended from Aula or quot;Olave the Blackquot; who, in the 13th century, was King of Man and the Isles. MacAulays on the Highland mainland associated with Clan MacKenzie. (view tartan)
MacAuley Hunting Modern
There appears to be two MacAulay families, one settled about the 13th century at Ardincaple and the other in the Island of Lewis. The Ardincaple MacAulays were a branch of Clan Alpine, and in 1591 were associated with the MacGregors as septs. Their lands were sold to the Duke of Argyll in 1787. The MacAulays of Lewis followed the MacLeods of Lewis and claim to be descended from Aula or quot;Olave the Blackquot; who, in the 13th century, was King of Man and the Isles. MacAulays on the Highland mainland associated with Clan MacKenzie. (view tartan)
MacAuley Red Modern
There appears to be two MacAulay families, one settled about the 13th century at Ardincaple and the other in the Island of Lewis. The Ardincaple MacAulays were a branch of Clan Alpine, and in 1591 were associated with the MacGregors as septs. Their lands were sold to the Duke of Argyll in 1787. The MacAulays of Lewis followed the MacLeods of Lewis and claim to be descended from Aula or quot;Olave the Blackquot; who, in the 13th century, was King of Man and the Isles. MacAulays on the Highland mainland associated with Clan MacKenzie. (view tartan)
MacBean Ancient
This clan was a sept of Clan Chattan and their home near Inverness. The MacBeans were at the Battle of Harlaw in 1411 and the clan historian claims they suffered more losses than any other branch of Clan Chattan. Of the branches of this clan, that of Kinchyle became very prominent. The heroism of Gillies MacBean at the Battle of Culloden on 16th April 1746, is well known. Single-handed he killed 13 Hanoverians before he was overcome and killed. The MacBeans were noted for their valour and Major-General William MacBean, who enlisted aas a private in the 93rd Regiment, won the V.C during the Indian Mutiny. (view tartan)
MacBean Modern
This clan was a sept of Clan Chattan and their home near Inverness. The MacBeans were at the Battle of Harlaw in 1411 and the clan historian claims they suffered more losses than any other branch of Clan Chattan. Of the branches of this clan, that of Kinchyle became very prominent. The heroism of Gillies MacBean at the Battle of Culloden on 16th April 1746, is well known. Single-handed he killed 13 Hanoverians before he was overcome and killed. The MacBeans were noted for their valour and Major-General William MacBean, who enlisted as a private in the 93rd Regiment, won the V.C during the Indian Mutiny. (view tartan)
MacBeth Ancient
This name is said to mean ldquo;son of Life and is derived from the Gaelic MacBheathain. In the 16th and 17th centuries two families of the name practised medicine in the Highlands, and it is claimed their name was later changed to Beaton. MacBeth, King of Scotland, came to the throne in 1040 and ruled for 16 years. Shakespeare in his play ldquo;MacBeth, attributes the murder of King Duncan to MacBeth and his Queen. MacBeth was killed at Lumphanan in 1056 and his body was taken to Iona for burial. (view tartan)
MacBeth Modern
This name is said to mean ldquo;son of Life and is derived from the Gaelic MacBheathain. In the 16th and 17th centuries two families of the name practised medicine in the Highlands, and it is claimed their name was later changed to Beaton. MacBeth, King of Scotland, came to the throne in 1040 and ruled for 16 years. Shakespeare in his play ldquo;MacBeth, attributes the murder of King Duncan to MacBeth and his Queen. MacBeth was killed at Lumphanan in 1056 and his body was taken to Iona for burial. (view tartan)
MacCallum Ancient
Argyllshire is the home of this clan and the name Malcolm is the English equivalent of the Gaelic Callum. The lands of Craignish were given to Reginald MacCallum of Corbarron in 1414, together with the Constableship of the Castles of Lochaffy and Craignish. In the 17th century Corbarron was bequeathed to Zachary MacCallum of Poltalloch. The Poltalloch family possessed their lands prior to 1562. Dugald MacCallum of Poltalloch, who succeeded to the estate in 1779, is said to have been the first to adopt the name Malcolm. (view tartan)
MacCallum Modern
Argyllshire is the home of this clan and the name Malcolm is the English equivalent of the Gaelic Callum. The lands of Craignish were given to Reginald MacCallum of Corbarron in 1414, together with the Constableship of the Castles of Lochaffy and Craignish. In the 17th century Corbarron was bequeathed to Zachary MacCallum of Poltalloch. The Poltalloch family possessed their lands prior to 1562. Dugald MacCallum of Poltalloch, who succeeded to the estate in 1779, is said to have been the first to adopt the name Malcolm. (view tartan)
MacCallum Red Line Ancient
Argyllshire is the home of this clan and the name Malcolm is the English equivalent of the Gaelic Callum. The lands of Craignish were given to Reginald MacCallum of Corbarron in 1414, together with the Constableship of the Castles of Lochaffy and Craignish. In the 17th century Corbarron was bequeathed to Zachary MacCallum of Poltalloch. The Poltalloch family possessed their lands prior to 1562. Dugald MacCallum of Poltalloch, who succeeded to the estate in 1779, is said to have been the first to adopt the name Malcolm. (view tartan)
MacColl Ancient
The MacColls are said to be a sept of Clan Donald, but tradition claims they settled near Loch Fyne, in Campbell territory, and allied themselves to the Clan Campbell. They are, however, found associated with other clans and they engaged in a feud with the MacGregors. In 1602 they raided Ross, but at Drum Nachder they met the MacPhersons, with whom they were on ill terms. A battle took place and the MacColls were severely defeated and their leader killed. (view tartan)
MacColl Modern
The MacColls are said to be a sept of Clan Donald, but tradition claims they settled near Loch Fyne, in Campbell territory, and allied themselves to the Clan Campbell. They are, however, found associated with other clans and they engaged in a feud with the MacGregors. In 1602 they raided Ross, but at Drum Nachder they met the MacPhersons, with whom they were on ill terms. A battle took place and the MacColls were severely defeated and their leader killed. (view tartan)
MacCorqoudale Ancient
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MacDairmid Ancient
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MacDiarmid Modern
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MacDonald (or MacDonnell) Of Keppoch Ancient
Alastair Carrach, grandson of the 1st Lord of the Isles, was the founder of the Keppoch branch of the great Clan Donald. In 1431 part of Keppoch's lands were forfeited and given to the Mackintoshes and this caused a feud between the two clans. They appear to have been extremely warlike and the 9th chief, who was exiled for most of his life, served in the Swedish army. The 12th chief and his brother were murdered in 1663. Coll, the 15th chief, called quot;Coll of the Cowsquot;, was noted for his fierceness. He resisted Mackintosh attempts to take his lands, which he retained by power of the sword. His son Alexander, who succeeded him, died at the Battle of Culloden fighting for the Jacobites. Badge - Heath. (view tartan)
MacDonald Clan Ancient
Descended from Donald, grandson of Somerled of the Isles, this is the oldest, and most famous, of all Scottish clans. The Lords of the Isles held sway over large territories and ruled as independent princes. They supported Bruce in his struggle for Independence, but their claim to the Earldom of Ross brought them into conflict with the Crown. After the Battle of Harlaw, in 1411, Alexander MacDonald was acknowledged Earl of Ross, but the title was forfeited in 1494. Many branches exist of this once all-powerful clan and with it, also, was associated numerous septs or ldquo;broken clans who took protection from them. The MacDonalds supported the Royal Stuarts, and their prowess in battle and in clan feuds made them feared and respected. (view tartan)
MacDonald Clan Modern
Descended from Donald, grandson of Somerled of the Isles, this is the oldest, and most famous, of all Scottish clans. The Lords of the Isles held sway over large territories and ruled as independent princes. They supported Bruce in his struggle for Independence, but their claim to the Earldom of Ross brought them into conflict with the Crown. After the Battle of Harlaw, in 1411, Alexander MacDonald was acknowledged Earl of Ross, but the title was forfeited in 1494. Many branches exist of this once all-powerful clan and with it, also, was associated numerous septs or ldquo;broken clans who took protection from them. The MacDonalds supported the Royal Stuarts, and their prowess in battle and in clan feuds made them feared and respected. (view tartan)
MacDonald Clan Weathered
Descended from Donald, grandson of Somerled of the Isles, this is the oldest, and most famous, of all Scottish clans. The Lords of the Isles held sway over large territories and ruled as independent princes. They supported Bruce in his struggle for Independence, but their claim to the Earldom of Ross brought them into conflict with the Crown. After the Battle of Harlaw, in 1411, Alexander MacDonald was acknowledged Earl of Ross, but the title was forfeited in 1494. Many branches exist of this once all-powerful clan and with it, also, was associated numerous septs or ldquo;broken clans who took protection from them. The MacDonalds supported the Royal Stuarts, and their prowess in battle and in clan feuds made them feared and respected. (view tartan)
MacDonald Dress Ancient
Descended from Donald, grandson of Somerled of the Isles, this is the oldest, and most famous, of all Scottish clans. The Lords of the Isles held sway over large territories and ruled as independent princes. They supported Bruce in his struggle for Independence, but their claim to the Earldom of Ross brought them into conflict with the Crown. After the Battle of Harlaw, in 1411, Alexander MacDonald was acknowledged Earl of Ross, but the title was forfeited in 1494. Many branches exist of this once all-powerful clan and with it, also, was associated numerous septs or ldquo;broken clans who took protection from them. The MacDonalds supported the Royal Stuarts, and their prowess in battle and in clan feuds made them feared and respected. (view tartan)
MacDonald Dress Modern
Descended from Donald, grandson of Somerled of the Isles, this is the oldest, and most famous, of all Scottish clans. The Lords of the Isles held sway over large territories and ruled as independent princes. They supported Bruce in his struggle for Independence, but their claim to the Earldom of Ross brought them into conflict with the Crown. After the Battle of Harlaw, in 1411, Alexander MacDonald was acknowledged Earl of Ross, but the title was forfeited in 1494. Many branches exist of this once all-powerful clan and with it, also, was associated numerous septs or ldquo;broken clans who took protection from them. The MacDonalds supported the Royal Stuarts, and their prowess in battle and in clan feuds made them feared and respected. (view tartan)
Macdonald Dress Weathered
Descended from Donald, grandson of Somerled of the Isles, this is the oldest, and most famous, of all Scottish clans. The Lords of the Isles held sway over large territories and ruled as independent princes. They supported Bruce in his struggle for Independence, but their claim to the Earldom of Ross brought them into conflict with the Crown. After the Battle of Harlaw, in 1411, Alexander MacDonald was acknowledged Earl of Ross, but the title was forfeited in 1494. Many branches exist of this once all-powerful clan and with it, also, was associated numerous septs or ldquo;broken clans who took protection from them. The MacDonalds supported the Royal Stuarts, and their prowess in battle and in clan feuds made them feared and respected. (view tartan)
MacDonald Lord of the Isles Ancient
MacDonald of the Isles Somerled of the Isles, founder of the Clan Donald, expelled the Norsemen from the Western Isles in the 12th century. He was killed in 1164 when engaged in battle against King Malcolm IV. John, son of Angus Og, who supported Robert the Bruce, took the title of ldquo;Lord of the Isles in 1354. The 2nd Lord claimed the Earldom of Ross and fought in support of his claim at Harlaw in 1411. His son became Earl of Ross and the title was acknowledged in 1430. The last Lord of the Isles became a Peer in 1476, but came into conflict with the king and, in 1494, the Lordship of the Isles was annexed to the crown. (view tartan)
MacDonald of Ardnamurchan Ancient
The founder of this Clan was quot;John the Boldquot; (Iain Sprangach). He was the third son of Angus Mor of Islay. John was sent, in 1270, to clear the Norwegian settlers from Ardnamurchan: Norway having ceded its rights in 1266 to the Western Isles. In 1309 Robert the First, by Royal Charter, granted Ardnamurchan and Sunart to Angus Ogg, who thereupon ceded them to his brother John. The descendants of quot;John the Boldquot; held these territories for as much as 340 years and during this time exerted considerable influence in the Western Isles. The clansmen gradually dispersed to all parts of the world: the direct descendant moving to Morayshire. This part of the family became known as the MacKains of Elgin. (view tartan)
MacDonald of Ardnamurchan Modern
The founder of this Clan was quot;John the Boldquot; (Iain Sprangach). He was the third son of Angus Mor of Islay. John was sent, in 1270, to clear the Norwegian settlers from Ardnamurchan: Norway having ceded its rights in 1266 to the Western Isles. In 1309 Robert the First, by Royal Charter, granted Ardnamurchan and Sunart to Angus Ogg, who thereupon ceded them to his brother John. The descendants of quot;John the Boldquot; held these territories for as much as 340 years and during this time exerted considerable influence in the Western Isles. The clansmen gradually dispersed to all parts of the world: the direct descendant moving to Morayshire. This part of the family became known as the MacKains of Elgin. (view tartan)
MacDonald of Clanranald Ancient
Ranald, son of the Lord of the Isles, was the progenitor of this famous branch of the Clan Donald. They had the reputation of being fierce and warlike and their history is a turbulent one. They frequently engaged in clan feuds and at the Battle of Blar-na-leine in 1544 defeated the Clan Fraser. They followed Montrose in his campaign in the 17th century and they participated in the Jacobite Risings of 1715 and 1745. When Prince Charlie raised his standard at Glenfinnan in September 1745 he did so in Clanranald territory. Castle Tirim was the ancient fortress of the Clanranalds. . (view tartan)
MacDonald of Clanranald Modern
Ranald, son of the Lord of the Isles, was the progenitor of this famous branch of the Clan Donald. They had the reputation of being fierce and warlike and their history is a turbulent one. They frequently engaged in clan feuds and at the Battle of Blar-na-leine in 1544 defeated the Clan Fraser. They followed Montrose in his campaign in the 17th century and they participated in the Jacobite Risings of 1715 and 1745. When Prince Charlie raised his standard at Glenfinnan in September 1745 he did so in Clanranald territory. Castle Tirim was the ancient fortress of the Clanranalds. . (view tartan)
MacDonald of Clanranald Weathered
Ranald, son of the Lord of the Isles, was the progenitor of this famous branch of the Clan Donald. They had the reputation of being fierce and warlike and their history is a turbulent one. They frequently engaged in clan feuds and at the Battle of Blar-na-leine in 1544 defeated the Clan Fraser. They followed Montrose in his campaign in the 17th century and they participated in the Jacobite Risings of 1715 and 1745. When Prince Charlie raised his standard at Glenfinnan in September 1745 he did so in Clanranald territory. Castle Tirim was the ancient fortress of the Clanranalds. (view tartan)
MacDonald of Glengarry Ancient
MacDonald (now MacDonell) of Glengarry shares the same origin as MacDonald of Clanranald, being sprung from Ranald, son of John, 1st Lord of the Isles. In 1427, the lands of Glengarry reverted to the Crown, after which the MacDonalds occupied them as Crown tenants. During the 16th and 17th centuries, these MacDonalds and the MacKenzies were in almost constant feud. The 9th Chief fought with Montrose, was forfeited, but created Lord MacDonell of Aros at the Restoration. The 11th Chief fought at Killiecrankie and at Sheriffmuir, and the Clan produced a regiment of 600 men to fight for Prince Charles Edward. Alasdair Ronaldson MacDonell was the last typical Highland chief, living in feudal state. A friend of Sir Walter Scott, at his death the heavily mortgaged estates had to be sold. Badge ETH; Purple Heather. (view tartan)
MacDonald of Glengarry Modern
MacDonald (now MacDonell) of Glengarry shares the same origin as MacDonald of Clanranald, being sprung from Ranald, son of John, 1st Lord of the Isles. In 1427, the lands of Glengarry reverted to the Crown, after which the MacDonalds occupied them as Crown tenants. During the 16th and 17th centuries, these MacDonalds and the MacKenzies were in almost constant feud. The 9th Chief fought with Montrose, was forfeited, but created Lord MacDonell of Aros at the Restoration. The 11th Chief fought at Killiecrankie and at Sheriffmuir, and the Clan produced a regiment of 600 men to fight for Prince Charles Edward. Alasdair Ronaldson MacDonell was the last typical Highland chief, living in feudal state. A friend of Sir Walter Scott, at his death the heavily mortgaged estates had to be sold. Badge ETH; Purple Heather. (view tartan)
MacDonald of Keppoch Modern
Alastair Carrach, grandson of the 1st Lord of the Isles, was the founder of the Keppoch branch of the great Clan Donald. In 1431 part of Keppochs lands were forfeited and given to the Mackintoshes and this caused a feud between the two clans. They appear to have been extremely warlike and the 9th chief, who was exiled for most of his life, served in the Swedish army. The 12th chief and his brother were murdered in 1663. Coll, the 15th chief, called "Coll of the Cows", was noted for his fierceness. He resisted Mackintosh attempts to take his lands, which he retained by power of the sword. His son Alexander, who succeeded him, died at the Battle of Culloden fighting for the Jacobites. Badge - Heath. (view tartan)
MacDonald of Kingsburgh
James MacDonald of Kingsburgh, founder of this family, descended from 4th Baron of Sleate. He was killed at Eilean Donan Castle by the MacKenzies in 1539. Donald, 3rd of Kingsburgh, was turbulent and warlike and carried on a feud against Clan MacLeod. He is claimed to be the first to drive Highland cattle from the Western Islands to the mainland and cattle markets of South Scotland. The sixth chief entertained Prince Charlie in 1746 and assisted him to escape. Flora MacDonald, the Jacobite heroine, married Allan MacDonald of Kingsburgh. Badge - Heath. (view tartan)
MacDonald of Sleat Ancient
Descended from Donald, grandson of Somerled of the Isles, this is the oldest, and most famous, of all Scottish clans. The Lords of the Isles held sway over large territories and ruled as independent princes. They supported Bruce in his struggle for Independence, but their claim to the Earldom of Ross brought them into conflict with the Crown. After the Battle of Harlaw, in 1411, Alexander MacDonald was acknowledged Earl of Ross, but the title was forfeited in 1494. Many branches exist of this once all-powerful clan and with it, also, was associated numerous septs or ldquo;broken clans who took protection from them. The MacDonalds supported the Royal Stuarts, and their prowess in battle and in clan feuds made them feared and respected. (view tartan)
MacDonald of Sleat Modern
Descended from Donald, grandson of Somerled of the Isles, this is the oldest, and most famous, of all Scottish clans. The Lords of the Isles held sway over large territories and ruled as independent princes. They supported Bruce in his struggle for Independence, but their claim to the Earldom of Ross brought them into conflict with the Crown. After the Battle of Harlaw, in 1411, Alexander MacDonald was acknowledged Earl of Ross, but the title was forfeited in 1494. Many branches exist of this once all-powerful clan and with it, also, was associated numerous septs or ldquo;broken clans who took protection from them. The MacDonalds supported the Royal Stuarts, and their prowess in battle and in clan feuds made them feared and respected. (view tartan)
MacDonald of the Isles Hunting Ancient
Descended from Donald, grandson of Somerled of the Isles, this is the oldest, and most famous, of all Scottish clans. The Lords of the Isles held sway over large territories and ruled as independent princes. They supported Bruce in his struggle for Independence, but their claim to the Earldom of Ross brought them into conflict with the Crown. After the Battle of Harlaw, in 1411, Alexander MacDonald was acknowledged Earl of Ross, but the title was forfeited in 1494. Many branches exist of this once all-powerful clan and with it, also, was associated numerous septs or ldquo;broken clans who took protection from them. The MacDonalds supported the Royal Stuarts, and their prowess in battle and in clan feuds made them feared and respected. (view tartan)
MacDonald of the Isles Hunting Modern
Somerled of the Isles, founder of Clan Donald, expelled the Norsemen from the Western Isles in the 12th century. He was killed in 1164 when engaged battle against King Malcolm IV. John, son of Angus Og, who supported Robert the Bruce, took the title of quot;Lord of Islesquot; in 1354. The 2nd Lord claimed Earldom of Ross and fought in support of his claim at Harlow, in 1411. His son became Earl of Ross and the title was acknowledged in 1430. The last Lord the Isles became a Peer in 1478, but came into conflict with the king and, in 1494, the Lordship of the isles was annexed to the crown. Badge-Meath. (view tartan)
MacDonald of the Isles Hunting Weathered
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MacDonald of the Isles Red Ancient
Somerled of the Isles, founder of Clan Donald, expelled the Norsemen from the Western Isles in the 12th century. He was killed in 1164 when engaged battle against King Malcolm IV. John, son of Angus Og, who supported Robert the Bruce, took the title of quot;Lord of Islesquot; in 1354. The 2nd Lord claimed Earldom of Ross and fought in support of his claim at Harlow, in 1411. His son became Earl of Ross and the title was acknowledged in 1430. The last Lord the Isles became a Peer in 1478, but came into conflict with the king and, in 1494, the Lordship of the isles was annexed to the crown. Badge-Meath. (view tartan)
MacDonald of the Isles Red Modern
Somerled of the Isles, founder of Clan Donald, expelled the Norsemen from the Western Isles in the 12th century. He was killed in 1164 when engaged battle against King Malcolm IV. John, son of Angus Og, who supported Robert the Bruce, took the title of quot;Lord of Islesquot; in 1354. The 2nd Lord claimed Earldom of Ross and fought in support of his claim at Harlow, in 1411. His son became Earl of Ross and the title was acknowledged in 1430. The last Lord the Isles became a Peer in 1478, but came into conflict with the king and, in 1494, the Lordship of the isles was annexed to the crown. Badge-Meath. (view tartan)
MacDougall Ancient
Lorn is the home of this Celtic clan who descended from Dugall, eldest son of Somerled of the Isles. Known as the Lords of Lorn, they opposed Robert the Bruce. In battle with the clan, King Robert escaped death, but left behind his brooch. This, the Brooch of Lorn, is now one of the clan's most treasured possessions. The MacDougall chief was later captured. His son, John, fled to England and was appointed Admiral of the English fleet. The clan lands had been forfeited, but later came into Stewart possession. In 1457 John MacDougall acquired Dunolly and became chief of the clan. The chief's eldest daughter is called quot;the Maid of Lornquot;. (view tartan)
MacDougall Modern
Lorn is the home of this Celtic clan who descended from Dugall, eldest son of Somerled of the Isles. Known as the Lords of Lorn, they opposed Robert the Bruce. In battle with the clan, King Robert escaped death, but left behind his brooch. This, the Brooch of Lorn, is now one of the clan's most treasured possessions. The MacDougall chief was later captured. His son, John, fled to England and was appointed Admiral of the English fleet. The clan lands had been forfeited, but later came into Stewart possession. In 1457 John MacDougall acquired Dunolly and became chief of the clan. The chief's eldest daughter is called quot;the Maid of Lornquot;. (view tartan)
MacDuff Ancient
This surname is one of the oldest in Scotland and the clan is said to have descended from the Celtic Earls of Fife. The genealogies of Kings Lulach and MacBeth are headed quot;Genealogies of the Clan Duffquot;. In an Act of 1384 mention is made of the quot;Law Clan Duffquot;, whereby they were given certain privileges. The direct line of the Celtic Earls terminated in 1353. The Duffs of Dipple, in Banffshire, were an important branch. Lord Braco was created Viscount MacDuff and Earl of Fife in 1827. Alexander, Earl of Fife, was created Duke of Fife on his marriage, in 1889, to H.R.H. Princess Louise, daughter of King Edward VII. (view tartan)
MacDuff Dress Modern
This surname is one of the oldest in Scotland and the clan is said to have descended from the Celtic Earls of Fife. The genealogies of Kings Lulach and MacBeth are headed quot;Genealogies of the Clan Duffquot;. In an Act of 1384 mention is made of the quot;Law Clan Duffquot;, whereby they were given certain privileges. The direct line of the Celtic Earls terminated in 1353. The Duffs of Dipple, in Banffshire, were an important branch. Lord Braco was created Viscount MacDuff and Earl of Fife in 1827. Alexander, Earl of Fife, was created Duke of Fife on his marriage, in 1889, to H.R.H. Princess Louise, daughter of King Edward VII. (view tartan)
MacDuff Hunting Ancient
This surname is one of the oldest in Scotland and the clan is said to have descended from the Celtic Earls of Fife. The genealogies of Kings Lulach and MacBeth are headed quot;Genealogies of the Clan Duffquot;. In an Act of 1384 mention is made of the quot;Law Clan Duffquot;, whereby they were given certain privileges. The direct line of the Celtic Earls terminated in 1353. The Duffs of Dipple, in Banffshire, were an important branch. Lord Braco was created Viscount MacDuff and Earl of Fife in 1827. Alexander, Earl of Fife, was created Duke of Fife on his marriage, in 1889, to H.R.H. Princess Louise, daughter of King Edward VII. (view tartan)
Macduff Hunting Modern
This surname is one of the oldest in Scotland and the clan is said to have descended from the Celtic Earls of Fife. The genealogies of Kings Lulach and MacBeth are headed quot;Genealogies of the Clan Duffquot;. In an Act of 1384 mention is made of the quot;Law Clan Duffquot;, whereby they were given certain privileges. The direct line of the Celtic Earls terminated in 1353. The Duffs of Dipple, in Banffshire, were an important branch. Lord Braco was created Viscount MacDuff and Earl of Fife in 1827. Alexander, Earl of Fife, was created Duke of Fife on his marriage, in 1889, to H.R.H. Princess Louise, daughter of King Edward VII. (view tartan)
MacDuff Modern
This surname is one of the oldest in Scotland and the clan is said to have descended from the Celtic Earls of Fife. The genealogies of Kings Lulach and MacBeth are headed quot;Genealogies of the Clan Duffquot;. In an Act of 1384 mention is made of the quot;Law Clan Duffquot;, whereby they were given certain privileges. The direct line of the Celtic Earls terminated in 1353. The Duffs of Dipple, in Banffshire, were an important branch. Lord Braco was created Viscount MacDuff and Earl of Fife in 1827. Alexander, Earl of Fife, was created Duke of Fife on his marriage, in 1889, to H.R.H. Princess Louise, daughter of King Edward VII. (view tartan)
MacEwan Ancient
This clan was anciently known as the MacEwans of Otter, and a building known as MacEwen's Castle stood near Kilfinan on the shore of Loch Fyne. They were allied to the MacLachlans and the MacNeils, and in the 12th century owned part of Cowal. Ewen of Otter, from whom the clan takes its name, lived in the 13th century. About 1432 the Campbells acquired Otter and thereafter the power of the MacEwens declined. The name was later found in other parts of Scotland. The MacEwens were hereditary bards to the Clan Campbell. (view tartan)
MacEwan Modern
This clan was anciently known as the MacEwans of Otter, and a building known as MacEwen's Castle stood near Kilfinan on the shore of Loch Fyne. They were allied to the MacLachlans and the MacNeils, and in the 12th century owned part of Cowal. Ewen of Otter, from whom the clan takes its name, lived in the 13th century. In about 1432 the Campbells acquired Otter and thereafter the power of the MacEwens declined. The name was later found in other parts of Scotland. The MacEwens were hereditary bards to the Clan Campbell. (view tartan)
MacFadyen Modern
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MacFarlane Black and White
Gilchrist, a descendant of the Celtic Earls of Lennox, was the ancestor of this clan. Their territory was on Loch Lomondside, and they possessed Arrochar in 1230. Their 4th Chief was named Bartholomew, or Parlan in Gaelic; the clan name MacFarlane means quot;son of Bartholomewquot;. They were strong and warlike and distinguished themselves in battle. They claim to have captured three standards at the Battle of Langside. Like the MacGregors, they were proscribed for a time during the 17th century, and deprived of their name and lands. (view tartan)
MacFarlane Clan Ancient
Gilchrist, a descendant of the Celtic Earls of Lennox, was the ancestor of this clan. Their territory was on Loch Lomondside, and they possessed Arrochar in 1230. Their 4th Chief was named Bartholomew, or Parlan in Gaelic; the clan name MacFarlane means quot;son of Bartholomewquot;. They were strong and warlike and distinguished themselves in battle. They claim to have captured three standards at the Battle of Langside. Like the MacGregors, they were proscribed for a time during the 17th century, and deprived of their name and lands. (view tartan)
MacFarlane Clan Modern
Gilchrist, a descendant of the Celtic Earls of Lennox, was the ancestor of this clan. Their territory was on Loch Lomondside, and they possessed Arrochar in 1230. Their 4th Chief was named Bartholomew, or Parlan in Gaelic; the clan name MacFarlane means quot;son of Bartholomewquot;. They were strong and warlike and distinguished themselves in battle. They claim to have captured three standards at the Battle of Langside. Like the MacGregors, they were proscribed for a time during the 17th century, and deprived of their name and lands. (view tartan)
MacFarlane Clan Weathered
Gilchrist, a descendant of the Celtic Earls of Lennox, was the ancestor of this clan. Their territory was on Loch Lomondside, and they possessed Arrochar in 1230. Their 4th Chief was named Bartholomew, or Parlan in Gaelic; the clan name MacFarlane means quot;son of Bartholomewquot;. They were strong and warlike and distinguished themselves in battle. They claim to have captured three standards at the Battle of Langside. Like the MacGregors, they were proscribed for a time during the 17th century, and deprived of their name and lands. (view tartan)
MacFarlane Hunting Modern Heavy Weight Tartan
Gilchrist, a descendant of the Celtic Earls of Lennox, was the ancestor of this clan. Their territory was on Loch Lomondside, and they possessed Arrochar in 1230. Their 4th Chief was named Bartholomew, or Parlan in Gaelic; the clan name MacFarlane means quot;son of Bartholomewquot;. They were strong and warlike and distinguished themselves in battle. They claim to have captured three standards at the Battle of Langside. Like the MacGregors, they were proscribed for a time during the 17th century, and deprived of their name and lands. (view tartan)
MacGill Ancient
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MacGill Modern
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MacGillivray Ancient
This is one of the oldest branches of the great Confederation of Clan Chattan. One tradition brings them from Lochaber and Morven and tells how, driven out of their earlier home during the reign of Alexander II, they put themselves under the prosecution of Farquahard Mackintosh, 5th of Mackintosh. Another tradition brings them from Mull, where the name has always been usual, and takes a family of them north to Dunmaglass, in Strathnairn, before we have any written record. In 1609, when the Clan Chattan Bond of Union was signed, three MacGillivray chieftains put their names to it. The Clan was out in 1715. In 1745 the Chief, Red Alasdair of the Cattle, led his men and died himself at Culloden beside a spring still called MacGillivrays Well. The clansmen fell in scores around him. This clan is now landless, but none can take away its great tradition. The Chief is MacGillivray of Dunmaglass. (view tartan)
MacGillivray Hunting Ancient
This is one of the oldest branches of the great Confederation of Clan Chattan. One tradition brings them from Lochaber and Morven and tells how, driven out of their earlier home during the reign of Alexander II, they put themselves under the prosecution of Farquahard Mackintosh, 5th of Mackintosh. Another tradition brings them from Mull, where the name has always been usual, and takes a family of them north to Dunmaglass, in Strathnairn, before we have any written record. In 1609, when the Clan Chattan Bond of Union was signed, three MacGillivray chieftains put their names to it. The Clan was out in 1715. In 1745 the Chief, Red Alasdair of the Cattle, led his men and died himself at Culloden beside a spring still called MacGillivrays Well. The clansmen fell in scores around him. This clan is now landless, but none can take away its great tradition. The Chief is MacGillivray of Dunmaglass. (view tartan)
MacGillivray Modern
This is one of the oldest branches of the great Confederation of Clan Chattan. One tradition brings them from Lochaber and Morven and tells how, driven out of their earlier home during the reign of Alexander II, they put themselves under the prosecution of Farquahard Mackintosh, 5th of Mackintosh. Another tradition brings them from Mull, where the name has always been usual, and takes a family of them north to Dunmaglass, in Strathnairn, before we have any written record. In 1609, when the Clan Chattan Bond of Union was signed, three MacGillivray chieftains put their names to it. The Clan was out in 1715. In 1745 the Chief, Red Alasdair of the Cattle, led his men and died himself at Culloden beside a spring still called MacGillivrays Well. The clansmen fell in scores around him. This clan is now landless, but none can take away its great tradition. The Chief is MacGillivray of Dunmaglass. (view tartan)
MacGregor Ancient
One of the most famous of clans, the MacGregors claim royal descent from Grigor, son of King Alpin, who flourished in the 8th century. They possessed Glenorchy, Glenlyon, Glenstrae and other lands in Perth and Argyll. They held their lands by right of the sword and were ferocious and warlike. As a result of their lawlessness their name and part of their lands were proscribed. The MacGregor chief supported Prince Charlie and fought at the Battle of Culloden in 1746. It was not until 1775 that the proscription on their name was removed. Rob Roy, the famous ldquo;outlaw, was a son of Lt.-Col. MacGregor of Glengyle. (view tartan)
MacGregor Hunting Ancient
One of the most famous of clans, the MacGregors claim royal descent from Grigor, son of King Alpin, who flourished in the 8th century. They possessed Glenorchy, Glenlyon, Glenstrae and other lands in Perth and Argyll. They held their lands by right of the sword and were ferocious and warlike. As a result of their lawlessness their name and part of their lands were proscribed. The MacGregor chief supported Prince Charlie and fought at the Battle of Culloden in 1746. It was not until 1775 that the proscription on their name was removed. Rob Roy, the famous ldquo;outlaw, was a son of Lt.-Col. MacGregor of Glengyle. (view tartan)
MacGregor Hunting Modern
One of the most famous of clans, the MacGregors claim royal descent from Grigor, son of King Alpin, who flourished in the 8th century. They possessed Glenorchy, Glenlyon, Glenstrae and other lands in Perth and Argyll. They held their lands by right of the sword and were ferocious and warlike. As a result of their lawlessness their name and part of their lands were proscribed. The MacGregor chief supported Prince Charlie and fought at the Battle of Culloden in 1746. It was not until 1775 that the proscription on their name was removed. Rob Roy, the famous ldquo;outlaw, was a son of Lt.-Col. MacGregor of Glengyle. (view tartan)
MacGregor Modern
One of the most famous of clans, the MacGregors claim royal descent from Grigor, son of King Alpin, who flourished in the 8th century. They possessed Glenorchy, Glenlyon, Glenstrae and other lands in Perth and Argyll. They held their lands by right of the sword and were ferocious and warlike. As a result of their lawlessness their name and part of their lands were proscribed. The MacGregor chief supported Prince Charlie and fought at the Battle of Culloden in 1746. It was not until 1775 that the proscription on their name was removed. Rob Roy, the famous ldquo;outlaw, was a son of Lt.-Col. MacGregor of Glengyle. (view tartan)
MacGregor Rob Roy Ancient
One of the most famous of clans, the MacGregors claim royal descent from Grigor, son of King Alpin, who flourished in the 8th century. They possessed Glenorchy, Glenlyon, Glenstrae and other lands in Perth and Argyll. They held their lands by right of the sword and were ferocious and warlike. As a result of their lawlessness their name and part of their lands were proscribed. The MacGregor chief supported Prince Charlie and fought at the Battle of Culloden in 1746. It was not until 1775 that the proscription on their name was removed. Rob Roy, the famous ldquo;outlaw, was a son of Lt.-Col. MacGregor of Glengyle. (view tartan)
MacGregor Weathered
One of the most famous of clans, the MacGregors claim royal descent from Grigor, son of King Alpin, who flourished in the 8th century. They possessed Glenorchy, Glenlyon, Glenstrae and other lands in Perth and Argyll. They held their lands by right of the sword and were ferocious and warlike. As a result of their lawlessness their name and part of their lands were proscribed. The MacGregor chief supported Prince Charlie and fought at the Battle of Culloden in 1746. It was not until 1775 that the proscription on their name was removed. Rob Roy, the famous quot;outlawquot;, was a son of Lt.-Col. MacGregor of Glengyle. Badge - Pine. (view tartan)
MacHardy Ancient
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MacHardy Modern
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MacInnes Hunting Ancient
This surname comes from the Gaelic Aonghais. The MacInneses are said to have come from the same stock as the MacGillivrays and to be descended from one of the 5th century tribes of the Dalriadic kingdom. Their earliest known home was Morven and they were Constables of Kinlochaline Castle on the Sound of Mull. In 1390 the chief was murdered and the clan appears to have dispersed, some attaching themselves to Clan Campbell, while others became bowmen to the MacKinnons of Skye. In the 1745 Jacobite Rising some MacInnes followed Stewart of Ardsheal. (view tartan)
MacInnes Hunting Modern
This surname comes from the Gaelic Aonghais. The MacInneses are said to have come from the same stock as the MacGillivrays and to be descended from one of the 5th century tribes of the Dalriadic kingdom. Their earliest known home was Morven and they were Constables of Kinlochaline Castle on the Sound of Mull. In 1390 the chief was murdered and the clan appears to have dispersed, some attaching themselves to Clan Campbell, while others became bowmen to the MacKinnons of Skye. In the 1745 Jacobite Rising some MacInnes followed Stewart of Ardsheal. (view tartan)
MacInnes Red Ancient
This surname comes from the Gaelic Aonghais. The MacInneses are said to have come from the same stock as the MacGillivrays and to be descended from one of the 5th century tribes of the Dalriadic kingdom. Their earliest known home was Morven and they were Constables of Kinlochaline Castle on the Sound of Mull. In 1390 the chief was murdered and the clan appears to have dispersed, some attaching themselves to Clan Campbell, while others became bowmen to the MacKinnons of Skye. In the 1745 Jacobite Rising some MacInnes followed Stewart of Ardsheal. (view tartan)
MacInnes Red Weathered
This surname comes from the Gaelic Aonghais. The MacInneses are said to have come from the same stock as the MacGillivrays and to be descended from one of the 5th century tribes of the Dalriadic kingdom. Their earliest known home was Morven and they were Constables of Kinlochaline Castle on the Sound of Mull. In 1390 the chief was murdered and the clan appears to have dispersed, some attaching themselves to Clan Campbell, while others became bowmen to the MacKinnons of Skye. In the 1745 Jacobite Rising some MacInnes followed Stewart of Ardsheal. (view tartan)
MacIntosh Clan Ancient
Inverness-shire is the home of the MacIntoshes. The MacIntosh chiefs were Captains of the Clan Chattan Confederation of Clans. They were powerful and influential in Highland affairs, and their lands stretched from Petty to Lochaber. They engaged in clan feuds and fought at the Battle of Mulroy, the last clan battle against the MacDonnells. During the Jacobite Rising of 1715 the clan were ldquo;out under Brigadier MacIntosh of Borlum. During the 1745 Rising the chief was in Loudons Highlanders, but the clan fought in support of the Jacobites. Anne Farquharson, wife of the chief, was instrumental in saving Prince Charlies life when an attempt was made to capture him. The ldquo;Rout of Moy was planned by her. (view tartan)
MacIntosh Clan Modern
Inverness-shire is the home of the MacIntoshes. The MacIntosh chiefs were Captains of the Clan Chattan Confederation of Clans. They were powerful and influential in Highland affairs, and their lands stretched from Petty to Lochaber. They engaged in clan feuds and fought at the Battle of Mulroy, the last clan battle against the MacDonnells. During the Jacobite Rising of 1715 the clan were ldquo;out under Brigadier MacIntosh of Borlum. During the 1745 Rising the chief was in Loudons Highlanders, but the clan fought in support of the Jacobites. Anne Farquharson, wife of the chief, was instrumental in saving Prince Charlies life when an attempt was made to capture him. The ldquo;Rout of Moy was planned by her. (view tartan)
MacIntosh Clan Weathered
Inverness-shire is the home of the MacIntoshes. The MacIntosh chiefs were Captains of the Clan Chattan Confederation of Clans. They were powerful and influential in Highland affairs, and their lands stretched from Petty to Lochaber. They engaged in clan feuds and fought at the Battle of Mulroy, the last clan battle against the MacDonnells. During the Jacobite Rising of 1715 the clan were ldquo;out under Brigadier MacIntosh of Borlum. During the 1745 Rising the chief was in Loudons Highlanders, but the clan fought in support of the Jacobites. Anne Farquharson, wife of the chief, was instrumental in saving Prince Charlies life when an attempt was made to capture him. The ldquo;Rout of Moy was planned by her. (view tartan)
MacIntosh Hunting Ancient
Inverness-shire is the home of the MacIntoshes. The MacIntosh chiefs were Captains of the Clan Chattan Confederation of Clans. They were powerful and influential in Highland affairs, and their lands stretched from Petty to Lochaber. They engaged in clan feuds and fought at the Battle of Mulroy, the last clan battle against the MacDonnells. During the Jacobite Rising of 1715 the clan were ldquo;out under Brigadier MacIntosh of Borlum. During the 1745 Rising the chief was in Loudons Highlanders, but the clan fought in support of the Jacobites. Anne Farquharson, wife of the chief, was instrumental in saving Prince Charlies life when an attempt was made to capture him. The ldquo;Rout of Moy was planned by her. (view tartan)
MacIntosh Hunting Modern
Inverness-shire is the home of the MacIntoshes. The MacIntosh chiefs were Captains of the Clan Chattan Confederation of Clans. They were powerful and influential in Highland affairs, and their lands stretched from Petty to Lochaber. They engaged in clan feuds and fought at the Battle of Mulroy, the last clan battle against the MacDonnells. During the Jacobite Rising of 1715 the clan were ldquo;out under Brigadier MacIntosh of Borlum. During the 1745 Rising the chief was in Loudons Highlanders, but the clan fought in support of the Jacobites. Anne Farquharson, wife of the chief, was instrumental in saving Prince Charlies life when an attempt was made to capture him. The ldquo;Rout of Moy was planned by her. (view tartan)
MacIntosh Hunting Weathered
Inverness-shire is the home of the MacIntoshes. The MacIntosh chiefs were Captains of the Clan Chattan Confederation of Clans. They were powerful and influential in Highland affairs, and their lands stretched from Petty to Lochaber. They engaged in clan feuds and fought at the Battle of Mulroy, the last clan battle against the MacDonnells. During the Jacobite Rising of 1715 the clan were ldquo;out under Brigadier MacIntosh of Borlum. During the 1745 Rising the chief was in Loudons Highlanders, but the clan fought in support of the Jacobites. Anne Farquharson, wife of the chief, was instrumental in saving Prince Charlies life when an attempt was made to capture him. The ldquo;Rout of Moy was planned by her. (view tartan)
MacIntyre Hunting Ancient
This name is generally accepted as being derived from the Gaelic Mac an-t-saoir, meaning ldquo;son of the carpenter. They are of ancient origin and claim to have sprung from the Clan Donald and to have occupied the land of Glen Noe, Lochetive, for almost 600 years. They were a small clan, and people of the name were found in various parts of Scotland. Some attached themselves to the Stewarts of Appin and fought in the Appin Regiment during the 1745 Rising. The Badenoch MacIntyres were attached to Clan Chattan. (view tartan)
MacIntyre Hunting Modern
This name is generally accepted as being derived from the Gaelic Mac an-t-saoir, meaning ldquo;son of the carpenter. They are of ancient origin and claim to have sprung from the Clan Donald and to have occupied the land of Glen Noe, Lochetive, for almost 600 years. They were a small clan, and people of the name were found in various parts of Scotland. Some attached themselves to the Stewarts of Appin and fought in the Appin Regiment during the 1745 Rising. The Badenoch MacIntyres were attached to Clan Chattan. (view tartan)
MacIntyre of Glenorchy Ancient
This name is generally accepted as being derived from the Gaelic Mac an-t-saoir, meaning son of the carpenter. They are of ancient origin and claim to have sprung from the Clan Donald and to have occupied the land of Glen Noe, Lochetive, for almost 600 years. They were a small clan, and people of the name were found in various parts of Scotland. Some attached themselves to the Stewarts of Appin and fought in the Appin Regiment during the 1745 Rising. The Badenoch MacIntyres were attached to Clan Chattan. (view tartan)
MacIntyre of Glenorchy Modern
This name is generally accepted as being derived from the Gaelic Mac an-t-saoir, meaning ldquo;son of the carpenter. They are of ancient origin and claim to have sprung from the Clan Donald and to have occupied the land of Glen Noe, Lochetive, for almost 600 years. They were a small clan, and people of the name were found in various parts of Scotland. Some attached themselves to the Stewarts of Appin and fought in the Appin Regiment during the 1745 Rising. The Badenoch MacIntyres were attached to Clan Chattan. (view tartan)
MacIver Ancient
Known as the Clan Ivor Glassary, the MacIvors, at an early date, possessed lands in Argyll. They claim to have formed part of the army of King Alexander II which conquered Argyll in 1221. For a time the clan lost its strength and some members migrated to Lochaber and other parts of the Highlands. By the 16th century they increasedd in strength and the Lergachonzie branch was the most prominent. In the late 17th century the 10th Earl of Argyll restored the MacIvor estates to the chief on condition that he and his heirs took the name Campbell. This the Argyllshire MacIvors appeared to have done but the Highland MacIvors continued to use their own name. Badges - Bog Myrtle, Fir Club Moss (view tartan)
MacIver Modern
Known as the Clan Ivor Glassary, the MacIvors, at an early date, possessed lands in Argyll. They claim to have formed part of the army of King Alexander II which conquered Argyll in 1221. For a time the clan lost its strength and some members migrated to Lochaber and other parts of the Highlands. By the 16th century they increasedd in strength and the Lergachonzie branch was the most prominent. In the late 17th century the 10th Earl of Argyll restored the MacIvor estates to the chief on condition that he and his heirs took the name Campbell. This the Argyllshire MacIvors appeared to have done but the Highland MacIvors continued to use their own name. Badges - Bog Myrtle, Fir Club Moss. (view tartan)
MacKay Ancient
During their long history this Sutherland clan has played a leading part in the affairs of the north. They claim descent from the Royal House of NacEth, Mormaers of Moray. Their first Sutherland lands were at Durness, but by the 16th century they owned large areas of that county. They were numerous and warlike and were almost continually engaged in feuds with their neighbours, particularly the Sutherlands. Sir Donald MacKay of Farr, in 1626, raised 3,000 of his clansmen to fight during the wars of Gustavus Adolphus. Sir Donald was raised to the peerage as Lord Reay in 1628. The MacKay estates were sold to the House of Sutherland at the beginning of the 19th century. (view tartan)
MacKay Blue Ancient
During their long history this Sutherland clan has played a leading part in the affairs of the north. They claim descent from the Royal House of NacEth, Mormaers of Moray. Their first Sutherland lands were at Durness, but by the 16th century they owned large areas of that county. They were numerous and warlike and were almost continually engaged in feuds with their neighbours, particularly the Sutherlands. Sir Donald MacKay of Farr, in 1626, raised 3,000 of his clansmen to fight during the wars of Gustavus Adolphus. Sir Donald was raised to the peerage as Lord Reay in 1628. The MacKay estates were sold to the House of Sutherland at the beginning of the 19th century. (view tartan)
MacKay Modern
During their long history this Sutherland clan has played a leading part in the affairs of the north. They claim descent from the Royal House of NacEth, Mormaers of Moray. Their first Sutherland lands were at Durness, but by the 16th century they owned large areas of that county. They were numerous and warlike and were almost continually engaged in feuds with their neighbours, particularly the Sutherlands. Sir Donald MacKay of Farr, in 1626, raised 3,000 of his clansmen to fight during the wars of Gustavus Adolphus. Sir Donald was raised to the peerage as Lord Reay in 1628. The MacKay estates were sold to the House of Sutherland at the beginning of the 19th century. (view tartan)
MacKay Weathered
During their long history this Sutherland clan has played a leading part in the affairs of the north. They claim descent from the Royal House of NacEth, Mormaers of Moray. Their first Sutherland lands were at Durness, but by the 16th century they owned large areas of that county. They were numerous and warlike and were almost continually engaged in feuds with their neighbours, particularly the Sutherlands. Sir Donald MacKay of Farr, in 1626, raised 3,000 of his clansmen to fight during the wars of Gustavus Adolphus. Sir Donald was raised to the peerage as Lord Reay in 1628. The MacKay estates were sold to the House of Sutherland at the beginning of the 19th century. (view tartan)
MacKellar Modern
The MacKellars are a sept of the Clan Campbell. The surname is thought to be derived from the latin quot;Hilariousquot;. From 1470, the MacKellars owned the lands of Ardare in Glassary. The tartan is of modern origin and can be traced back to about 1930. (view tartan)
MacKenzie Ancient
This clan possessed Kintail in the 14th century and take their name from a chief named Kenneth who lived in the 13th century. They were a strong and powerful clan and feuded with their neighbours. They fought against the MacDonalds at the Battle of Blair-na-park in 1491. About 1607 they acquired lands of Lochcarron and Lochalsh. In 1609 Kenneth MacKenzie was created Lord MacKenzie, and the 2nd Lord was made Earl of Seaforth in 1623. They fought in the 1715 Rising and at the Battle of Glenshiel in 1719. They were a numerous clan and in the 18th century could muster 2,500 fighting men. (view tartan)
MacKenzie Dress Ancient
This clan possessed Kintail in the 14th century and take their name from a chief named Kenneth who lived in the 13th century. They were a strong and powerful clan and feuded with their neighbours. They fought against the MacDonalds at the Battle of Blair-na-park in 1491. About 1607 they acquired lands of Lochcarron and Lochalsh. In 1609 Kenneth MacKenzie was created Lord MacKenzie, and the 2nd Lord was made Earl of Seaforth in 1623. They fought in the 1715 Rising and at the Battle of Glenshiel in 1719. They were a numerous clan and in the 18th century could muster 2,500 fighting men. (view tartan)
MacKenzie Dress Modern
This clan possessed Kintail in the 14th century and take their name from a chief named Kenneth who lived in the 13th century. They were a strong and powerful clan and feuded with their neighbours. They fought against the MacDonalds at the Battle of Blair-na-park in 1491. About 1607 they acquired lands of Lochcarron and Lochalsh. In 1609 Kenneth MacKenzie was created Lord MacKenzie, and the 2nd Lord was made Earl of Seaforth in 1623. They fought in the 1715 Rising and at the Battle of Glenshiel in 1719. They were a numerous clan and in the 18th century could muster 2,500 fighting men. (view tartan)
MacKenzie Modern
This clan possessed Kintail in the 14th century and take their name from a chief named Kenneth who lived in the 13th century. They were a strong and powerful clan and feuded with their neighbours. They fought against the MacDonalds at the Battle of Blair-na-park in 1491. About 1607 they acquired lands of Lochcarron and Lochalsh. In 1609 Kenneth MacKenzie was created Lord MacKenzie, and the 2nd Lord was made Earl of Seaforth in 1623. They fought in the 1715 Rising and at the Battle of Glenshiel in 1719. They were a numerous clan and in the 18th century could muster 2,500 fighting men. (view tartan)
MacKenzie Weathered
This clan possessed Kintail in the 14th century and take their name from a chief named Kenneth who lived in the 13th century. They were a strong and powerful clan and feuded with their neighbours. They fought against the MacDonalds at the Battle of Blair-na-park in 1491. About 1607 they acquired lands of Lochcarron and Lochalsh. In 1609 Kenneth MacKenzie was created Lord MacKenzie, and the 2nd Lord was made Earl of Seaforth in 1623. They fought in the 1715 Rising and at the Battle of Glenshiel in 1719. They were a numerous clan and in the 18th century could muster 2,500 fighting men. (view tartan)
MacKillop Modern
(view tartan)
MacKinlay Ancient
Lennox was the home of this family who claim descent from Finlay, son of Buchanan of Drumkill. In Gaelic the name is MacFhionnlaigh, meaning quot;son of Finlayquot;, or Finlayson. Little is known regarding them, but during the Irish quot;plantationquot; of the 17th century, some MacKinlays are said to have settled in Ulster where the name appears as Macginlay. People of the name were fairly numerous in the Glasgow area and near Loch Lomond, and some are found further north. William MacKinlay, President of the United States of America, was descended from David MacKinlay, an Ulster Scot. (view tartan)
MacKinlay Modern
Lennox was the home of this family who claim descent from Finlay, son of Buchanan of Drumkill. In Gaelic the name is MacFhionnlaigh, meaning quot;son of Finlayquot;, or Finlayson. Little is known regarding them, but during the Irish quot;plantationquot; of the 17th century, some MacKinlays are said to have settled in Ulster where the name appears as Macginlay. People of the name were fairly numerous in the Glasgow area and near Loch Lomond, and some are found further north. William MacKinlay, President of the United States of America, was descended from David MacKinlay, an Ulster Scot. (view tartan)
MacKinnon Hunting Ancient
The MacKinnons are a West Highland clan and claim descent from Fingon, the great grandson of Kenneth MacAlpin, King of Scots, who was killed in 837. Their earliest possessions were in Mull, but in 1594 they obtained the lands of Strathardel, in Skye. John MacKinnon, who died in 1550, was the last Abbot of Iona. They fought at the Battle of Inverlochy, and were, later at the Battle of Worcester, in support of King Charles II. They supported the Jacobites in the Risings of 1715 and 1745. The chief was taken prisoner during the last Rising and was imprisoned in the Tower of London. He died in 1756. (view tartan)
MacKinnon Hunting Modern
The MacKinnons are a West Highland clan and claim descent from Fingon, the great grandson of Kenneth MacAlpin, King of Scots, who was killed in 837. Their earliest possessions were in Mull, but in 1594 they obtained the lands of Strathardel, in Skye. John MacKinnon, who died in 1550, was the last Abbot of Iona. They fought at the Battle of Inverlochy, and were, later at the Battle of Worcester, in support of King Charles II. They supported the Jacobites in the Risings of 1715 and 1745. The chief was taken prisoner during the last Rising and was imprisoned in the Tower of London. He died in 1756. (view tartan)
MacKinnon Red Ancient
The MacKinnons are a West Highland clan and claim descent from Fingon, the great grandson of Kenneth MacAlpin, King of Scots, who was killed in 837. Their earliest possessions were in Mull, but in 1594 they obtained the lands of Strathardel, in Skye. John MacKinnon, who died in 1550, was the last Abbot of Iona. They fought at the Battle of Inverlochy, and were, later at the Battle of Worcester, in support of King Charles II. They supported the Jacobites in the Risings of 1715 and 1745. The chief was taken prisoner during the last Rising and was imprisoned in the Tower of London. He died in 1756. (view tartan)
MacKinnon Red Modern
The MacKinnons are a West Highland clan and claim descent from Fingon, the great grandson of Kenneth MacAlpin, King of Scots, who was killed in 837. Their earliest possessions were in Mull, but in 1594 they obtained the lands of Strathardel, in Skye. John MacKinnon, who died in 1550, was the last Abbot of Iona. They fought at the Battle of Inverlochy, and were, later at the Battle of Worcester, in support of King Charles II. They supported the Jacobites in the Risings of 1715 and 1745. The chief was taken prisoner during the last Rising and was imprisoned in the Tower of London. He died in 1756. (view tartan)
MacLachlan Ancient
This ancient clan possessed Strathlachlan, Argyllshire, in the 11th century. Gillespie MacLachlan was a member of King Robert the Bruce's first parliament in St Andrews in 1308. During the 1745 Jacobite Rising, the chief led his clan to join Prince Charlie's army. He was appointed A.D.C. to the Prince and was killed at the Battle of Culloden in April, 1746. His lands were forfeited, but were later restored to his heir. The MacLachlans derive their name from a 13th century chief called Lachlan Mor. Badge - Rowan. (view tartan)
MacLachlan Modern
This ancient clan possessed Strathlachlan, Argyllshire, in the 11th century. Gillespie MacLachlan was a member of King Robert the Bruce's first parliament in St Andrews in 1308. During the 1745 Jacobite Rising, the chief led his clan to join Prince Charlie's army. He was appointed A.D.C. to the Prince and was killed at the Battle of Culloden in April, 1746. His lands were forfeited, but were later restored to his heir. The MacLachlans derive their name from a 13th century chief called Lachlan Mor. Badge - Rowan. (view tartan)
MacLachlan Old Ancient
This ancient clan possessed Strathlachlan, Argyllshire, in the 11th century. Gillespie MacLachlan was a member of King Robert the Bruces first parliament in St Andrews in 1308. During the 1745 Jacobite Rising, the chief led his clan to join Prince Charlies army. He was appointed A.D.C. to the Prince and was killed at the Battle of Culloden in April, 1746. His lands were forfeited, but were later restored to his heir. The MacLachlans derive their name from a 13th century chief called Lachlan Mor. (view tartan)
MacLachlan Old Modern
This ancient clan possessed Strathlachlan, Argyllshire, in the 11th century. Gillespie MacLachlan was a member of King Robert the Bruces first parliament in St Andrews in 1308. During the 1745 Jacobite Rising, the chief led his clan to join Prince Charlies army. He was appointed A.D.C. to the Prince and was killed at the Battle of Culloden in April, 1746. His lands were forfeited, but were later restored to his heir. The MacLachlans derive their name from a 13th century chief called Lachlan Mor. (view tartan)
MacLaine of Lochbuie Hunting Ancient
The MacLaines of Lochbuie are descended from Hector, brother of the progenitor of the MacLeans of Duart. Charters confirming their ownership of their lands were granted by King James IV. In a dispute with MacLean of Duart, the chief's son lost possession of his lands, but later regained them. The MacLaines were staunch supporters of the Royal Stuarts and fought for them under the Marquis of Montrose, and at Killiecrankie under Viscount Dundee. The MacLeans of Dochgarroch, near Inverness, are descended from Charles, son of Hector, the founder of the Lochbuie MacLaines. (view tartan)
MacLaine of Lochbuie Modern Heavy Tartan
The MacLaines of Lochbuie are descended from Hector, brother of the progenitor of the MacLeans of Duart. Charters confirming their ownership of their lands were granted by King James IV. In a dispute with MacLean of Duart, the chief's son lost possession of his lands, but later regained them. The MacLaines were staunch supporters of the Royal Stuarts and fought for them under the Marquis of Montrose, and at Killiecrankie under Viscount Dundee. The MacLeans of Dochgarroch, near Inverness, are descended from Charles, son of Hector, the founder of the Lochbuie MacLaines. (view tartan)
MacLaren Ancient
The MacLarens are recorded as being in possession of lands in Balquhidder in the 12th century. They also possessed the Island of Tiree. They fought at the battles of Sauchieburn, Flodden and Pinkie and were loyal to the Royal Stuarts. They were a warlike clan and engaged in feuds with other clans. The mother of the founder of the Stewarts of Appin was a MacLaren. The clan participated at the Jacobite Rising of 1745 and many of them died at the Battle of Culloden. John McLaren, Lord Dreghorn, descended from the MacLarens of Tiree, was, in 1781, recognised as chief of the clan. (view tartan)
MacLaren Modern
The MacLarens are recorded as being in possession of lands in Balquhidder in the 12th century. They also possessed the Island of Tiree. They fought at the battles of Sauchieburn, Flodden and Pinkie and were loyal to the Royal Stuarts. They were a warlike clan and engaged in feuds with other clans. The mother of the founder of the Stewarts of Appin was a MacLaren. The clan participated at the Jacobite Rising of 1745 and many of them died at the Battle of Culloden. John McLaren, Lord Dreghorn, descended from the MacLarens of Tiree, was, in 1781, recognised as chief of the clan. (view tartan)
MacLaren Weathered
The MacLarens are recorded as being in possession of lands in Balquhidder in the 12th century. They also possessed the Island of Tiree. They fought at the battles of Sauchieburn, Flodden and Pinkie and were loyal to the Royal Stuarts. They were a warlike clan and engaged in feuds with other clans. The mother of the founder of the Stewarts of Appin was a MacLaren. The clan participated at the Jacobite Rising of 1745 and many of them died at the Battle of Culloden. John McLaren, Lord Dreghorn, descended from the MacLarens of Tiree, was, in 1781, recognised as chief of the clan. (view tartan)
MacLean Hunting Ancient
This clan held extensive lands in the Western Isles and mainland of the Highlands. They claim descent from Gillean of the Battle Axe, who lived during the reign of King Alexander III. The MacLeans followed the MacDonalds, Lords of the Isles, and fought at the Battle of Harlaw in 1411. They became powerful, but declined in influence in the 16th century. They were Royalists and supported the Royal Stuarts. In 1632 Lachlan MacLean of Morven was created a Baronet. At the Battle of Inverkeithing seven MacLeans, all brothers, died trying to protect their chief. As each fell he called, ldquo;Another for Hector. (view tartan)
MacLean Hunting Modern
This clan held extensive lands in the Western Isles and mainland of the Highlands. They claim descent from Gillean of the Battle Axe, who lived during the reign of King Alexander III. The MacLeans followed the MacDonalds, Lords of the Isles, and fought at the Battle of Harlaw in 1411. They became powerful, but declined in influence in the 16th century. They were Royalists and supported the Royal Stuarts. In 1632 Lachlan MacLean of Morven was created a Baronet. At the Battle of Inverkeithing seven MacLeans, all brothers, died trying to protect their chief. As each fell he called, ldquo;Another for Hector. (view tartan)
MacLean of Duart Ancient
This clan held extensive lands in the Western Isles and mainland of the Highlands. They claim descent from Gillean of the Battle Axe, who lived during the reign of King Alexander III. The MacLeans followed the MacDonalds, Lords of the Isles, and fought at the Battle of Harlaw in 1411. They became powerful, but declined in influence in the 16th century. They were Royalists and supported the Royal Stuarts. In 1632 Lachlan MacLean of Morven was created a Baronet. At the Battle of Inverkeithing seven MacLeans, all brothers, died trying to protect their chief. As each fell he called, ldquo;Another for Hector. (view tartan)
MacLean of Duart Modern
This clan held extensive lands in the Western Isles and mainland of the Highlands. They claim descent from Gillean of the Battle Axe, who lived during the reign of King Alexander III. The MacLeans followed the MacDonalds, Lords of the Isles, and fought at the Battle of Harlaw in 1411. They became powerful, but declined in influence in the 16th century. They were Royalists and supported the Royal Stuarts. In 1632 Lachlan MacLean of Morven was created a Baronet. At the Battle of Inverkeithing seven MacLeans, all brothers, died trying to protect their chief. As each fell he called, ldquo;Another for Hector. (view tartan)
MacLean of Duart Weathered
This clan held extensive lands in the Western Isles and mainland of the Highlands. They claim descent from Gillean of the Battle Axe, who lived during the reign of King Alexander III. The MacLeans followed the MacDonalds, Lords of the Isles, and fought at the Battle of Harlaw in 1411. They became powerful, but declined in influence in the 16th century. They were Royalists and supported the Royal Stuarts. In 1632 Lachlan MacLean of Morven was created a Baronet. At the Battle of Inverkeithing seven MacLeans, all brothers, died trying to protect their chief. As each fell he called, ldquo;Another for Hector. (view tartan)
MacLellan Ancient
The MacLellan Tartan can be traced back to 1881 and has also been associated with the name Maclaren, Gillies and MacLeish. The MacLellans as a family were numerous in Galloway and also around Aberfeldy and Morar and, although they are claimed as septs of the MacDonald, MacNab, MacLennan and Douglas Clans, they are now established themselves as a strong independent Clan. (view tartan)
MacLennan Ancient
There are two distinct branches of this family, one Highland and the other Lowland. In the Lowlands, Restalrig, near Edinburgh, was the chief possession of the family, and Sir Robert of Restalrig married a daughter of King Robert II. He was appointed Admiral of Scotland in 1400. The Highland family are said to have as their ancestor Gilligorm, who was killed at the Battle of Drumderfit, in the Black Isle, Ross-shire. His son was educated at Beauly Priory and after taking Holy Orders went to Skye. He married and his family became known as MacLennans. The name is common in many parts of the Highlands. Badge - Furze. (view tartan)
MacLennan Modern
There are two distinct branches of this family, one Highland and the other Lowland. In the Lowlands, Restalrig, near Edinburgh, was the chief possession of the family, and Sir Robert of Restalrig married a daughter of King Robert II. He was appointed Admiral of Scotland in 1400. The Highland family are said to have as their ancestor Gilligorm, who was killed at the Battle of Drumderfit, in the Black Isle, Ross-shire. His son was educated at Beauly Priory and after taking Holy Orders went to Skye. He married and his family became known as MacLennans. The name is common in many parts of the Highlands. Badge - Furze. (view tartan)
MacLennan Weathered
There are two distinct branches of this family, one Highland and the other Lowland. In the Lowlands, Restalrig, near Edinburgh, was the chief possession of the family, and Sir Robert of Restalrig married a daughter of King Robert II. He was appointed Admiral of Scotland in 1400. The Highland family are said to have as their ancestor Gilligorm, who was killed at the Battle of Drumderfit, in the Black Isle, Ross-shire. His son was educated at Beauly Priory and after taking Holy Orders went to Skye. He married and his family became known as MacLennans. The name is common in many parts of the Highlands. Badge - Furze. (view tartan)
MacLeod Dress Ancient
Leod, son of Olaf, King of Man, is the progenitor of this clan. They acquired Dunvegan at an early date. The MacLeods of Dunvegan and Harris are known as Siol Tormod, and the MacLeods of Lewis as Siol Torquil. The MacLeods of Dunvegan and Harris are recognised as the senior family. They were a powerful clan and had great influence in the Highlands. The 13th chief, Rory Mor, was knighted in 1603 by James VI. They supported King Charles II at Worcester in 1651, when almost 700 MacLeods are said to have been killed. They did not support the Jacobite Risings of 1715 and 1745. (view tartan)
MacLeod Dress Modern
Leod, son of Olaf, King of Man, is the progenitor of this clan. They acquired Dunvegan at an early date. The MacLeods of Dunvegan and Harris are known as Siol Tormod, and the MacLeods of Lewis as Siol Torquil. The MacLeods of Dunvegan and Harris are recognised as the senior family. They were a powerful clan and had great influence in the Highlands. The 13th chief, Rory Mor, was knighted in 1603 by James VI. They supported King Charles II at Worcester in 1651, when almost 700 MacLeods are said to have been killed. They did not support the Jacobite Risings of 1715 and 1745. (view tartan)
MacLeod Dress Weathered
Leod, son of Olaf, King of Man, is the progenitor of this clan. They acquired Dunvegan at an early date. The MacLeods of Dunvegan and Harris are known as Siol Tormod, and the MacLeods of Lewis as Siol Torquil. The MacLeods of Dunvegan and Harris are recognised as the senior family. They were a powerful clan and had great influence in the Highlands. The 13th chief, Rory Mor, was knighted in 1603 by James VI. They supported King Charles II at Worcester in 1651, when almost 700 MacLeods are said to have been killed. They did not support the Jacobite Risings of 1715 and 1745. (view tartan)
MacLeod of Harris Ancient
Leod, son of Olaf, King of Man, is the progenitor of this clan. They acquired Dunvegan at an early date. The MacLeods of Dunvegan and Harris are known as Siol Tormod, and the MacLeods of Lewis as Siol Torquil. The MacLeods of Dunvegan and Harris are recognised as the senior family. They were a powerful clan and had great influence in the Highlands. The 13th chief, Rory Mor, was knighted in 1603 by James VI. They supported King Charles II at Worcester in 1651, when almost 700 MacLeods are said to have been killed. They did not support the Jacobite Risings of 1715 and 1745. (view tartan)
MacLeod of Harris Modern
Leod, son of Olaf, King of Man, is the progenitor of this clan. They acquired Dunvegan at an early date. The MacLeods of Dunvegan and Harris are known as Siol Tormod, and the MacLeods of Lewis as Siol Torquil. The MacLeods of Dunvegan and Harris are recognised as the senior family. They were a powerful clan and had great influence in the Highlands. The 13th chief, Rory Mor, was knighted in 1603 by James VI. They supported King Charles II at Worcester in 1651, when almost 700 MacLeods are said to have been killed. They did not support the Jacobite Risings of 1715 and 1745. (view tartan)
MacLeod of Harris Weathered
Leod, son of Olaf, King of Man, is the progenitor of this clan. They acquired Dunvegan at an early date. The MacLeods of Dunvegan and Harris are known as Siol Tormod, and the MacLeods of Lewis as Siol Torquil. The MacLeods of Dunvegan and Harris are recognised as the senior family. They were a powerful clan and had great influence in the Highlands. The 13th chief, Rory Mor, was knighted in 1603 by James VI. They supported King Charles II at Worcester in 1651, when almost 700 MacLeods are said to have been killed. They did not support the Jacobite Risings of 1715 and 1745. (view tartan)
MacMillan Hunting Ancient
Various claims have been put forward regarding the origin of this clan and it is now generally believed they have some ecclesiastical connection. There were MacMillans in Lochaber in the 12th century and they followed Cameron of Lochiel. Later they migrated to Lawers, in Perthshire, but were driven out in the 14th century. MacMillans were in Knapdale, in Argyll, and in Galloway. The Knapdale family gained in importance and were considered the chief branch. Another prominent family was Dunmore. The Galloway MacMillans were noted Covenanters. The chiefship of the clan is now in the Laggalgarve branch. (view tartan)
MacMillan Hunting Modern
Various claims have been put forward regarding the origin of this clan and it is now generally believed they have some ecclesiastical connection. There were MacMillans in Lochaber in the 12th century and they followed Cameron of Lochiel. Later they migrated to Lawers, in Perthshire, but were driven out in the 14th century. MacMillans were in Knapdale, in Argyll, and in Galloway. The Knapdale family gained in importance and were considered the chief branch. Another prominent family was Dunmore. The Galloway MacMillans were noted Covenanters. The chiefship of the clan is now in the Laggalgarve branch. (view tartan)
MacMillan Old Ancient
Various claims have been put forward regarding the origin of this clan and it is now generally believed they have some ecclesiastical connection. There were MacMillans in Lochaber in the 12th century and they followed Cameron of Lochiel. Later they migrated to Lawers, in Perthshire, but were driven out in the 14th century. MacMillans were in Knapdale, in Argyll, and in Galloway. The Knapdale family gained in importance and were considered the chief branch. Another prominent family was Dunmore. The Galloway MacMillans were noted Covenanters. The chiefship of the clan is now in the Laggalgarve branch. (view tartan)
MacMillan Old Modern
Various claims have been put forward regarding the origin of this clan and it is now generally believed they have some ecclesiastical connection. There were MacMillans in Lochaber in the 12th century and they followed Cameron of Lochiel. Later they migrated to Lawers, in Perthshire, but were driven out in the 14th century. MacMillans were in Knapdale, in Argyll, and in Galloway. The Knapdale family gained in importance and were considered the chief branch. Another prominent family was Dunmore. The Galloway MacMillans were noted Covenanters. The chiefship of the clan is now in the Laggalgarve branch. (view tartan)
MacMillan Old Weathered
Various claims have been put forward regarding the origin of this clan and it is now generally believed they have some ecclesiastical connection. There were MacMillans in Lochaber in the 12th century and they followed Cameron of Lochiel. Later they migrated to Lawers, in Perthshire, but were driven out in the 14th century. MacMillans were in Knapdale, in Argyll, and in Galloway. The Knapdale family gained in importance and were considered the chief branch. Another prominent family was Dunmore. The Galloway MacMillans were noted Covenanters. The chiefship of the clan is now in the Laggalgarve branch. (view tartan)
MacNab Ancient
In Gaelic the MacNabs are called Clan-an-aba, meaning, quot;Children of the Abbotquot;. They claim to be descended from the Abbot of Glendochart. They held lands at Loch Tay, but these were forfeited following their opposition to King Robert the Bruce. King David II, in 1336, gave a charter of the Barony of Bovain, Glendochart, to Gilbert MacNab. They supported Montrose's Rebellion in 1645. The chief supported the Government in 1745, but the clan fought for Prince Charlie. The 12th chief is the subject of Raeburn's famous painting. (view tartan)
MacNab Modern
In Gaelic the MacNabs are called Clan-an-aba, meaning, quot;Children of the Abbotquot;. They claim to be descended from the Abbot of Glendochart. They held lands at Loch Tay, but these were forfeited following their opposition to King Robert the Bruce. King David II, in 1336, gave a charter of the Barony of Bovain, Glendochart, to Gilbert MacNab. They supported Montrose's Rebellion in 1645. The chief supported the Government in 1745, but the clan fought for Prince Charlie. The 12th chief is the subject of Raeburn's famous painting. (view tartan)
MacNaughton Ancient
In the 12th century this clan possessed lands in Strathtay and, a century later, were occupying lands on Loch Awe and Loch Fyne. Donald MacNaughton opposed King Robert the Bruce and lost most of his possessions. In the reign of King David II they acquired lands in Lewis. Sir Alexander MacNaughton, who was knighted by King James IV, was killed at the Battle of Flodden in 1513. The MacNaughtons were loyal to the Royal House of Stuart and fought for the Restoration of that line of monarchs. The estates passed out of MacNaughton possession about 1691. (view tartan)
MacNaughton Modern
In the 12th century this clan possessed lands in Strathtay and, a century later, were occupying lands on Loch Awe and Loch Fyne. Donald MacNaughton opposed King Robert the Bruce and lost most of his possessions. In the reign of King David II they acquired lands in Lewis. Sir Alexander MacNaughton, who was knighted by King James IV, was killed at the Battle of Flodden in 1513. The MacNaughtons were loyal to the Royal House of Stuart and fought for the Restoration of that line of monarchs. The estates passed out of MacNaughton possession about 1691. (view tartan)
MacNaughton Weathered
In the 12th century this clan possessed lands in Strathtay and, a century later, were occupying lands on Loch Awe and Loch Fyne. Donald MacNaughton opposed King Robert the Bruce and lost most of his possessions. In the reign of King David II they acquired lands in Lewis. Sir Alexander MacNaughton, who was knighted by King James IV, was killed at the Battle of Flodden in 1513. The MacNaughtons were loyal to the Royal House of Stuart and fought for the Restoration of that line of monarchs. The estates passed out of MacNaughton possession about 1691. (view tartan)
MacNeil of Barra Ancient
The progenitor of this clan is said to have settled in Barra in the 11th century. Neil Og, 6th chief, supported King Robert the Bruce during the War of Independence. The fortress of Kismull Castle was the home of the Chiefs. Roderick, 15th chief, was called quot;the turbulentquot;, and was arrested for piracy against an English ship. He successfully defended himself. Barra was made a Crown Barony in 1688, and the 18th chief supported Claverhouse's campaign in 1689. The MacNeils of Barra supported the Jacobite Risings of 1715 and 1745. Barra was sold by the 21st chief in 1838, but was repurchased by the present chief in 1938 (view tartan)
MacNeil of Barra Modern
The progenitor of this clan is said to have settled in Barra in the 11th century. Neil Og, 6th chief, supported King Robert the Bruce during the War of Independence. The fortress of Kismull Castle was the home of the Chiefs. Roderick, 15th chief, was called quot;the turbulentquot;, and was arrested for piracy against an English ship. He successfully defended himself. Barra was made a Crown Barony in 1688, and the 18th chief supported Claverhouse's campaign in 1689. The MacNeils of Barra supported the Jacobite Risings of 1715 and 1745. Barra was sold by the 21st chief in 1838, but was repurchased by the present chief in 1938. (view tartan)
MacNeil Of Colonsay Ancient
Donald MacNeil of Crerar, son of John Og MacNeil, descendant of Torquil MacNeil of Taynish, was the founder of this family. He exchanged the lands of Crerar with the Duke of Argyll for Colonsay and Oronsay in the 18th century. The 6th MacNeil, sold Colonsay to his brother, Duncan, in 1846. Duncan MacNeil, who was Lord Justice General, was created Lord Colonsay in 1867 and had a distinguished career. He was succeeded by his nephew, maj.-General Sir John C. MacNeil of Gigha, on whose death, in 1904, Colonsay was sold. (view tartan)
MacPhail Hunting Ancient
McPhail comes from the Gaelic, meaning Son of Paul. The MacPhails are not a clan in the full Highland sense, but form separate septs of the Mackays, the Camerons and Clan Chattan. The northern (MacKay) MacPhails are descended from Paul Mac Ic-tire, Son of the Wolf, a noted freebooter of the 14th century, Lord of Strathcarron, Strathoykell and Westray, with his fortress at Dun Creich on the Kyle of Sutherland. Concerning the MacPhails of Clan Chattan it is recorded that, in the time of Duncan, 11th Chief, there lived one Sir Andrew MacPhail, the priest, of whom Clan MacPhail had their beginning. The Cameron sept appears eventually to have become one with that of the Clan Chattan. There is no blood connection between the MacPhails of the north and those of the other two clans. (view tartan)
MacPhail Red Modern
McPhail comes from the Gaelic, meaning Son of Paul. The MacPhails are not a clan in the full Highland sense, but form separate septs of the Mackays, the Camerons and Clan Chattan. The northern (MacKay) MacPhails are descended from Paul Mac Ic-tire, Son of the Wolf, a noted freebooter of the 14th century, Lord of Strathcarron, Strathoykell and Westray, with his fortress at Dun Creich on the Kyle of Sutherland. Concerning the MacPhails of Clan Chattan it is recorded that, in the time of Duncan, 11th Chief, there lived one Sir Andrew MacPhail, the priest, of whom Clan MacPhail had their beginning. The Cameron sept appears eventually to have become one with that of the Clan Chattan. There is no blood connection between the MacPhails of the north and those of the other two clans. (view tartan)
MacPherson Clan Ancient
Badenoch is the home of the MacPhersons who claim to have been the early chiefs of Clan Chattan before that clan name came under Mackintosh leadership. The family of Cluny is the chief branch, but there are many important and famous branches. The MacPhersons were Royalists and aided the Royal Stuarts during the Jacobite Risings of 1715 and 1745. After the 1745 Rising, Cluny MacPherson, who assisted Prince Charlie to escape, was in hiding on his own estate for nine years and a reward of pound;1,000 was offered for his capture. Cluny Castle was burned by Government troops, but was later rebuilt. In 1784, the estates, which had been forfeited, were restored but were sold on the death of the 17th chief. (view tartan)
MacPherson Clan Modern
Badenoch is the home of the MacPhersons who claim to have been the early chiefs of Clan Chattan before that clan name came under Mackintosh leadership. The family of Cluny is the chief branch, but there are many important and famous branches. The MacPhersons were Royalists and aided the Royal Stuarts during the Jacobite Risings of 1715 and 1745. After the 1745 Rising, Cluny MacPherson, who assisted Prince Charlie to escape, was in hiding on his own estate for nine years and a reward of pound;1,000 was offered for his capture. Cluny Castle was burned by Government troops, but was later rebuilt. In 1784, the estates, which had been forfeited, were restored but were sold on the death of the 17th chief. (view tartan)
MacPherson Clan Weathered
Badenoch is the home of the MacPhersons who claim to have been the early chiefs of Clan Chattan before that clan name came under Mackintosh leadership. The family of Cluny is the chief branch, but there are many important and famous branches. The MacPhersons were Royalists and aided the Royal Stuarts during the Jacobite Risings of 1715 and 1745. After the 1745 Rising, Cluny MacPherson, who assisted Prince Charlie to escape, was in hiding on his own estate for nine years and a reward of pound;1,000 was offered for his capture. Cluny Castle was burned by Government troops, but was later rebuilt. In 1784, the estates, which had been forfeited, were restored but were sold on the death of the 17th chief. (view tartan)
MacPherson Dress Ancient
Badenoch is the home of the MacPhersons who claim to have been the early chiefs of Clan Chattan before that clan name came under Mackintosh leadership. The family of Cluny is the chief branch, but there are many important and famous branches. The MacPhersons were Royalists and aided the Royal Stuarts during the Jacobite Risings of 1715 and 1745. After the 1745 Rising, Cluny MacPherson, who assisted Prince Charlie to escape, was in hiding on his own estate for nine years and a reward of pound;1,000 was offered for his capture. Cluny Castle was burned by Government troops, but was later rebuilt. In 1784, the estates, which had been forfeited, were restored but were sold on the death of the 17th chief. (view tartan)
MacPherson Hunting Ancient
Badenoch is the home of the MacPhersons who claim to have been the early chiefs of Clan Chattan before that clan name came under Mackintosh leadership. The family of Cluny is the chief branch, but there are many important and famous branches. The MacPhersons were Royalists and aided the Royal Stuarts during the Jacobite Risings of 1715 and 1745. After the 1745 Rising, Cluny MacPherson, who assisted Prince Charlie to escape, was in hiding on his own estate for nine years and a reward of pound;1,000 was offered for his capture. Cluny Castle was burned by Government troops, but was later rebuilt. In 1784, the estates, which had been forfeited, were restored but were sold on the death of the 17th chief. (view tartan)
MacPhie Ancient
The MacPhies, Sons of ldquo;The Dark One of Peace, are one of the several branches of Clan Alpine, descended from Kenneth MacAlpine, King of Scots. An older form of the name is MacDuffie, so written in a charter of 1463, from the Gaelic Mac-Dubh-Sithe. The Chiefs were Heriditary Keepers of the Records of the Isles and they were in possession of the Isle of Colonsay until, in 1615, Malcolm MacPhie joined John of Islay in his ill-fated rebellion. It was after the forfeiture of the Lords of the Isles that the MacPhies gave their allegiance to the Islay MacDonalds. After this misfortune, the MacPhies were a ldquo;broken clan. Some went to Lochaber and followed Lochiel, others settled round the Firth of Clyde, others again went to Ireland, where the name is sometimes found as MacAfie and MacCaffey. MacPhees from Lochaber will use the Cameron Badge of Oak but those who have no local allegiance will use the Pine of Clan Alpine. Another spelling is MacFie. (view tartan)
MacPhie Modern
The MacPhies, Sons of ldquo;The Dark One of Peace, are one of the several branches of Clan Alpine, descended from Kenneth MacAlpine, King of Scots. An older form of the name is MacDuffie, so written in a charter of 1463, from the Gaelic Mac-Dubh-Sithe. The Chiefs were Heriditary Keepers of the Records of the Isles and they were in possession of the Isle of Colonsay until, in 1615, Malcolm MacPhie joined John of Islay in his ill-fated rebellion. It was after the forfeiture of the Lords of the Isles that the MacPhies gave their allegiance to the Islay MacDonalds. After this misfortune, the MacPhies were a ldquo;broken clan. Some went to Lochaber and followed Lochiel, others settled round the Firth of Clyde, others again went to Ireland, where the name is sometimes found as MacAfie and MacCaffey. MacPhees from Lochaber will use the Cameron Badge of Oak but those who have no local allegiance will use the Pine of Clan Alpine. Another spelling is MacFie. (view tartan)
MacPhie Weathered
The MacPhies, Sons of ldquo;The Dark One of Peace, are one of the several branches of Clan Alpine, descended from Kenneth MacAlpine, King of Scots. An older form of the name is MacDuffie, so written in a charter of 1463, from the Gaelic Mac-Dubh-Sithe. The Chiefs were Heriditary Keepers of the Records of the Isles and they were in possession of the Isle of Colonsay until, in 1615, Malcolm MacPhie joined John of Islay in his ill-fated rebellion. It was after the forfeiture of the Lords of the Isles that the MacPhies gave their allegiance to the Islay MacDonalds. After this misfortune, the MacPhies were a ldquo;broken clan. Some went to Lochaber and followed Lochiel, others settled round the Firth of Clyde, others again went to Ireland, where the name is sometimes found as MacAfie and MacCaffey. MacPhees from Lochaber will use the Cameron Badge of Oak but those who have no local allegiance will use the Pine of Clan Alpine. Another spelling is MacFie. (view tartan)
MacQuarrie Ancient
Ulva and part of Mull was the ancient home of this clan. Originally vassals of the Lord of the Isles, they later followed MacLean of Duart. They were not a numerous clan and received a severe blow when their chief, Allan MacQuarrie, and most of the clansmen, were killed at the Battle of Inverkeithing in 1651. Lachlan MacQuarrie, 16th of Ulva, had to sell this estates. In 1788, at the age of 73, he entered the army. He died in 1818, at the age of 103. His cousin, Major General Lachlan MacQuarrie, who was Governor of New South Wales, was highly popular and MacQuarrie Island, in the Pacific, was named after him. Badge-Pine. (view tartan)
MacQuarrie Modern
Ulva and part of Mull was the ancient home of this clan. Originally vassals of the Lord of the Isles, they later followed MacLean of Duart. They were not a numerous clan and received a severe blow when their chief, Allan MacQuarrie, and most of the clansmen, were killed at the Battle of Inverkeithing in 1651. Lachlan MacQuarrie, 16th of Ulva, had to sell this estates. In 1788, at the age of 73, he entered the army. He died in 1818, at the age of 103. His cousin, Major General Lachlan MacQuarrie, who was Governor of New South Wales, was highly popular and MacQuarrie Island, in the Pacific, was named after him. Badge-Pine. (view tartan)
MacQueen Ancient
Of West Highland origin, the MacQueens appear to have associated themselves with the Clan Donald. During the 13th century they were in Argyllshire and later, in Skye and Lewis. A number of Hebridean MacQueens settled in Strathdearn and became septs of Clan Chattan. They possessed Corryburgh in the 16th century and appear to have been quite strong at this time. Corryburgh passed out of their possession in the 18th century. Donald MacQueen was Sheriff Substitute of Inverness in the 18th century. Robert McQueen, the well-known lawyer, who became Lord Braxfield, belonged to a Lanarkshire family of MacQueens. (view tartan)
MacQueen Modern
Of West Highland origin, the MacQueens appear to have associated themselves with the Clan Donald. During the 13th century they were in Argyllshire and later, in Skye and Lewis. A number of Hebridean MacQueens settled in Strathdearn and became septs of Clan Chattan. They possessed Corryburgh in the 16th century and appear to have been quite strong at this time. Corryburgh passed out of their possession in the 18th century. Donald MacQueen was Sheriff Substitute of Inverness in the 18th century. Robert McQueen, the well-known lawyer, who became Lord Braxfield, belonged to a Lanarkshire family of MacQueens. (view tartan)
MacRae Clan Ancient
The tartan called MacRae of Conchra is said to have been in the possession of that family since 1715. During the Jacobite Rising fo 1715, John MacRae of Conchra and Lochalsh left Kintail with his followers to join the rebel army. Some of his men had worn out their hose and were given a web of tartan cloth by people living in a shieling where they rested during their march. With this the men made themselves new hose. The tartan thus supplied was now well-known MacRae of Conchra tartan. Part of the original web was long in the possession of the Conchra family. The tartan is sometimes called Sheriffmuir tartan. (view tartan)
MacRae Clan Modern
The tartan called MacRae of Conchra is said to have been in the possession of that family since 1715. During the Jacobite Rising fo 1715, John MacRae of Conchra and Lochalsh left Kintail with his followers to join the rebel army. Some of his men had worn out their hose and were given a web of tartan cloth by people living in a shieling where they rested during their march. With this the men made themselves new hose. The tartan thus supplied was now well-known MacRae of Conchra tartan. Part of the original web was long in the possession of the Conchra family. The tartan is sometimes called Sheriffmuir tartan. (view tartan)
MacRae Dress Modern
Kintail, to which they are said to have migrated in the 14th century, is the home of the MacRaes. They supported the MacKenzies and were Chamberlains of Kintail and Constables of Eilean Donan Castle. The MacRaes were Jacobites and served the Royal Stuarts faithfully and well. Duncan MacRae, 5th of Kintail, received the lands of Inverinate about 1557. At the Battle of Sheriffmuir, in 1715, their bravery was outstanding and many of the leading men were killed. The Fernaig Manuscript (1688ndash;1693), which was compiled by Duncan MacRae of Inverinate, is a valuable contribution to Gaelic literature. (view tartan)
MacRae Hunting Ancient
Kintail, to which they are said to have migrated in the 14th century, is the home of the MacRaes. They supported the MacKenzies and were Chamberlains of Kintail and Constables of Eilean Donan Castle. The MacRaes were Jacobites and served the Royal Stuarts faithfully and well. Duncan MacRae, 5th of Kintail, received the lands of Inverinate about 1557. At the Battle of Sheriffmuir, in 1715, their bravery was outstanding and many of the leading men were killed. The Fernaig Manuscript (1688ndash;1693), which was compiled by Duncan MacRae of Inverinate, is a valuable contribution to Gaelic literature. (view tartan)
MacRae Hunting Modern
Kintail, to which they are said to have migrated in the 14th century, is the home of the MacRaes. They supported the MacKenzies and were Chamberlains of Kintail and Constables of Eilean Donan Castle. The MacRaes were Jacobites and served the Royal Stuarts faithfully and well. Duncan MacRae, 5th of Kintail, received the lands of Inverinate about 1557. At the Battle of Sheriffmuir, in 1715, their bravery was outstanding and many of the leading men were killed. The Fernaig Manuscript (1688ndash;1693), which was compiled by Duncan MacRae of Inverinate, is a valuable contribution to Gaelic literature. (view tartan)
MacRae Hunting Weathered
Kintail, to which they are said to have migrated in the 14th century, is the home of the MacRaes. They supported the MacKenzies and were Chamberlains of Kintail and Constables of Eilean Donan Castle. The MacRaes were Jacobites and served the Royal Stuarts faithfully and well. Duncan MacRae, 5th of Kintail, received the lands of Inverinate about 1557. At the Battle of Sheriffmuir, in 1715, their bravery was outstanding and many of the leading men were killed. The Fernaig Manuscript (1688ndash;1693), which was compiled by Duncan MacRae of Inverinate, is a valuable contribution to Gaelic literature. (view tartan)
MacRae Of Conchra Ancient
Kintail, to which they are said to have migrated in the 14th century, is the home of the MacRaes. They supported the MacKenzies and were Chamberlains of Kintail and Constables of Eilean Donan Castle. The MacRaes were Jacobites and served the Royal Stuarts faithfully and well. Duncan MacRae, 5th of Kintail, received the lands of Inverinate about 1557. At the Battle of Sheriffmuir, in 1715, their bravery was outstanding and many of the leading men were killed. The Fernaig Manuscript (1688ndash;1693), which was compiled by Duncan MacRae of Inverinate, is a valuable contribution to Gaelic literature. (view tartan)
MacTaggart Ancient
This name has an ecclesiastical origin and in Gaelic is called Mac-an-t-sagairt, meaning quot;son of the priestquot;. Up to the beginning of the 12th century priests, in minor orders, were permitted to marry. Ferchar MacKinsagart, son of the Red Priest of Applecross, was knighted by King Alexander II in 1215 for his services in helping to suppress an uprising in the ancient Province of Moray. The name is found in many parts of Scotland, including Galloway and Argyll. Badges - Reed Grass, Great Bulrush. (view tartan)
MacTavish Ancient
The name is derived from the Gaelic name MacTamhais, meaning quot;son of Thomasquot;. In the Lowlands the name takes the form of Thomson. The MacTavishes were numerous in Argyllshire, where the Clan Tavish of Dunardarie are said to have an ancient origin. There were MacTavishes in Stratherrick, Inverness-shire, who are claimed as septs of the Frasers of Lovat. The MacThomases of Glenhee, who are mentioned in the roll of the Clans in 1587, have a different origin. They were attached to the Clan Chattan. (view tartan)
MacTavish Modern
The name is derived from the Gaelic name MacTamhais, meaning quot;son of Thomasquot;. In the Lowlands the name takes the form of Thomson. The MacTavishes were numerous in Argyllshire, where the Clan Tavish of Dunardarie are said to have an ancient origin. There were MacTavishes in Stratherrick, Inverness-shire, who are claimed as septs of the Frasers of Lovat. The MacThomases of Glenhee, who are mentioned in the roll of the Clans in 1587, have a different origin. They were attached to the Clan Chattan. (view tartan)
MacThomas Ancient
This small clan, which is named in the list of clans which made up the Confederation of Clan Chattan, was, according to tradition, founded by Thomas, younger and natural son of the 6th Chief of Clan Mackintosh. The best known of their Chiefs was John Mtilde;r, who used the name MacComy, as an English form of the pronunciation in Gaelic of MacThomais. There were other MacThomases, descended from one who called himself Thomas MacCoinnich (Thomas, son of Kenneth), who were in Glen Shee in Perthshire in 1587, appearing in a Roll of the Clans of that date as Clan MacThomas in Glenshee. They frequently took the name of MacCombie. They were regarded as a sept of the Mackintoshes, though one school of thought has them as a branch of the MacKenzies: perhaps because of the Coinnich in their Gaelic patronymic. (view tartan)
Malcolm Ancient
Argyllshire is the home of this clan, and the name Malcolm is the English equivalent of the Gaelic Callum. The lands of Craignish were given to Reginald MacCallum of Corbarron in 1414 together with the Constableship of the Castles of Lochaffy and Craignish. In the 17th century Corbarron was bequeathed to Zachary MacCallum of Poltalloch. The Poltalloch family possessed their lands prior to 1562. Dugald MacCallum of Poltalloch, who succeeded to the estate in 1779, is said to have been the first to adopt the name Malcolm. Badge - Mountain Ash. (view tartan)
Malcolm Modern
Argyllshire is the home of this clan, and the name Malcolm is the English equivalent of the Gaelic Callum. The lands of Craignish were given to Reginald MacCallum of Corbarron in 1414 together with the Constableship of the Castles of Lochaffy and Craignish. In the 17th century Corbarron was bequeathed to Zachary MacCallum of Poltalloch. The Poltalloch family possessed their lands prior to 1562. Dugald MacCallum of Poltalloch, who succeeded to the estate in 1779, is said to have been the first to adopt the name Malcolm. Badge - Mountain Ash. (view tartan)
Maple Leaf
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Marr Green Ancient
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Marr Green Modern
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Marshall Ancient
This name means quot;horse servantquot; and may, probably, be interpreted as quot;farrierquot;. It is believed to have been introduced to Britain at the time of the Norman Conquest. It is on record in Scotland in the 12th century. The name is found in Aberdeenshire at an early date, also in Glasgow and St. Andrews. In the process of time the office of Marshal became one of great dignity. (view tartan)
Marshall Modern
This name means quot;horse servantquot; and may, probably, be interpreted as quot;farrierquot;. It is believed to have been introduced to Britain at the time of the Norman Conquest. It is on record in Scotland in the 12th century. The name is found in Aberdeenshire at an early date, also in Glasgow and St. Andrews. In the process of time the office of Marshal became one of great dignity. (view tartan)
Matheson Hunting Ancient
This clan is reported to have had 2,000 fighting men in 1427. The two main branches were Matheson of Shiness, in Sutherland, and Matheson of Lochalsh. Donald, of the Lochalsh branch, was Constable of Eilean Donan Castle in 1539. There were other notable branches, including Bennetsfield in the Black Isle, Ross-shire. The estate of Attadale was purchased by John Matheson of Lochalsh in 1730. Sir Alexander Matheson, of the Lochalsh branch, became 1st Baronet of Lochalsh in 1882. He made a considerable fortune in the East. He bought estates in Ross-shire and spent almost one million pounds on their purchase and improvement. (view tartan)
Matheson Hunting Modern
This clan is reported to have had 2,000 fighting men in 1427. The two main branches were Matheson of Shiness, in Sutherland, and Matheson of Lochalsh. Donald, of the Lochalsh branch, was Constable of Eilean Donan Castle in 1539. There were other notable branches, including Bennetsfield in the Black Isle, Ross-shire. The estate of Attadale was purchased by John Matheson of Lochalsh in 1730. Sir Alexander Matheson, of the Lochalsh branch, became 1st Baronet of Lochalsh in 1882. He made a considerable fortune in the East. He bought estates in Ross-shire and spent almost one million pounds on their purchase and improvement. (view tartan)
Matheson Red Ancient
This clan is reported to have had 2,000 fighting men in 1427. The two main branches were Matheson of Shiness, in Sutherland, and Matheson of Lochalsh. Donald, of the Lochalsh branch, was Constable of Eilean Donan Castle in 1539. There were other notable branches, including Bennetsfield in the Black Isle, Ross-shire. The estate of Attadale was purchased by John Matheson of Lochalsh in 1730. Sir Alexander Matheson, of the Lochalsh branch, became 1st Baronet of Lochalsh in 1882. He made a considerable fortune in the East. He bought estates in Ross-shire and spent almost one million pounds on their purchase and improvement. (view tartan)
Matheson Red Modern
This clan is reported to have had 2,000 fighting men in 1427. The two main branches were Matheson of Shiness, in Sutherland, and Matheson of Lochalsh. Donald, of the Lochalsh branch, was Constable of Eilean Donan Castle in 1539. There were other notable branches, including Bennetsfield in the Black Isle, Ross-shire. The estate of Attadale was purchased by John Matheson of Lochalsh in 1730. Sir Alexander Matheson, of the Lochalsh branch, became 1st Baronet of Lochalsh in 1882. He made a considerable fortune in the East. He bought estates in Ross-shire and spent almost one million pounds on their purchase and improvement. (view tartan)
Matheson Red Weathered
This clan is reported to have had 2,000 fighting men in 1427. The two main branches were Matheson of Shiness, in Sutherland, and Matheson of Lochalsh. Donald, of the Lochalsh branch, was Constable of Eilean Donan Castle in 1539. There were other notable branches, including Bennetsfield in the Black Isle, Ross-shire. The estate of Attadale was purchased by John Matheson of Lochalsh in 1730. Sir Alexander Matheson, of the Lochalsh branch, became 1st Baronet of Lochalsh in 1882. He made a considerable fortune in the East. He bought estates in Ross-shire and spent almost one million pounds on their purchase and improvement. (view tartan)
Maxwell Ancient
Sir Aymer Maxwell, brother of Sir James, Chamberlain of Scotland, who died in 1241, was the progenitor of this great Border family. Seven generations later, his descendant, Herbert, became Lord Maxwell. In this line, it was the 8th Lord who was created Earl of Nithsdale by Charles I. Loyal to the House of Stewart, the 5th Earl was out in The Fifteen. He was, however, captured and sentenced to death. From his prison in the Tower of London, he was most courageously rescued by his wife, who, dressing him in womans clothes, remained behind while he made his escape. He later died in Rome. Stemming from younger sons of the 13th century Sir Aymer come the Maxwells of Cardoners, of Springkell, of Pollock and the Earls of Farnham. (view tartan)
Maxwell Modern
Sir Aymer Maxwell, brother of Sir James, Chamberlain of Scotland, who died in 1241, was the progenitor of this great Border family. Seven generations later, his descendant, Herbert, became Lord Maxwell. In this line, it was the 8th Lord who was created Earl of Nithsdale by Charles I. Loyal to the House of Stewart, the 5th Earl was out in The Fifteen. He was, however, captured and sentenced to death. From his prison in the Tower of London, he was most courageously rescued by his wife, who, dressing him in womans clothes, remained behind while he made his escape. He later died in Rome. Stemming from younger sons of the 13th century Sir Aymer come the Maxwells of Cardoners, of Springkell, of Pollock and the Earls of Farnham. (view tartan)
Melville Ancient
This Norman name comes from the Barony of Malaville in the Pays de Caux. It appears in Scotland in a Charter of Malcolm IV, and again as the name of a witness to the transfer of the Church at Tarland to the Church of St. Andrews, during the reign of William the Lion. The earliest existing charter of the Burgh of Aberdeen has a Melville for witness. The family gave the name of Melville to those lands in Midlothian which were their earliest Scottish possession. One of the most outstanding Melvilles was James, the Reformer, who spelt his name both Melville and Melvin. Other forms are Maling, Malling, Melling and Mellin. Just before the Union, the old Scottish title of Earl of Melville was merged with that of Leven into the Earldom of Leven and Melville. (view tartan)
Menzies Black And White Modern
In the 13th century Robert de Menyers was Lord High Chamberlain, the Menzies possessed lands in Aberfeldy and Glendochart. They supported Robert the Bruce at the Battle of Bannockburn in 1314. David Menzies was Governor of Orkney and Shetland in 1423. Sir Robert de Menzies, in 1487, had his lands erected into a free barony. In 1665 Sir Alexander Menzies was created a Baronet of Nova Scotia. There are several important branches of this family. During the 1745 Jacobite Rising the chief did not take part, but his followers were in the Jacobite army under Menzies of Shian. (view tartan)
Menzies Green Ancient
In the 13th century Robert de Menyers was Lord High Chamberlain, the Menzies possessed lands in Aberfeldy and Glendochart. They supported Robert the Bruce at the Battle of Bannockburn in 1314. David Menzies was Governor of Orkney and Shetland in 1423. Sir Robert de Menzies, in 1487, had his lands erected into a free barony. In 1665 Sir Alexander Menzies was created a Baronet of Nova Scotia. There are several important branches of this family. During the 1745 Jacobite Rising the chief did not take part, but his followers were in the Jacobite army under Menzies of Shian. (view tartan)
Menzies Green Modern
In the 13th century Robert de Menyers was Lord High Chamberlain, the Menzies possessed lands in Aberfeldy and Glendochart. They supported Robert the Bruce at the Battle of Bannockburn in 1314. David Menzies was Governor of Orkney and Shetland in 1423. Sir Robert de Menzies, in 1487, had his lands erected into a free barony. In 1665 Sir Alexander Menzies was created a Baronet of Nova Scotia. There are several important branches of this family. During the 1745 Jacobite Rising the chief did not take part, but his followers were in the Jacobite army under Menzies of Shian. (view tartan)
Menzies Red And White Modern
In the 13th century Robert de Menyers was Lord High Chamberlain, the Menzies possessed lands in Aberfeldy and Glendochart. They supported Robert the Bruce at the Battle of Bannockburn in 1314. David Menzies was Governor of Orkney and Shetland in 1423. Sir Robert de Menzies, in 1487, had his lands erected into a free barony. In 1665 Sir Alexander Menzies was created a Baronet of Nova Scotia. There are several important branches of this family. During the 1745 Jacobite Rising the chief did not take part, but his followers were in the Jacobite army under Menzies of Shian. (view tartan)
Middleton Ancient
Middleton of Conveth, in the Parish of Laurencekirk, is the source of this name. Malcolm Middleton received a charter of the lands of Middleton from King WIlliam the Lion of Scotland. In 1660 a peerage was conferred on John Middleton of Caldhame as 1st Earl of Middleton and Lord Clermont and Fettercairn. He was a brave and capable soldier, and for his services in defeating Montrose he was awarded 25,000 meerks. His son, the 2nd Earl, was one of the principal Secretaries of State for Scotland in 1682. He was loyal to King James II and followed him to France. He was outlawed in 1694 and forfeited in 1695. (view tartan)
Mitchell Ancient
Mitchell is derived from the name Michael which was originally Hebrew but arrived in Scotland through France. In 1489 John Michell had a remission granted to him for his part in holding Dunbaron Castle against King James III. In Orkney, Michael as a forename is pronounced Mitchell and St. Michael's Church in Harray is known locally as St. Mitchell's Church. Andrew Mitchell, a Scot, was responsible for introducing the steam engine into Denmark in 1790. The tartan worn by the Mitchell's is also worn by the Russells, Galbraiths and Hunters but the reasons for this are obscure. (view tartan)
Mitchell Modern
Mitchell is derived from the name Michael which was originally Hebrew but arrived in Scotland through France. In 1489 John Michell had a remission granted to him for his part in holding Dunbaron Castle against King James III. In Orkney, Michael as a forename is pronounced Mitchell and St. Michael's Church in Harray is known locally as St. Mitchell's Church. Andrew Mitchell, a Scot, was responsible for introducing the steam engine into Denmark in 1790. The tartan worn by the Mitchell's is also worn by the Russells, Galbraiths and Hunters but the reasons for this are obscure. (view tartan)
Modern Scotland's National
Lochcarron of Scotland were proud to be involved in the design and development of the National Tartan which was commissioned by Philip King, Kiltmakers, of George Street, Aberdeen. The tartan was launched on St. Andrews Day 1993, creating considerable interest throughout the worldwide Scots community. Lochcarron has consequently been commissioned to provide the traditional range of produce in this most attractive tartan. (view tartan)
Moffat
All Moffats are descendants of an extremely ancient Border family. The oldest recorded ancestor is Andlaw, alias Allan, Grant who came to Scotland from Norway at some time in the 10th century. The family is pre-Conquest in origin and became ancient vassals of the Annans who held the Lordship of Annandale before the days of the Bruces. Very early in the 14th century, Robert de Brus, Lord of Annandale, granted the Moffats four charters of land in the Barony of Westerkirk for services to Wallace and to himself, and in 1342 the Moffats obtained the feu of the Grandtoun, or Granton, from the Douglas Lord of Annandale. (view tartan)
Montgomery Ancient
Roger de Montgomerie, born in Normandy about 1030 during the reign of MacBeth, became a joint-Regent of that Dukedom when William the Conqueror invaded England. He was later rewarded with several English earldoms and the naming of Montgomeryshire in his honour. His descendant Robert, who died in 1177, was the first of this family to establish himself in Scotland. In 1489, Sir Alexander of this line became Lord Montgomerie. From him come the Montgomeries of Skelmorlie. The 2nd Lord was created Earl of Eglinton in 1508. Montgomery of Stanhope descends from a younger brother of the 1st Lord. (view tartan)
Montgomery Blue Ancient
Roger de Montgomerie, born in Normandy about 1030 during the reign of MacBeth, became a joint-Regent of that Dukedom when William the Conqueror invaded England. He was later rewarded with several English earldoms and the naming of Montgomeryshire in his honour. His descendant Robert, who died in 1177, was the first of this family to establish himself in Scotland. In 1489, Sir Alexander of this line became Lord Montgomerie. From him come the Montgomeries of Skelmorlie. The 2nd Lord was created Earl of Eglinton in 1508. Montgomery of Stanhope descends from a younger brother of the 1st Lord. (view tartan)
Montgomery Blue Modern
Roger de Montgomerie, born in Normandy about 1030 during the reign of MacBeth, became a joint-Regent of that Dukedom when William the Conqueror invaded England. He was later rewarded with several English earldoms and the naming of Montgomeryshire in his honour. His descendant Robert, who died in 1177, was the first of this family to establish himself in Scotland. In 1489, Sir Alexander of this line became Lord Montgomerie. From him come the Montgomeries of Skelmorlie. The 2nd Lord was created Earl of Eglinton in 1508. Montgomery of Stanhope descends from a younger brother of the 1st Lord. (view tartan)
Montgomery Modern
Roger de Montgomerie, born in Normandy about 1030 during the reign of MacBeth, became a joint-Regent of that Dukedom when William the Conqueror invaded England. He was later rewarded with several English earldoms and the naming of Montgomeryshire in his honour. His descendant Robert, who died in 1177, was the first of this family to establish himself in Scotland. In 1489, Sir Alexander of this line became Lord Montgomerie. From him come the Montgomeries of Skelmorlie. The 2nd Lord was created Earl of Eglinton in 1508. Montgomery of Stanhope descends from a younger brother of the 1st Lord. (view tartan)
Morgan (MacKay Blue) Ancient
It seems that the Scottish Morgans were of the same race as the MacKays, descending from Morgund of Pluscarden, a cadet of the old Royal House of Moray. Those of the clan who went north under Malcolm IV became the MacKays. The name Morgan comes from the early Celtic ÒSea-BrightÓ and is found also in Cornish, Breton and Welsh. For a long time it was found in Scotland only in the north-east. Gradually then the Morgans spread south. Morgan of Glenesk in Forfarshire rendered homage in 1296. Later, Morgans were found all down the coast, including Fife. The British monk, Pelagius, who was responsible for the Pelagian Heresy, was called, in his own tongue, Morgan. (view tartan)
Morrison Green Ancient
The Morrisons were in Lewis and parts of the north-west Highlands at an early date. The office of brieve or judge was held by the Morrisons of Habost. The Morrisons on the mainland are said to have settled in Sutherland following a dispute with Torquil Dubh MacLeod in the 16th century. There were Morrisons in Perth, Stirling, and other parts of Scotland, but they do not appear to have been connected with the Lewis Morrisons. Another Morrison family, that of Bognie, were prominent in north-east Scotland. (view tartan)
Morrison Green Modern
The Morrisons were in Lewis and parts of the north-west Highlands at an early date. The office of brieve or judge was held by the Morrisons of Habost. The Morrisons on the mainland are said to have settled in Sutherland following a dispute with Torquil Dubh MacLeod in the 16th century. There were Morrisons in Perth, Stirling, and other parts of Scotland, but they do not appear to have been connected with the Lewis Morrisons. Another Morrison family, that of Bognie, were prominent in north-east Scotland. (view tartan)
Morrison Green Weathered
The Morrisons were in Lewis and parts of the north-west Highlands at an early date. The office of brieve or judge was held by the Morrisons of Habost. The Morrisons on the mainland are said to have settled in Sutherland following a dispute with Torquil Dubh MacLeod in the 16th century. There were Morrisons in Perth, Stirling, and other parts of Scotland, but they do not appear to have been connected with the Lewis Morrisons. Another Morrison family, that of Bognie, were prominent in north-east Scotland. (view tartan)
Morrison Red Ancient
The Morrisons were in Lewis and parts of the north-west Highlands at an early date. The office of brieve or judge was held by the Morrisons of Habost. The Morrisons on the mainland are said to have settled in Sutherland following a dispute with Torquil Dubh MacLeod in the 16th century. There were Morrisons in Perth, Stirling, and other parts of Scotland, but they do not appear to have been connected with the Lewis Morrisons. Another Morrison family, that of Bognie, were prominent in north-east Scotland. (view tartan)
Morrison Red Modern
The Morrisons were in Lewis and parts of the north-west Highlands at an early date. The office of brieve or judge was held by the Morrisons of Habost. The Morrisons on the mainland are said to have settled in Sutherland following a dispute with Torquil Dubh MacLeod in the 16th century. There were Morrisons in Perth, Stirling, and other parts of Scotland, but they do not appear to have been connected with the Lewis Morrisons. Another Morrison family, that of Bognie, were prominent in north-east Scotland (view tartan)
Mowat Ancient
Believed to be of Norman origin the Mowats settled in Scotland in the 12th century. They acquired lands of Ferne, in Angus, during the reign of King William the Lion and rose to high positions. Some of the name are found in the Highlands and in Orkney and Shetland. Mowat of Buchally, in Aberdeenshire, received a charter of Freswick in Caithness from Robert the Bruce in 1312. This family, or people of the name, were found in many parts of Scotland, including the Lothians, Ayrshire, and Cromarty. The northern Mowats appear to have been septs of Clan Sutherland. (view tartan)
Muir Ancient
The rather unusual Muir tartan can be traced back to 1930 and can be worn by many variations of the name including More, Moir and Moore. Sir Adam Mure married Joanna Danzielstour and gave birth to Elizabeth future Queen to Robert II, grandson of Robert the Bruce. Robert being the first of the Stewart dynasty which reigned over Scotland amp; England. A later royal connection occurred when their daughter Joanna, married Sir John Lyon, Thane of Glamis, from whom descended the Earls of Strathmore amp; Kinghorne, forbearers of the late Queen Mother and her daughter Queen Elizabeth II. In 1700 the Chief of of the Muir clan died without a male heir. This resulted in a dispersal of the clan with two prominent sections linked to Clan Grant from 1770 and the other descending from a marriage of a More Heiress to a Leslie Chief in 1200. Many others were absorbed into major clans such as Gordon, Campbell, Donald and Stewarts. In 1999 a Clan Muir Society was formed in Ayrshire by Kurt Muir and Andrew Moore was elected Chief of the House of Muir. The Society maintains an active website. (view tartan)
Muir Modern
The rather unusual Muir tartan can be traced back to 1930 and can be worn by many variations of the name including More, Moir and Moore. Sir Adam Mure married Joanna Danzielstour and gave birth to Elizabeth future Queen to Robert II, grandson of Robert the Bruce. Robert being the first of the Stewart dynasty which reigned over Scotland amp; England. A later royal connection occurred when their daughter Joanna, married Sir John Lyon, Thane of Glamis, from whom descended the Earls of Strathmore amp; Kinghorne, forbearers of the late Queen Mother and her daughter Queen Elizabeth II In 1700 the Chief of of the Muir clan died without a male heir. This resulted in a dispersal of the clan with two prominent sections linked to Clan Grant from 1770 and the other descending from a marriage of a More Heiress to a Leslie Chief in 1200. Many others were absorbed into major clans such as Gordon, Campbell, Donald and Stewarts. In 1999 a Clan Muir Society was formed in Ayrshire by Kurt Muir and Andrew Moore was elected Chief of the House of Muir. The Society maintains an active website. (view tartan)
Munro Ancient
The Munroes possessed lands in Easter Ross in the 12th century and the chief was known as Munro of Foulis. They were at the Battle of Bannockburn in 1314. They were followers of the old Earls of Ross. Numerically strong, they were important in their Highland District, and in the 17th century their military spirit found outlet in the Continental War, where they served under their chief, Sir Robert Munro, called the quot;Black Baronquot;. At that time 27 field officers and 11 captains, all Munroes, served in these wars. In 1634 Hector Munro of Foulis was created a Baronet of Nova Scotia. (view tartan)
Munro Hunting Ancient
The Munroes possessed lands in Easter Ross in the 12th century and the chief was known as Munro of Foulis. They were at the Battle of Bannockburn in 1314. They were followers of the old Earls of Ross. Numerically strong, they were important in their Highland District, and in the 17th century their military spirit found outlet in the Continental War, where they served under their chief, Sir Robert Munro, called the quot;Black Baronquot;. At that time 27 field officers and 11 captains, all Munroes, served in these wars. In 1634 Hector Munro of Foulis was created a Baronet of Nova Scotia. (view tartan)
Munro Hunting Modern
The Munroes possessed lands in Easter Ross in the 12th century and the chief was known as Munro of Foulis. They were at the Battle of Bannockburn in 1314. They were followers of the old Earls of Ross. Numerically strong, they were important in their Highland District, and in the 17th century their military spirit found outlet in the Continental War, where they served under their chief, Sir Robert Munro, called the quot;Black Baronquot;. At that time 27 field officers and 11 captains, all Munroes, served in these wars. In 1634 Hector Munro of Foulis was created a Baronet of Nova Scotia. (view tartan)
Munro Hunting Weathered
The Munroes possessed lands in Easter Ross in the 12th century and the chief was known as Munro of Foulis. They were at the Battle of Bannockburn in 1314. They were followers of the old Earls of Ross. Numerically strong, they were important in their Highland District, and in the 17th century their military spirit found outlet in the Continental War, where they served under their chief, Sir Robert Munro, called the quot;Black Baronquot;. At that time 27 field officers and 11 captains, all Munroes, served in these wars. In 1634 Hector Munro of Foulis was created a Baronet of Nova Scotia. (view tartan)
Munro Modern
The Munroes possessed lands in Easter Ross in the 12th century and the chief was known as Munro of Foulis. They were at the Battle of Bannockburn in 1314. They were followers of the old Earls of Ross. Numerically strong, they were important in their Highland District, and in the 17th century their military spirit found outlet in the Continental War, where they served under their chief, Sir Robert Munro, called the quot;Black Baronquot;. At that time 27 field officers and 11 captains, all Munroes, served in these wars. In 1634 Hector Munro of Foulis was created a Baronet of Nova Scotia. (view tartan)
Munro Weathered
The Munroes possessed lands in Easter Ross in the 12th century and the chief was known as Munro of Foulis. They were at the Battle of Bannockburn in 1314. They were followers of the old Earls of Ross. Numerically strong, they were important in their Highland District, and in the 17th century their military spirit found outlet in the Continental War, where they served under their chief, Sir Robert Munro, called the quot;Black Baronquot;. At that time 27 field officers and 11 captains, all Munroes, served in these wars. In 1634 Hector Munro of Foulis was created a Baronet of Nova Scotia. (view tartan)
Murray of Atholl Ancient
The Murrays of Tullibardine acquired their lands in 1283, and in 1606 the 12th Chief of Tullibardine became an Earl. His son became Earl of Atholl in 1629, and the 2nd Earl was raised to Marquis in 1676. In 1703 the Dukedom of Atholl was conferred on the 2nd Marquis.Freskin, one of the Celtic chiefs of the ancient Province of Moray, was the ancestor of the Murrays. William, described as quot;de Moraviaquot;, acquired lands in the Lowlands, including Bothwell. Sir Andrew, of Bothwell, supported William Wallace and was Regent after the death of King Robert I. From him descended the Murrays of Tullibardine. The Murrays were powerful and had many important branches. They supported the Royal Stewarts. The Murrays of Tullibardine acquired their lands in 1283, and in 1606 the 12th Chief of Tullibardine became an Earl. His son became Earl of Atholl in 1629, and the 2nd Earl was raised to Marquis in 1676. In 1703 the Dukedom of Atholl was conferred on the 2nd Marquis. Badges - Juniper, Broom. (view tartan)
Murray of Atholl Modern
Freskin, one of the Celtic chiefs of the ancient Province of Moray, was the ancestor of the Murrays. William, described as quot;de Moraviaquot;, acquired lands in the Lowlands, including Bothwell. Sir Andrew, of Bothwell, supported William Wallace and was Regent after the death of King Robert I. From him descended the Murrays of Tullibardine. The Murrays were powerful and had many important branches. They supported the Royal Stewarts. The Murrays of Tullibardine acquired their lands in 1283, and in 1606 the 12th Chief of Tullibardine became an Earl. His son became Earl of Atholl in 1629, and the 2nd Earl was raised to Marquis in 1676. In 1703 the Dukedom of Atholl was conferred on the 2nd Marquis. Badges - Juniper, Broom. (view tartan)
Murray of Atholl Weathered
Freskin, one of the Celtic chiefs of the ancient Province of Moray, was the ancestor of the Murrays. William, described as ldquo;de Moravia, acquired lands in the Lowlands, including Bothwell. Sir Andrew, of Bothwell, supported William Wallace and was Regent after the death of King Robert I. From him descended the Murrays of Tullibardine. The Murrays were powerful and had many important branches. They supported the Royal Stewarts. The Murrays of Tullibardine acquired their lands in 1283, and in 1606 the 12th Chief of Tullibardine became an Earl. His son became Earl of Atholl in 1629, and the 2nd Earl was raised to Marquis in 1676. In 1703 the Dukedom of Atholl was conferred on the 2nd Marquis. (view tartan)
Murray Of Elibank Ancient
Freskin, one of the Celtic chiefs of the ancient Province of Moray, was the ancestor of the Murrays. William, described as ldquo;de Moravia, acquired lands in the Lowlands, including Bothwell. Sir Andrew, of Bothwell, supported William Wallace and was Regent after the death of King Robert I. From him descended the Murrays of Tullibardine. The Murrays were powerful and had many important branches. They supported the Royal Stewarts. The Murrays of Tullibardine acquired their lands in 1283, and in 1606 the 12th Chief of Tullibardine became an Earl. His son became Earl of Atholl in 1629, and the 2nd Earl was raised to Marquis in 1676. In 1703 the Dukedom of Atholl was conferred on the 2nd Marquis. (view tartan)
Murray Of Tullibardin Ancient
Freskin, one of the Celtic chiefs of the ancient Province of Moray, was the ancestor of the Murrays. William, described as ldquo;de Moravia, acquired lands in the Lowlands, including Bothwell. Sir Andrew, of Bothwell, supported William Wallace and was Regent after the death of King Robert I. From him descended the Murrays of Tullibardine. The Murrays were powerful and had many important branches. They supported the Royal Stewarts. The Murrays of Tullibardine acquired their lands in 1283, and in 1606 the 12th Chief of Tullibardine became an Earl. His son became Earl of Atholl in 1629, and the 2nd Earl was raised to Marquis in 1676. In 1703 the Dukedom of Atholl was conferred on the 2nd Marquis. (view tartan)
Murray Of Tullibardin Modern
Freskin, one of the Celtic chiefs of the ancient Province of Moray, was the ancestor of the Murrays. William, described as ldquo;de Moravia, acquired lands in the Lowlands, including Bothwell. Sir Andrew, of Bothwell, supported William Wallace and was Regent after the death of King Robert I. From him descended the Murrays of Tullibardine. The Murrays were powerful and had many important branches. They supported the Royal Stewarts. The Murrays of Tullibardine acquired their lands in 1283, and in 1606 the 12th Chief of Tullibardine became an Earl. His son became Earl of Atholl in 1629, and the 2nd Earl was raised to Marquis in 1676. In 1703 the Dukedom of Atholl was conferred on the 2nd Marquis. (view tartan)
Murray of Tullibardin Weathered
Freskin, one of the Celtic chiefs of the ancient Province of Moray, was the ancestor of the Murrays. William, described as ldquo;de Moravia, acquired lands in the Lowlands, including Bothwell. Sir Andrew, of Bothwell, supported William Wallace and was Regent after the death of King Robert I. From him descended the Murrays of Tullibardine. The Murrays were powerful and had many important branches. They supported the Royal Stewarts. The Murrays of Tullibardine acquired their lands in 1283, and in 1606 the 12th Chief of Tullibardine became an Earl. His son became Earl of Atholl in 1629, and the 2nd Earl was raised to Marquis in 1676. In 1703 the Dukedom of Atholl was conferred on the 2nd Marquis. (view tartan)
Napier Ancient
First mentioned in the 12th century, the Nisbets appear to have taken their name from the old Barony of Nesbit, in Edrom Parish, in Berwickshire. They appear to have remained in the Border counties for several generations, but later some Nisbets were in other parts of Scotland. There were Nisbets in Sweden in the 16th century. Among the outstanding Nisbets were the well-known heraldic author, Alexander Nisbet, and James Nisbet, the translator of the New Testament into Scots. (view tartan)
Napier Modern
The Napiers claim to be descended from the old Earls of Lennox and there is evidence they possessed lands in the County of Dumbarton in the 13th century. A traditional tale claims that for heroism in a battle one of the sons of the Earl of Lennox was given the lands of Gosford in Fife by the Scottish King, who renamed him Napier. The family has a fine record of service in the defence of Scotland and in their loyalty to the Crown. Archibald Napier, whose father was killed at the Battle of Pinkie, in 1547, was knighted in 1567. His son, John was the inventor of logarithms. In 1627 the title of Baron Napier of Merchison was conferred on Sir Acrhibald Napier, the loyal supporter of King Charles I. (view tartan)
National Millennium
This tartan was created by the National Association of Scottish Woollen Manufacturers in the mid 1930s. For some reason it did not receive much exposure, perhaps because of the approach of World War 11, when only essential fabrics for military use and a restriction of colours in 'utility' cloths were instigated along with rationing in June 1941. Lochcarron, on discovering this dormant design, decided to re-launch it, in celebration of the 2000 Millennium. This made a considerable impact from Scotland to the Americas and the Far East, with many celebrities, including the family pipe band of film star Ewan Macgregor, adopting this vibrant tartan. Now that the new millennium is well established Lochcarron have restored the original name giving the design a deserved permanent place in the their collection of tartans. (view tartan)
Navy Granite
From the Highland Granite Wedding Collection - Available in 5 colours - Heavy Weight Tartan,grey tartan,grey plaid, (view tartan)
New York City
This tartan has been created to celebrate Tartan Day 6th April 2002 in New York City on the occasion of the greatest parade of Pipes amp; Drums yet seen. The tartan depicts the colourings of the streets and buildings of the city, with the green section representing Central Park. The two black stripes are to honour the memory of the twin towers of the World Trade Center, with the blue section recognising the island of Manhattan surrounded by the Hudson amp; East rivers. It is no accident that these colours also depict those worn by the Celtic nations represented in the world wide pipe band fraternity participating in Tunes of Glory in New York City and significantly the gold/brown stripe also recognises the involvement of the American Gildas Club Cancer Charity, who with the Marie Curie Cancer Fund in the U.K. will be the major recipients of the funds raised by the event. (view tartan)
Nicolson Ancient
Skye is said to be the original home of this family, who owned Scorrybreac at an early period. In 1263, Sir Andrew Nicolson, a Danish knight, commanded one of King Haco's ships at the Battle of Largs. In the Highlands the name was MacNeacail, but this has, latterly, become MacNicol. Nicolsons and MacNicols are found in Argyllshire and elsewhere in Scotland. The Nicolsons of Scorrybreac were the principal family and a baronetcy was conferred in 1629. They took an important part in the affairs of the Island of Skye. (view tartan)
Nicolson Hunting Ancient
Skye is said to be the original home of this family, who owned Scorrybreac at an early period. In 1263, Sir Andrew Nicolson, a Danish knight, commanded one of King Haco's ships at the Battle of Largs. In the Highlands the name was MacNeacail, but this has, latterly, become MacNicol. Nicolsons and MacNicols are found in Argyllshire and elsewhere in Scotland. The Nicolsons of Scorrybreac were the principal family and a baronetcy was conferred in 1629. They took an important part in the affairs of the Island of Skye. (view tartan)
Nicolson Hunting Weathered
Skye is said to be the original home of this family, who owned Scorrybreac at an early period. In 1263, Sir Andrew Nicolson, a Danish knight, commanded one of King Haco's ships at the Battle of Largs. In the Highlands the name was MacNeacail, but this has, latterly, become MacNicol. Nicolsons and MacNicols are found in Argyllshire and elsewhere in Scotland. The Nicolsons of Scorrybreac were the principal family and a baronetcy was conferred in 1629. They took an important part in the affairs of the Island of Skye. (view tartan)
Nicolson Modern
Skye is said to be the original home of this family, who owned Scorrybreac at an early period. In 1263, Sir Andrew Nicolson, a Danish knight, commanded one of King Haco's ships at the Battle of Largs. In the Highlands the name was MacNeacail, but this has, latterly, become MacNicol. Nicolsons and MacNicols are found in Argyllshire and elsewhere in Scotland. The Nicolsons of Scorrybreac were the principal family and a baronetcy was conferred in 1629. They took an important part in the affairs of the Island of Skye. (view tartan)
Nicolson Weathered
Skye is said to be the original home of this family, who owned Scorrybreac at an early period. In 1263, Sir Andrew Nicolson, a Danish knight, commanded one of King Haco's ships at the Battle of Largs. In the Highlands the name was MacNeacail, but this has, latterly, become MacNicol. Nicolsons and MacNicols are found in Argyllshire and elsewhere in Scotland. The Nicolsons of Scorrybreac were the principal family and a baronetcy was conferred in 1629. They took an important part in the affairs of the Island of Skye. (view tartan)
Nisbet Ancient
First mentioned in the 12th century, the Nisbets appear to have taken their name from the old Barony of Nesbit, in Edrom Parish, in Berwickshire. They appear to have remained in the Border counties for several generations, but later some Nisbets were in other parts of Scotland. There were Nisbets in Sweden in the 16th century. Among the outstanding Nisbets were the well-known heraldic author, Alexander Nisbet, and James Nisbet, the translator of the New Testament into Scots. (view tartan)
Nisbet Modern
First mentioned in the 12th century, the Nisbets appear to have taken their name from the old Barony of Nesbit, in Edrom Parish, in Berwickshire. They appear to have remained in the Border counties for several generations, but later some Nisbets were in other parts of Scotland. There were Nisbets in Sweden in the 16th century. Among the outstanding Nisbets were the well-known heraldic author, Alexander Nisbet, and James Nisbet, the translator of the New Testament into Scots. (view tartan)
Ogilvie Hunting Ancient
The Ogilvies descend from Gilbert, son of the 1st Earl of Angus, who had a charter to the barony of Ogilvie in Forfarshire in the 12th century. The founder of the Airlie branch was Sir Walter Ogilvie of Lintrathan, whose son held the lands of Airlie by a charter of 1459. The 8th Lord of Ogilvie was elevated to Earl of Airlie in 1639. The Ogilvies of Airlie were loyal to the Royal House of Stewart and suffered in their cause. They took an active part in the Jacobite Risings of 1715 and 1745. Airlie was attainted, but a pardon was granted in 1778. The Earldom was restored in 1826. (view tartan)
Ogilvie Hunting Modern
The Ogilvies descend from Gilbert, son of the 1st Earl of Angus, who had a charter to the barony of Ogilvie in Forfarshire in the 12th century. The founder of the Airlie branch was Sir Walter Ogilvie of Lintrathan, whose son held the lands of Airlie by a charter of 1459. The 8th Lord of Ogilvie was elevated to Earl of Airlie in 1639. The Ogilvies of Airlie were loyal to the Royal House of Stewart and suffered in their cause. They took an active part in the Jacobite Risings of 1715 and 1745. Airlie was attainted, but a pardon was granted in 1778. The Earldom was restored in 1826. (view tartan)
Ogilvie Old Ancient
The Ogilvies descend from Gilbert, son of the 1st Earl of Angus, who had a charter to the barony of Ogilvie in Forfarshire in the 12th century. The founder of the Airlie branch was Sir Walter Ogilvie of Lintrathan, whose son held the lands of Airlie by a charter of 1459. The 8th Lord of Ogilvie was elevated to Earl of Airlie in 1639. The Ogilvies of Airlie were loyal to the Royal House of Stewart and suffered in their cause. They took an active part in the Jacobite Risings of 1715 and 1745. Airlie was attainted, but a pardon was granted in 1778. The Earldom was restored in 1826. (view tartan)
Oliphant Ancient
The progenitor of the Oliphants, David de Olifard, accompanied King David I to Scotland in 1141. In 1458 the title of Lord Oliphant was conferred on his descendant. The Oliphants of Gask, who descend from the second son of the 1st Lord Oliphant, were ardent Jacobites. Lady Nairn, the celebrated Scottish poetess, was a member of the Gask family. She was named Carolina, in honour of Prince Charlie. The name is of Norman origin and took many forms, including Olyfard, Olifarth, Olyfaunt and Olyphard. In early tartan collections the tartan was named quot;Oliphant and Melvillequot;. (view tartan)
Oliphant Modern
The progenitor of the Oliphants, David de Olifard, accompanied King David I to Scotland in 1141. In 1458 the title of Lord Oliphant was conferred on his descendant. The Oliphants of Gask, who descend from the second son of the 1st Lord Oliphant, were ardent Jacobites. Lady Nairn, the celebrated Scottish poetess, was a member of the Gask family. She was named Carolina, in honour of Prince Charlie. The name is of Norman origin and took many forms, including Olyfard, Olifarth, Olyfaunt and Olyphard. In early tartan collections the tartan was named quot;Oliphant and Melvillequot;. (view tartan)
Paisley Ancient
(view tartan)
Patriot Ancient
Lochcarron Highlander Division, is adding a new National tartan to their collection. This tartan is designed to appeal tothose proud of their Scottish connections. The tartan is an exciting addition to our range of contemporary dramatic colourings, from black through to granite, which are greatly sought after to celebrate social occasions throughout the Scottish Diaspora. The tartan has been registered with the Patent Office in order the purchaser the assurance and satisfaction of wearing a tartan that has been created and woven in Scotland to a standard in keeping with Lochcarron amp; Scotland's reputation. It is no accident that there is a definite influence from the Greatest Patriot after Wallace amp; Bruce. He died in attempting to take the heart of Bruce to the Holy Land. (view tartan)
Patriot Modern
Lochcarron Highlander Division, is adding a new National tartan to their collection. This tartan is designed to appeal tothose proud of their Scottish connections. The tartan is an exciting addition to our range of contemporary dramatic colourings, from black through to granite, which are greatly sought after to celebrate social occasions throughout the Scottish Diaspora. The tartan has been registered with the Patent Office in order the purchaser the assurance and satisfaction of wearing a tartan that has been created and woven in Scotland to a standard in keeping with Lochcarron amp; Scotland's reputation. It is no accident that there is a definite influence from the Greatest Patriot after Wallace amp; Bruce. He died in attempting to take the heart of Bruce to the Holy Land. (view tartan)
Patriot Weathered
Lochcarron Highlander Division, is adding a new National tartan to their collection. This tartan is designed to appeal tothose proud of their Scottish connections. The tartan is an exciting addition to our range of contemporary dramatic colourings, from black through to granite, which are greatly sought after to celebrate social occasions throughout the Scottish Diaspora. The tartan has been registered with the Patent Office in order the purchaser the assurance and satisfaction of wearing a tartan that has been created and woven in Scotland to a standard in keeping with Lochcarron amp; Scotland's reputation. It is no accident that there is a definite influence from the Greatest Patriot after Wallace amp; Bruce. He died in attempting to take the heart of Bruce to the Holy Land. (view tartan)
Ramsay Blue Ancient
This family are of Anglo-Norman origin and were in the Lothians in the 12th century. They took a prominent part in Border warfare. George Ramsay of Dalhousie was created Lord Ramsay of Melrose in 1618, but shortly afterwards the title was changed to Lord Ramsay of Dalhousie. The 2nd Lord Ramsay became Earl of Dalhousie in 1633. The 5th Earl was Colonel of the Scots Guards when that body fought for the Archduke Charles of Austria during the War of the Spanish Succession. The 10th Earl, created Marquis in 1849, was Governor-General of India from 1847 to 1858. (view tartan)
Ramsay Red Ancient
This family are of Anglo-Norman origin and were in the Lothians in the 12th century. They took a prominent part in Border warfare. George Ramsay of Dalhousie was created Lord Ramsay of Melrose in 1618, but shortly afterwards the title was changed to Lord Ramsay of Dalhousie. The 2nd Lord Ramsay became Earl of Dalhousie in 1633. The 5th Earl was Colonel of the Scots Guards when that body fought for the Archduke Charles of Austria during the War of the Spanish Succession. The 10th Earl, created Marquis in 1849, was Governor-General of India from 1847 to 1858. (view tartan)
Ramsay Red Modern
This family are of Anglo-Norman origin and were in the Lothians in the 12th century. They took a prominent part in Border warfare. George Ramsay of Dalhousie was created Lord Ramsay of Melrose in 1618, but shortly afterwards the title was changed to Lord Ramsay of Dalhousie. The 2nd Lord Ramsay became Earl of Dalhousie in 1633. The 5th Earl was Colonel of the Scots Guards when that body fought for the Archduke Charles of Austria during the War of the Spanish Succession. The 10th Earl, created Marquis in 1849, was Governor-General of India from 1847 to 1858. (view tartan)
Rattray Ancient
Perthshire is the native county of this family who take their name from the old Barony of Rattray. They are claimed have been settled in Perthshire in the time Rattray was one of the Barons who attended the Parliament at Ayr in 1315 to settle the succession to the Scottish crown. In 1648 the lands were erected into a free barony called Craighall and Rattray. The name is also found in Aberdeen and Dundee at an early date. (view tartan)
Renwick Ancient
This name is derived from Renwick in Cumberland, old Ravenswic, on east side of the River Eden. James Renwick, the Covenanter, was the last man executed (1688) for religious principles in Scotland. Variations in the form of Runnick, Rinnick, Rennick are also recorded in Scotland. In view of the origin of the name I find it strange that little if any mention of the name is to be found in English reference books. Main areas where this name has flourished would appear to be in the Dumfriesshire district. The tartan detailed above bears a remarkable resemblance to the Clergy tartan in design though not in colours. Details of the sett were obtained from a specimen in the Catto Collection in Willowdale, Canada, but little if anything would appear to be known about the origin of this indeed rare tartan. (view tartan)
Rollo Ancient
(view tartan)
Rose Hunting Ancient
The Clan Rose have been settled in Nairnshire since the 12th century. Kilravoch Castle, built in 1460, is the home of the chief. They lived on friendly terms with their neighbours and did not engage in clan feuds. They were consistent in their loyalty to the Government and supported the Hanoverians during the two Jacobite Risings. The 15th chief opposed the Union of Parliament in 1707, but became one of the Scottish Commissioners in the first British Parliament. Not a numerous clan, they were able to muster 300 men. The chiefship of this clan has been represented by an unbroken succession since the 15th century. (view tartan)
Rose Hunting Modern
The Clan Rose have been settled in Nairnshire since the 12th century. Kilravoch Castle, built in 1460, is the home of the chief. They lived on friendly terms with their neighbours and did not engage in clan feuds. They were consistent in their loyalty to the Government and supported the Hanoverians during the two Jacobite Risings. The 15th chief opposed the Union of Parliament in 1707, but became one of the Scottish Commissioners in the first British Parliament. Not a numerous clan, they were able to muster 300 men. The chiefship of this clan has been represented by an unbroken succession since the 15th century. (view tartan)
Rose Red Modern
The Clan Rose have been settled in Nairnshire since the 12th century. Kilravoch Castle, built in 1460, is the home of the chief. They lived on friendly terms with their neighbours and did not engage in clan feuds. They were consistent in their loyalty to the Government and supported the Hanoverians during the two Jacobite Risings. The 15th chief opposed the Union of Parliament in 1707, but became one of the Scottish Commissioners in the first British Parliament. Not a numerous clan, they were able to muster 300 men. The chiefship of this clan has been represented by an unbroken succession since the 15th century. (view tartan)
Ross Hunting Ancient
The Rosses take their name from the Province of Ross and in the Highlands are called Clan Andrias, or "Children of Andrew", from an early chief who is said to have been a devotee of St Andrew. Fearchar Mac an-t-sagairt, or "son of the priest", of Applecross, is traditionally claimed as their ancestor. He supported King Alexander II, and about 1234 was made Earl of Ross. The clan supported King Robert the Bruce and fought at Bannockburn in 1314. At a later date the Earldom reverted to the crown. Hugh Ross of Rarichiss, brother of the last Earl, founded the Balnagowan branch which became the principal family. They engaged in clan feuds and had a turbulent existence. The Rosses of Pitcalnie were another important branch and are now the chief family. Badge - Juniper. (view tartan)
Ross Hunting Modern
The Rosses take their name from the Province of Ross and in the Highlands are called Clan Andrias, or "Children of Andrew", from an early chief who is said to have been a devotee of St Andrew. Fearchar Mac an-t-sagairt, or "son of the priest", of Applecross, is traditionally claimed as their ancestor. He supported King Alexander II, and about 1234 was made Earl of Ross. The clan supported King Robert the Bruce and fought at Bannockburn in 1314. At a later date the Earldom reverted to the crown. Hugh Ross of Rarichiss, brother of the last Earl, founded the Balnagowan branch which became the principal family. They engaged in clan feuds and had a turbulent existence. The Rosses of Pitcalnie were another important branch and are now the chief family. Badge - Juniper. (view tartan)
Ross Hunting Weathered
The Rosses take their name from the Province of Ross and in the Highlands are called Clan Andrias, or ldquo;Children of Andrew, from an early chief who is said to have been a devotee of St Andrew. Fearchar Mac an-t-sagairt, or ldquo;son of the priest, of Applecross, is traditionally claimed as their ancestor. He supported King Alexander II, and about 1234 was made Earl of Ross. The clan supported King Robert the Bruce and fought at Bannockburn in 1314. At a later date the Earldom reverted to the crown. Hugh Ross of Rarichiss, brother of the last Earl, founded the Balnagowan branch which became the principal family. They engaged in clan feuds and had a turbulent existence. The Rosses of Pitcalnie were another important branch and are now the chief family. (view tartan)
Ross Red Ancient
The Rosses take their name from the Province of Ross and in the Highlands are called Clan Andrias, or ldquo;Children of Andrew, from an early chief who is said to have been a devotee of St Andrew. Fearchar Mac an-t-sagairt, or ldquo;son of the priest, of Applecross, is traditionally claimed as their ancestor. He supported King Alexander II, and about 1234 was made Earl of Ross. The clan supported King Robert the Bruce and fought at Bannockburn in 1314. At a later date the Earldom reverted to the crown. Hugh Ross of Rarichiss, brother of the last Earl, founded the Balnagowan branch which became the principal family. They engaged in clan feuds and had a turbulent existence. The Rosses of Pitcalnie were another important branch and are now the chief family. (view tartan)
Ross Red Modern
The Rosses take their name from the Province of Ross and in the Highlands are called Clan Andrias, or ldquo;Children of Andrew, from an early chief who is said to have been a devotee of St Andrew. Fearchar Mac an-t-sagairt, or ldquo;son of the priest, of Applecross, is traditionally claimed as their ancestor. He supported King Alexander II, and about 1234 was made Earl of Ross. The clan supported King Robert the Bruce and fought at Bannockburn in 1314. At a later date the Earldom reverted to the crown. Hugh Ross of Rarichiss, brother of the last Earl, founded the Balnagowan branch which became the principal family. They engaged in clan feuds and had a turbulent existence. The Rosses of Pitcalnie were another important branch and are now the chief family. (view tartan)
Ross Red Weathered
The Rosses take their name from the Province of Ross and in the Highlands are called Clan Andrias, or ldquo;Children of Andrew, from an early chief who is said to have been a devotee of St Andrew. Fearchar Mac an-t-sagairt, or ldquo;son of the priest, of Applecross, is traditionally claimed as their ancestor. He supported King Alexander II, and about 1234 was made Earl of Ross. The clan supported King Robert the Bruce and fought at Bannockburn in 1314. At a later date the Earldom reverted to the crown. Hugh Ross of Rarichiss, brother of the last Earl, founded the Balnagowan branch which became the principal family. They engaged in clan feuds and had a turbulent existence. The Rosses of Pitcalnie were another important branch and are now the chief family. (view tartan)
Roxburgh Ancient
Roxburgh, the county of the middle march, is amongst the most beautiful and historic areas of Scotland. Now included in the administrative region known as the quot;Bordersquot;, Roxburgh is the true border county. Here the Roman armies came and withdrew to build Hadrian's Wall to restrain the war-like Scots. Crusaders, Kings, Queens and the great Border clans made this land along the River Teviot rich in history, tradition and spirit. The Roxburgh Tartan now woven commercially for the first time in perhaps a century and a half, is gaining recognition as a truly representative district tartan. (view tartan)
Russell Ancient
An English baron, who came from England with Edward II and was at the Battle of Halidon Hill in 1333, is claimed as the ancestor of the Russells of Aden, Aberdeenshire. We find Russells owning property at Elgin in 1600, and in Banffshire in 1680. Of the Russells of Ashiestiel, Selkirkshire, several had distinguished military careers. The name has varied in spelling and took many forms. Russell is believed to mean quot;russetquot; or quot;redquot;. (view tartan)
Russell Modern
An English baron, who came from England with Edward II and was at the Battle of Halidon Hill in 1333, is claimed as the ancestor of the Russells of Aden, Aberdeenshire. We find Russells owning property at Elgin in 1600, and in Banffshire in 1680. Of the Russells of Ashiestiel, Selkirkshire, several had distinguished military careers. The name has varied in spelling and took many forms. Russell is believed to mean quot;russetquot; or quot;redquot;. (view tartan)
Ruthven Ancient
(view tartan)
Scott Black and White Ancient
One of the most powerful of Border clans the Scotts are first recorded in the 12th century. The Scotts of Buccleuch are the principal family. Sir Walter Scott was created Lord Scott of Buccleuch in 1600 and his son, the 2nd Lord, was elevated as Earl of Buccleuch in 1619. Anna, Countess of Buccleuch, daughter of the 2nd Earl, married the Duke of Monmouth, and on their marriage in 1673 were created Duke and Duchess of Buccleuch. Sir Walter Scott, the famous writer, was descended from the Harden branch. The Scotts of Balwearie were another important branch. (view tartan)
Scott Green Ancient
One of the most powerful of Border clans the Scotts are first recorded in the 12th century. The Scotts of Buccleuch are the principal family. Sir Walter Scott was created Lord Scott of Buccleuch in 1600 and his son, the 2nd Lord, was elevated as Earl of Buccleuch in 1619. Anna, Countess of Buccleuch, daughter of the 2nd Earl, married the Duke of Monmouth, and on their marriage in 1673 were created Duke and Duchess of Buccleuch. Sir Walter Scott, the famous writer, was descended from the Harden branch. The Scotts of Balwearie were another important branch. (view tartan)
Scott Green Modern
One of the most powerful of Border clans the Scotts are first recorded in the 12th century. The Scotts of Buccleuch are the principal family. Sir Walter Scott was created Lord Scott of Buccleuch in 1600 and his son, the 2nd Lord, was elevated as Earl of Buccleuch in 1619. Anna, Countess of Buccleuch, daughter of the 2nd Earl, married the Duke of Monmouth, and on their marriage in 1673 were created Duke and Duchess of Buccleuch. Sir Walter Scott, the famous writer, was descended from the Harden branch. The Scotts of Balwearie were another important branch. (view tartan)
Scott Green Weathered
One of the most powerful of Border clans the Scotts are first recorded in the 12th century. The Scotts of Buccleuch are the principal family. Sir Walter Scott was created Lord Scott of Buccleuch in 1600 and his son, the 2nd Lord, was elevated as Earl of Buccleuch in 1619. Anna, Countess of Buccleuch, daughter of the 2nd Earl, married the Duke of Monmouth, and on their marriage in 1673 were created Duke and Duchess of Buccleuch. Sir Walter Scott, the famous writer, was descended from the Harden branch. The Scotts of Balwearie were another important branch. (view tartan)
Scott Hunting Ancient
One of the most powerful of Border clans the Scotts are first recorded in the 12th century. The Scotts of Buccleuch are the principal family. Sir Walter Scott was created Lord Scott of Buccleuch in 1600 and his son, the 2nd Lord, was elevated as Earl of Buccleuch in 1619. Anna, Countess of Buccleuch, daughter of the 2nd Earl, married the Duke of Monmouth, and on their marriage in 1673 were created Duke and Duchess of Buccleuch. Sir Walter Scott, the famous writer, was descended from the Harden branch. The Scotts of Balwearie were another important branch. (view tartan)
Scott Hunting Modern
One of the most powerful of Border clans the Scotts are first recorded in the 12th century. The Scotts of Buccleuch are the principal family. Sir Walter Scott was created Lord Scott of Buccleuch in 1600 and his son, the 2nd Lord, was elevated as Earl of Buccleuch in 1619. Anna, Countess of Buccleuch, daughter of the 2nd Earl, married the Duke of Monmouth, and on their marriage in 1673 were created Duke and Duchess of Buccleuch. Sir Walter Scott, the famous writer, was descended from the Harden branch. The Scotts of Balwearie were another important branch. (view tartan)
Scott Red Modern
One of the most powerful of Border clans the Scotts are first recorded in the 12th century. The Scotts of Buccleuch are the principal family. Sir Walter Scott was created Lord Scott of Buccleuch in 1600 and his son, the 2nd Lord, was elevated as Earl of Buccleuch in 1619. Anna, Countess of Buccleuch, daughter of the 2nd Earl, married the Duke of Monmouth, and on their marriage in 1673 were created Duke and Duchess of Buccleuch. Sir Walter Scott, the famous writer, was descended from the Harden branch. The Scotts of Balwearie were another important branch. (view tartan)
Scottish Odyssey
In the days of the Roman invasion of Britain, the area now known as Scotland would have proved most inhospitable, with much of the land covered in forestation. However by the 18th century, it was clear by the writings of Dr Samual Johnston describing his journey through Scotland that the experience was most rewarding. Our Odyssey tartan has been produced to recognise and contribute to the ever increasing attraction of a journey through one of the most spectacularly contrasting landscapes to be seen in Europe. Although there is still a considerable amount of woodland, this blends in with the dramatic mountain scenery of the Western Highlands with spectacular shore lines and their myriad of islands, complimented in the East with softer landscapes creating unique golfing links separated by salmon rivers and wide estuaries. This same pure water is the base of the thriving whisky distilleries based in the North East. The South abounds with the intriguing remains of medieval abbeys amongst the soft rolling Border hills harbouring small towns and villages born through the woollen and farming requirements of Scotland, but now heavily involved in Exporting. The architecture and culture in the cities of Edinburgh, Glasgow, Perth, Dundee, Stirling and Inverness are an attraction to an ever increasing numbers of visitors, with Aberdeen growing as a thriving port for our oil industry. The Scottish Odyssey tartan is a celebration of the wonderful experiences to be gained during your visit to Scotland. `Haste Ye Back (view tartan)
Scrimgeor Ancient
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Seton Ancient
The first Seton mentioned in Scottish records is Alexander Seton who lived during the reign of King David I. The home of the family was Tranent. Mary Seton one of Mary, Queen of Scots' quot;four Mariesquot;, was a sister of 5th Lord Seton and it was this Lord Seton who assisted the Queen to escape from prison in Lochleven Castle in 1568. The 6th Lord was raised to the peerage as Earl of Winter in 1600. The peerage was attained after the 5th Earl had taken up arms for the Jacobites in 1715. The name may be derived from the Seatown or Saytown, near Tranent. Badge-Yew. (view tartan)
Seton Modern
The first Seton mentioned in Scottish records is Alexander Seton who lived during the reign of King David I. The home of the family was Tranent. Mary Seton one of Mary, Queen of Scots' quot;four Mariesquot;, was a sister of 5th Lord Seton and it was this Lord Seton who assisted the Queen to escape from prison in Lochleven Castle in 1568. The 6th Lord was raised to the peerage as Earl of Winter in 1600. The peerage was attained after the 5th Earl had taken up arms for the Jacobites in 1715. The name may be derived from the Seatown or Saytown, near Tranent. Badge-Yew. (view tartan)
Shaw Green Ancient
The Shaws were members of the Clan Chattan Confederation and their original home was Rothiemurchus. They claimed descent from Shaw, a great grandson of the 6th chief of Mackintosh. This Shaw is said to have commanded the Clan Chattan at the Battle of the North Inch of Perth in 1396. The Shaws lost Rothiemurchus to the Comyns in the 15th century. They regained possession at a later date, but by the 16th century the lands had again passed out of their possession. The Shaws of Todarroch owned their lands from the 15th century and were known as Clain Aidh. They took a prominent part in the affairs of their native Strathnairn. (view tartan)
Shaw Green Modern
The Shaws were members of the Clan Chattan Confederation and their original home was Rothiemurchus. They claimed descent from Shaw, a great grandson of the 6th chief of Mackintosh. This Shaw is said to have commanded the Clan Chattan at the Battle of the North Inch of Perth in 1396. The Shaws lost Rothiemurchus to the Comyns in the 15th century. They regained possession at a later date, but by the 16th century the lands had again passed out of their possession. The Shaws of Todarroch owned their lands from the 15th century and were known as Clain Aidh. They took a prominent part in the affairs of their native Strathnairn. (view tartan)
Shaw Of Tordarroch Ancient
The Shaws were members of the Clan Chattan Confederation and their original home was Rothiemurchus. They claimed descent from Shaw, a great grandson of the 6th chief of Mackintosh. This Shaw is said to have commanded the Clan Chattan at the Battle of the North Inch of Perth in 1396. The Shaws lost Rothiemurchus to the Comyns in the 15th century. They regained possession at a later date, but by the 16th century the lands had again passed out of their possession. The Shaws of Todarroch owned their lands from the 15th century and were known as Clain Aidh. They took a prominent part in the affairs of their native Strathnairn. (view tartan)
Shepherd Ancient
This is probably the oldest check we possess. To make it originally, no dye would be required, since the wool from white and black sheep could be used. In this case, the ldquo;white would be ldquo;natural and the black would be anything from a brown to the very dark colour of the fleece of a ldquo;black sheep. Many of the old weavers preferred the so-called black of nature to that produced by the dyers, since black is the most fugutive of all their dyes: a fact that has accounted in the past for many a mistake in describing the sett of a tartan from ancient material. The traditional black dyes of the Highlands were made from alder-bark, dock-root and the root of the water-flag. (view tartan)
Sinclair Hunting Ancient
This family is of Norman origin. In the 12th century William de Sancto Claro received the Barony of Midlothian. In the 14th century Henry St Clair became Earl of Orkney. The 3rd Earl, in 1446, founded Rosslyn Chapel. In 1445 he was created Earl of Caithness and the Earldom of Orkney was resigned in 1470. The Sinclairs were frequently engaged in clan warfare with Gunns. They were powerful and influential in the north where they held high positions. Sir John Sinclair of Ulbster, who died in 1835, was a noted agriculturalist and writer. His best-known work was the editing of the first Statistical Account of Scotland. (view tartan)
Sinclair Hunting Modern
This family is of Norman origin. In the 12th century William de Sancto Claro received the Barony of Midlothian. In the 14th century Henry St Clair became Earl of Orkney. The 3rd Earl, in 1446, founded Rosslyn Chapel. In 1445 he was created Earl of Caithness and the Earldom of Orkney was resigned in 1470. The Sinclairs were frequently engaged in clan warfare with Gunns. They were powerful and influential in the north where they held high positions. Sir John Sinclair of Ulbster, who died in 1835, was a noted agriculturalist and writer. His best-known work was the editing of the first Statistical Account of Scotland. (view tartan)
Sinclair Hunting Weathered
This family is of Norman origin. In the 12th century William de Sancto Claro received the Barony of Midlothian. In the 14th century Henry St Clair became Earl of Orkney. The 3rd Earl, in 1446, founded Rosslyn Chapel. In 1445 he was created Earl of Caithness and the Earldom of Orkney was resigned in 1470. The Sinclairs were frequently engaged in clan warfare with Gunns. They were powerful and influential in the north where they held high positions. Sir John Sinclair of Ulbster, who died in 1835, was a noted agriculturalist and writer. His best-known work was the editing of the first Statistical Account of Scotland. (view tartan)
Sinclair Red Ancient
This family is of Norman origin. In the 12th century William de Sancto Claro received the Barony of Midlothian. In the 14th century Henry St Clair became Earl of Orkney. The 3rd Earl, in 1446, founded Rosslyn Chapel. In 1445 he was created Earl of Caithness and the Earldom of Orkney was resigned in 1470. The Sinclairs were frequently engaged in clan warfare with Gunns. They were powerful and influential in the north where they held high positions. Sir John Sinclair of Ulbster, who died in 1835, was a noted agriculturalist and writer. His best-known work was the editing of the first Statistical Account of Scotland. (view tartan)
Sinclair Red Modern
This family is of Norman origin. In the 12th century William de Sancto Claro received the Barony of Midlothian. In the 14th century Henry St Clair became Earl of Orkney. The 3rd Earl, in 1446, founded Rosslyn Chapel. In 1445 he was created Earl of Caithness and the Earldom of Orkney was resigned in 1470. The Sinclairs were frequently engaged in clan warfare with Gunns. They were powerful and influential in the north where they held high positions. Sir John Sinclair of Ulbster, who died in 1835, was a noted agriculturalist and writer. His best-known work was the editing of the first Statistical Account of Scotland. (view tartan)
Skene Ancient
The Skenes take their name from their Aberdeenshire lands which they occupied before the Scottish War of Independence. They got a charter from Robert the Bruce erecting their lands into a barony. Several of their early chiefs were killed in battle, particularly the Battles of Harlaw, Flodden and Pinkie. The direct line expired in 1827, when the estates went to the 4th Earl of Fife, nephew of the last chief of Skene. There were several prominent families, including Skene of Halyards. (view tartan)
Smith Ancient
This is one of the most common of all surnames and is scattered throughout the length and breadth of Scotland. It is therefore difficult to assign a place of origin for this name. It is recorded that for 400 years a family of Smiths were resident at Strathblane. In the Gaelic-speaking Highlands the name is rendered as Gow. The Smith tartan was designed by Sir William Smith, founder of the Boys Brigade. (view tartan)
Smith Modern
This is one of the most common of all surnames and is scattered throughout the length and breadth of Scotland. It is therefore difficult to assign a place of origin for this name. It is recorded that for 400 years a family of Smiths were resident at Strathblane. In the Gaelic-speaking Highlands the name is rendered as Gow. The Smith tartan was designed by Sir William Smith, founder of the Boys Brigade. (view tartan)
Sommerville Ancient
(view tartan)
Spirit of Scotland Ancient
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Spirit of Scotland Modern
(view tartan)
Stevenson Hunting Modern
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Stewart Black Ancient
The Royal Stewart tartan generally referred to simply as the Royal Tartan, has been associated with the Royal House of Stewart for several centuries. The Stewart monarchs were descended from Walter, High Steward of Scotland, who married Princess Marjory, daughter of King Robert the Bruce. Their son, King Robert II, was the first Stewart king. The male line of the Royal House of Stewart ended with the death of Prince Henry, brother of Prince Charles Edward. H.M. The Queen is chief of the Royal House of Stuart and ldquo;chief of chiefs. (view tartan)
Stewart Black Modern
The Royal Stewart tartan generally referred to simply as the Royal Tartan, has been associated with the Royal House of Stewart for several centuries. The Stewart monarchs were descended from Walter, High Steward of Scotland, who married Princess Marjory, daughter of King Robert the Bruce. Their son, King Robert II, was the first Stewart king. The male line of the Royal House of Stewart ended with the death of Prince Henry, brother of Prince Charles Edward. H.M. The Queen is chief of the Royal House of Stuart and ldquo;chief of chiefs. (view tartan)
Stewart Dress Modern
The Royal Stewart tartan generally referred to simply as the Royal Tartan, has been associated with the Royal House of Stewart for several centuries. The Stewart monarchs were descended from Walter, High Steward of Scotland, who married Princess Marjory, daughter of King Robert the Bruce. Their son, King Robert II, was the first Stewart king. The male line of the Royal House of Stewart ended with the death of Prince Henry, brother of Prince Charles Edward. H.M. The Queen is chief of the Royal House of Stuart and ldquo;chief of chiefs. (view tartan)
Stewart Dress Weathered
The Royal Stewart tartan generally referred to simply as the Royal Tartan, has been associated with the Royal House of Stewart for several centuries. The Stewart monarchs were descended from Walter, High Steward of Scotland, who married Princess Marjory, daughter of King Robert the Bruce. Their son, King Robert II, was the first Stewart king. The male line of the Royal House of Stewart ended with the death of Prince Henry, brother of Prince Charles Edward. H.M. The Queen is chief of the Royal House of Stuart and ldquo;chief of chiefs.,white,pink,red,yellow,mustard,black,grey, (view tartan)
Stewart Hunting Ancient
Stewart Hunting Ancient Light Weight Tartan. The Royal Stewart tartan generally referred to simply as the Royal Tartan, has been associated with the Royal House of Stewart for several centuries. The Stewart monarchs were descended from Walter, High Steward of Scotland, who married Princess Marjory, daughter of King Robert the Bruce. Their son, King Robert II, was the first Stewart king. The male line of the Royal House of Stewart ended with the death of Prince Henry, brother of Prince Charles Edward. H.M. The Queen is chief of the Royal House of Stuart and ldquo;chief of chiefs. (view tartan)
Stewart Hunting Modern
Stewart Hunting Ancient Light Weight Tartan. The Royal Stewart tartan generally referred to simply as the Royal Tartan, has been associated with the Royal House of Stewart for several centuries. The Stewart monarchs were descended from Walter, High Steward of Scotland, who married Princess Marjory, daughter of King Robert the Bruce. Their son, King Robert II, was the first Stewart king. The male line of the Royal House of Stewart ended with the death of Prince Henry, brother of Prince Charles Edward. H.M. The Queen is chief of the Royal House of Stuart and ldquo;chief of chiefs. (view tartan)
Stewart Hunting Weathered
Stewart Hunting Ancient Light Weight Tartan. The Royal Stewart tartan generally referred to simply as the Royal Tartan, has been associated with the Royal House of Stewart for several centuries. The Stewart monarchs were descended from Walter, High Steward of Scotland, who married Princess Marjory, daughter of King Robert the Bruce. Their son, King Robert II, was the first Stewart king. The male line of the Royal House of Stewart ended with the death of Prince Henry, brother of Prince Charles Edward. H.M. The Queen is chief of the Royal House of Stuart and ldquo;chief of chiefs. (view tartan)
Stewart of Appin Ancient
This West Highland family descends from Sir James Stewart of Pierson who was descended from the 4th High Steward of Scotland. For a time they were Lords of Lorn, and were of importance in their Western territory. They were Royalists and fought valiantly for the Royal Stewarts. Duncan Stewart, 2nd of Appin, was Chamberlain of the Isles to King James IV. They fought under Montrose at the Battle of Inverlochy, and in the Jacobite army at Sheriffmuir in 1715. During the 1745 Rising the clan served in Prince Charlies army. The 9th chief sold the estate in 1765. (view tartan)
Stewart of Appin Hunting Ancient
This West Highland family descends from Sir James Stewart of Pierson who was descended from the 4th High Steward of Scotland. For a time they were Lords of Lorn, and were of importance in their Western territory. They were Royalists and fought valiantly for the Royal Stewarts. Duncan Stewart, 2nd of Appin, was Chamberlain of the Isles to King James IV. They fought under Montrose at the Battle of Inverlochy, and in the Jacobite army at Sheriffmuir in 1715. During the 1745 Rising the clan served in Prince Charlies army. The 9th chief sold the estate in 1765. (view tartan)
Stewart of Appin Hunting Modern
This West Highland family descends from Sir James Stewart of Pierson who was descended from the 4th High Steward of Scotland. For a time they were Lords of Lorn, and were of importance in their Western territory. They were Royalists and fought valiantly for the Royal Stewarts. Duncan Stewart, 2nd of Appin, was Chamberlain of the Isles to King James IV. They fought under Montrose at the Battle of Inverlochy, and in the Jacobite army at Sheriffmuir in 1715. During the 1745 Rising the clan served in Prince Charlies army. The 9th chief sold the estate in 1765. (view tartan)
Stewart of Appin Modern
This West Highland family descends from Sir James Stewart of Pierson who was descended from the 4th High Steward of Scotland. For a time they were Lords of Lorn, and were of importance in their Western territory. They were Royalists and fought valiantly for the Royal Stewarts. Duncan Stewart, 2nd of Appin, was Chamberlain of the Isles to King James IV. They fought under Montrose at the Battle of Inverlochy, and in the Jacobite army at Sheriffmuir in 1715. During the 1745 Rising the clan served in Prince Charlies army. The 9th chief sold the estate in 1765. (view tartan)
Stewart of Atholl Modern
The old Earldom of Atholl was held by several of the Royal Stewarts. King James III conferred the Earldom on his half-brother, Sir John Stewart of Belveny. The daughter and heiress of the 6th Earl married the 2nd Earl of Tullibardines. The Earl became the Earl of Atholl, but retained his surname of Murray. The Stewarts of Atholl were strong and powerful and were extremely loyal to the Royal house of Stewart. They fought at the Battle of Killiecrankie under Viscount Dundee, and during the Jacobite Rising of 1745 they formed part of the right wing of the Jacobite army at the Battle of Culloden in April, 1746. Badges-Oak, Thistle. (view tartan)
Stewart Old Sett Ancient
The Royal Stewart tartan generally referred to simply as the Royal Tartan, has been associated with the Royal House of Stewart for several centuries. The Stewart monarchs were descended from Walter, High Steward of Scotland, who married Princess Marjory, daughter of King Robert the Bruce. Their son, King Robert II, was the first Stewart king. The male line of the Royal House of Stewart ended with the death of Prince Henry, brother of Prince Charles Edward. H.M. The Queen is chief of the Royal House of Stuart and ldquo;chief of chiefs. (view tartan)
Stewart Old Sett Modern
The Royal Stewart tartan generally referred to simply as the Royal Tartan, has been associated with the Royal House of Stewart for several centuries. The Stewart monarchs were descended from Walter, High Steward of Scotland, who married Princess Marjory, daughter of King Robert the Bruce. Their son, King Robert II, was the first Stewart king. The male line of the Royal House of Stewart ended with the death of Prince Henry, brother of Prince Charles Edward. H.M. The Queen is chief of the Royal House of Stuart and ldquo;chief of chiefs. (view tartan)
Stewart Royal Modern
The Royal Stewart tartan generally referred to simply as the Royal Tartan, has been associated with the Royal House of Stewart for several centuries. The Stewart monarchs were descended from Walter, High Steward of Scotland, who married Princess Marjory, daughter of King Robert the Bruce. Their son, King Robert II, was the first Stewart king. The male line of the Royal House of Stewart ended with the death of Prince Henry, brother of Prince Charles Edward. H.M. The Queen is chief of the Royal House of Stuart and ldquo;chief of chiefs. (view tartan)
Stuart of Bute Modern
The Stewarts of Bute are descended from Sir John Stewart, natural son of King Robert II. He was known as quot;The Black Stewartquot; to distinguish him from his half-brother, Sir John Stewart of Dundonald, who was called quot;The Red Stewartquot;. The Black Stewart was heritable Sheriff of Bute about 1385. Sir James Stuart was created a Baronet of Nova Scotia in 1627. In 1703 the 3rd Baronet was elevated as Earl of Bute. The 4th Earl was created Marquis of Bute in 1796. (view tartan)
Sutherland Hunting Ancient
The Earldom of Sutherland is said to be the oldest in Britain and was conferred about 1228 on William, Lord Sutherland. This William was descended from Freskin, who received the lands of Moray from King David I. The 2nd Earl of Sutherland was killed at Bannockburn in 1314. The Sutherlands, who took their name from the County of Sutherland, wielded great power in the north and their early history is one of almost continual strife with their neighbours. On the death of the 9th Earl the title passed to his son-in-law, Adam Gordon of Aboyne. They were a numerous clan, and in 1745 their fighting strength was estimated at 2000. After the death of the 18th Earl his son-in-law became Marquis of Stafford and was created Duke of Sutherland in 1833. (view tartan)
Sutherland Hunting Modern
The Earldom of Sutherland is said to be the oldest in Britain and was conferred about 1228 on William, Lord Sutherland. This William was descended from Freskin, who received the lands of Moray from King David I. The 2nd Earl of Sutherland was killed at Bannockburn in 1314. The Sutherlands, who took their name from the County of Sutherland, wielded great power in the north and their early history is one of almost continual strife with their neighbours. On the death of the 9th Earl the title passed to his son-in-law, Adam Gordon of Aboyne. They were a numerous clan, and in 1745 their fighting strength was estimated at 2000. After the death of the 18th Earl his son-in-law became Marquis of Stafford and was created Duke of Sutherland in 1833. (view tartan)
Sutherland Hunting Weathered
The Earldom of Sutherland is said to be the oldest in Britain and was conferred about 1228 on William, Lord Sutherland. This William was descended from Freskin, who received the lands of Moray from King David I. The 2nd Earl of Sutherland was killed at Bannockburn in 1314. The Sutherlands, who took their name from the County of Sutherland, wielded great power in the north and their early history is one of almost continual strife with their neighbours. On the death of the 9th Earl the title passed to his son-in-law, Adam Gordon of Aboyne. They were a numerous clan, and in 1745 their fighting strength was estimated at 2000. After the death of the 18th Earl his son-in-law became Marquis of Stafford and was created Duke of Sutherland in 1833. (view tartan)
Sutherland Old Ancient
The Earldom of Sutherland is said to be the oldest in Britain and was conferred about 1228 on William, Lord Sutherland. This William was descended from Freskin, who received the lands of Moray from King David I. The 2nd Earl of Sutherland was killed at Bannockburn in 1314. The Sutherlands, who took their name from the County of Sutherland, wielded great power in the north and their early history is one of almost continual strife with their neighbours. On the death of the 9th Earl the title passed to his son-in-law, Adam Gordon of Aboyne. They were a numerous clan, and in 1745 their fighting strength was estimated at 2000. After the death of the 18th Earl his son-in-law became Marquis of Stafford and was created Duke of Sutherland in 1833. (view tartan)
Sutherland Old Modern
The Earldom of Sutherland is said to be the oldest in Britain and was conferred about 1228 on William, Lord Sutherland. This William was descended from Freskin, who received the lands of Moray from King David I. The 2nd Earl of Sutherland was killed at Bannockburn in 1314. The Sutherlands, who took their name from the County of Sutherland, wielded great power in the north and their early history is one of almost continual strife with their neighbours. On the death of the 9th Earl the title passed to his son-in-law, Adam Gordon of Aboyne. They were a numerous clan, and in 1745 their fighting strength was estimated at 2000. After the death of the 18th Earl his son-in-law became Marquis of Stafford and was created Duke of Sutherland in 1833. (view tartan)
Sutherland Old Weathered
The Earldom of Sutherland is said to be the oldest in Britain and was conferred about 1228 on William, Lord Sutherland. This William was descended from Freskin, who received the lands of Moray from King David I. The 2nd Earl of Sutherland was killed at Bannockburn in 1314. The Sutherlands, who took their name from the County of Sutherland, wielded great power in the north and their early history is one of almost continual strife with their neighbours. On the death of the 9th Earl the title passed to his son-in-law, Adam Gordon of Aboyne. They were a numerous clan, and in 1745 their fighting strength was estimated at 2000. After the death of the 18th Earl his son-in-law became Marquis of Stafford and was created Duke of Sutherland in 1833. (view tartan)
Taylor Ancient
The Taylors are a sept of Clan Cameron. They claim to be descended from a Cameron clansman who lived during the 16th century and was known as Tailear Dubh na Tuaighe, The Black Tailor of the Axe. This man was a natural son of the 14th Chief of Lochiel. A group of families in the Cowal district, who lived there until the end of the 18th century, were known as Mac-an-tailler and thought of themselves as Camerons of the Camerons, under the designation of Clann an Taillear Duibh Chamronach. This tartan was designed in 1955 by two outstanding authorities on tartans: Miss Margaret MacDougall, of the Inverness Museum, and Lt.-Col. I. B. Cameron Taylor. The double black lines in the tartan are said to represent the Black Tailor and his bar sinister. (view tartan)
Thompson Blue
The Thomson tartans are of fairly recent origin, having been specifically created for Lord Thomson of Fleet. These were submitted to the Lord Lyon and registered by him in 1958. (view tartan)
Thompson Hunting Ancient
The Thomson tartans are of fairly recent origin, having been specifically created for Lord Thomson of Fleet. These were submitted to the Lord Lyon and registered by him in 1958. (view tartan)
Thompson Red Ancient
The Thomson tartans are of fairly recent origin, having been specifically created for Lord Thomson of Fleet. These were submitted to the Lord Lyon and registered by him in 1958. (view tartan)
Thompson Red Modern
The Thomson tartans are of fairly recent origin, having been specifically created for Lord Thomson of Fleet. These were submitted to the Lord Lyon and registered by him in 1958. (view tartan)
Turnbull Dress Modern
The Turnbull Clan Association was formed in Hawick in the late 1970's and has gathered members throughout the world. In 1978 the Association produced two tartans. These two tartans - Hunting Turnbull and Dress Turnbull - have been created from a marriage of the Douglas and Bruce tartans - both clans having had much to do with the history of the Turnbulls. (view tartan)
Turnbull Hunting Ancient
The Turnbull Clan Association was formed in Hawick in the late 1970's and has gathered members throughout the world. In 1978 the Association produced two tartans. These two tartans - Hunting Turnbull and Dress Turnbull - have been created from a marriage of the Douglas and Bruce tartans - both clans having had much to do with the history of the Turnbulls. (view tartan)
Turnbull Hunting Modern
The Turnbull Clan Association was formed in Hawick in the late 1970's and has gathered members throughout the world. In 1978 the Association produced two tartans. These two tartans - Hunting Turnbull and Dress Turnbull - have been created from a marriage of the Douglas and Bruce tartans - both clans having had much to do with the history of the Turnbulls. (view tartan)